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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
gday everyone.
this is my first post so i hope someone will read this. i am looking at my first triumph.
it is a trophy 1200 and am very excited about it. just wanting to no what i should be looking at when i see and ride the bike. it is a 98 model and has 38000 klms on it. also wanting to no what the comfort levels are like. i will be rite but i need the wife to be happy as well.
cheers
Darrin
australia
 

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When you ride the Trophy,you'll know if it's for you or not.I love mine,and have found it to be both reliable and comfortable.I've fitted it with a custom seat, Gen-Mar handle bar risers and Laminar Lip and have done lots of 600 mile days.Mine has a top box and backrest pad.My wife claims she's totally comfortable back there.The only downside(as with ANY fully full faired bike)is, with hard bags,topbox and fairing,sidewinds can be a drag.That's a lot of sail.As far as what to look for,that's just common sense.Hope you're impressed enough to buy it.
 

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Also, be aware that they are top-heavy. A 31" inseam would be ideal for the Trophy, or get a lower saddle, as I did.

That's me...a 29" inseam in a 31" saddle height world: Jim
 

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I've never heard anyone complain about the pillion's comfort level so they must be good in that respect.

Depending on your height and build, some people have complaints about the pilot's comfort however.

As mentioned above, people with short legs find it a very tall saddle height. When it's got a full tank (and add in a loaded top box) you really notice the top-heaviness. The stock saddle also tends to make you side forward causing problems for the male gender (delicately put).

Most owners love the bike enough that they change saddles and often add bar risers to make up for those small shortcomings.
 

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I have done the same to my bike as everyone else.
But search for coil problems. They are easy to change,but not cheap to buy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies every one. i have talked to heaps of people here and over abroad. very impressed with what i have heard. also the complaints about the coils.
i go and test ride tomorrow and hopefully buy it. it should in my shed in 24 hrs.
thanks again for your time.
Darrin
Australia
 

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I forgot about the coil problems....probably the only real weak point as far as mechanicals or electricals go.

Yet, this problem seems to be sporadic. Some people have had their coils go at a rather low mileage while others get many years and miles of service from theirs.

I've been one of the lucky ones and still have my original coils on my '96 model with 58,000 miles.

Some people say that removal of the foam heat barrier above the engine and below the coils causes it while others swear that removing it actually allows more air to flow in that area.

Don't know who's right...but i do know that when that foam is removed, you get more heat in your crotch on a hot day.
 

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Someone mentioned they hadn't heard any pillion complaints -- well, they haven't been near my wife/favorite passenger (one & the same). When I bought my Trophy 1200, back in '97 (New old stock), the first thing I modified was the seat. The driver's pocket forced me into the tank with it's angle, the little flip in the back bothered my beloved so much that she was threatening never to ride with me again. A little redesign, and the problems were solved! I redesigned the saddle so the driver's pocket was flat/parallel to the ground, and removed that little flip in the back. I had new, denser foam installed so that my thinner saddle would keep me off the bike's frame. Sargent Cycleworks in Jacksonville, FL, did the work, to my specifications, and they got it right the first time. My wife and I have been on many long (>800 miles) trips, and no complaints about saddle comfort. (No connection to Sargents. They reworked my saddle, and I have one of their tankbag systems.)

YMMV
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks again guys.
i brought the bike on saturday. travelled from home to sydney and home in the same day. great trip.
only one question. i have heard about the bike sometimes dropping out in the heat. the bike actually just died 3 time in about 3 hours. i just stopped and let it cool down and it started straight away. does anyone know more about this problem.
cheers
darrin
 

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Welcome Darrin,
I am not sure if you mean heat issues with the electrical system or the coolant system. I have not heard of any widespread problems with the Trophy and cooling issues. I have had my bike down to New Orleans and Daytona Beach, in August when it was hot and humid. I had no problems. The bike has been serviced at all regular intervals so I know the coolant and system are good. No problems with the electrical system either. Hope it is not a problem because it is truly a great bike.

Ride on.
Paul
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
the heating problem was with the cooling system. i did read somewhere on another site that someone else had the same issue but cannot remember where i seen it. other than that the bike is great. the kids love it and more importantly so does the wife. (happy wife , happy life)
i am not sure what the problem was with the heat because that was my first ride on it but i will speak to a few triumph huys in newcastle and coffs harbour (about two hours either north or south of me) they are the closest dealers around here to me.
p.s: can anyone recommend a good rider/pillion intercom system.
cheers
darrin
 

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If your bike stops when hot and starts again when it gets a chance to cool down then it is displaying a classic symptom of a Crank Position Sensor going bad.

They are very easy to replace.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks for that seeker. i have just ordered a workshop manual for the bike. i will check that out for sure. the only thing that has me a little confused is that the temperature on the day was about 40 degrees c. but it happened about 2 1/2 hours into the ride..
p's has anyone thought about installing a temp gauge on the bike. if that is the issue.
cheers
darrin
 

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Welcome Darrin and congrats on the Trophy.
I do not understand how you cut-out problem is related to the cooling system. I guess I need more info. It sounds like the pick-up.
You asked about an intercom system. I can tell you about the one I use. It is a Collett system. It has a voice activated microphone system that is a little tricky until you get the squelch set ( which varies at speed). There is also a plug in for a mp3 player and if you talk the music fades until you stop talking. The voice activated mic's take some getting use to. You have to blow into the mic then start talking or you miss the first half of the sentence. The helmet speakers are built for voices not music so the quality is poor.
My system is 10yr old, so I hope the issues have been resolved in the newer models.
Mark
 

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I rarely hear of Trophys with cooling problems per se. Of course there are those that need new thermostats, temperature sensing units (fan switch), or a new fan. But on a Trophy that's got no cooling system leaks or any of the above going bad, they simply won't overheat even in the hotest climates. You WILL feel some heat in the crotch area when the ambient temps are real high but you do on most bikes on days like that.

If you've got enough coolant and your fan turns on when it gets hot, then you've nothing to worry about and won't need a gauge.

Even on the hottest of days your fan won't turn on while you are moving at any speed above a crawl.

This is what leads me to think you have a crank (ignition) sensor unit failure...it's also a fairly common thing to go out. If you have an ohmeter, it's very easy to see if your's is out of spec. The hardest part about changing them isn't changing the sensor itself IMHO...it's getting the wires undone from the frame that was the pain.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks again seeker. as soon as i get my manual that will be the first thing i will check. from what you are saying i am feeling better about the cooling system. there is no leaks at all. so i will check it out and let you no.
cheers
darrin
 

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Before your manual even arrives, you can set your mind at ease by starting up that beast on the centre stand and just idling it until it gets hot. It'll take quite a while but eventually the cooling fan should click on.
<BR>
<BR>As long as you have enough coolant in the reservoir and the fan comes on...your cooling system is OK.
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<BR>A little advice on the ignition sensor....
<BR>
<BR>Do this job with the bike leaning on it's side stand so your oil won't leak out on the right side when you have the cover removed.
<BR>
<BR>If you were to get the bike hot enough that it quits and won't restart, then you can spray something cold like brake or carb cleaner on the sensor (be sure there's no way you can have it run onto any painted parts) to cool it down quickly. If the bike restarts after it's cool, then the sensor needs replaced.
<BR>
<BR>PS: If you ordered a Haynes manual, the crank position sensor is referred to as the "ignition pick-up coil" and the procedure is listed on page 5.3

[ This message was edited by: Seeker on 2007-01-23 10:05 ]
 
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