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Discussion Starter #1
I've been increasingly concerned about the health of Triumph in the U.S. as I see one dealer after another drop the brand. There is one new Triumph-only dealer in Brooklyn, my home, but otherwise I see the brand disappearing.

This past weekend I spoke to a salesman in a shop on Long Island (Gold Coast Motorsports). I rode out there just to get a ride in and to ogle bikes. They carry a lot of brands so there are lots of bikes to drool over, but only three Triumphs-3 Thruxtons.

It looked they were dropping Triumph and the salesman confirmed that they were weeding them out due to poor corporate support/relations. This is a story I've heard several times now. This guy said that Triumph has not had a CEO for N.A. for years, and the way their working with dealers costs them too much money.

I don't think of myself as a Triumph fanboy, but I do feel a connection to the brand's history (one of the first bikes I got to see as a kid), and being a current owner I have practical concerns (parts), and desire to see the cool bikes that Triumph is currently putting out.

Are the problems I'm hearing about, and seeing as shop after shop cuts Triumph, a national issue? Is there a move to correct it?

If this is being discussed in another thread and I'm duplicating please direct me there.
 

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Seems that after being well received in the US Triumph has gotten a big head and began demanding their dealers be Triumph ONLY dealers. They'll allow a few exceptions for obscure scooter and dirt bike brands.

Triumph is also pretty demanding regarding square footage and parts, accessory, and bike stocking levels.

In today's market it seems that it would be difficult for a dealer to exist as a Triumph only dealer so they're dropping the brand in self defense.

Seems the same "market challenged thinkers" that drove Triumph into the ground back in the day got hired at the new Triumph.

Royal Enfield in the US is suffering the same fate in a different way. While their new offerings are interesting, especially the twins, there are few RE dealers and RE USA is doing little to remedy that. They want us to call dealers states away and waste time trying to explain what parts we need instead of putting parts lists and tech info on their web site so we can help ourselves and make it easier to buy parts.

Some businesses make money despite their best efforts not to.
 

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When I bought my Bonnie in 2008 Triumph was about value. Both the Bonneville and the Tiger at that time were awesome bikes in their class, and at a great price point. The Tiger was about as good as a BMW F800GS and a ton cheaper. Bonnie way better than a Sportster, and way cheaper. Mr. Bloor was about building rock-solid machines and getting them to market at an excellent price point.

At some point, Triumph left this model and decided to be a boutique/prestigious brand. Maybe sell fewer bikes, but at a higher price. (Reminds me of Steve Martin saying instead of selling out a stadium at $20 a ticket, he was aiming to sell one ticket to one guy for a million dollars).

Not sure if this change happened when Mr. Bloor passed the reigns to his son or not. The Euro 4 emissions conversion might just have forced their hand. I don't know.

Then there was the Milwaukee influence, since departed but the effects still seem to linger. He may not of been the only one with the same vision: https://www.triumphrat.net/club-cafe/934042-big-shakeup-at-triumph-usa.html. That vision was high-volume, single-brand dealers. Get with the program or get out. And lots of smaller shops are indeed out. The pace of closures seems to have slowed since that guy's demise, but no new vision is emerging. There are a couple really good small dealers around here that I worry about. But, Triumph can't force everyone to close, and the large single-brand dealerships aren't springing up fast. And the Milwaukee example isn't the shining north star it might have once been.

Now they want to sell lifestyle and motorcycles/accessories like they're expensive jewelry as much as they want to just sell bikes. I miss the good old days.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I really like what they've done with some models, like the Speed Twin and Scrambler 1200. The latter seems to create a new sense of adventure bike. It's unfortunate that their business practices aren't as progressive.

Maybe I'm unusual but I only buy bikes used, and I buy them only after years of riding the current one. But I buy parts and accessories and I'll do it locally if there's availability and the price is decent. I also like to visit shops and I seek out the ones that appear to have a riding culture in the atmosphere (hard to find, actually). And visiting multi-brand shops is a lot more fun than single-brand shops. Simply being in a shop can add to its presence: are you more or less likely to have dinner in an empty restaurant?

Anyway, I hope they don't screw it up.
 

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I really like what they've done with some models, like the Speed Twin and Scrambler 1200. The latter seems to create a new sense of adventure bike.
I agree. Too many features for my taste (ABS, etc) and the locked ECUs make me grind my teeth. But that is just the way the world is now. It's the price point that kills it for me, even used I don't think a 1200 Scrambler or a T120 is something that'll be priced where I'd buy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I agree. Too many features for my taste (ABS, etc) and the locked ECUs make me grind my teeth. But that is just the way the world is now. It's the price point that kills it for me, even used I don't think a 1200 Scrambler or a T120 is something that'll be priced where I'd buy it.
They 'lock' the ECU so you have to take it to a dealer to remap? :mad: And I suppose they'd love you to have them install that nice after market pipe, too.
 

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I was around in 1995 when Triumph came back to the U.S. and I met with Michael Lock then the head Triumph U.S. guy. They were a small organization but were dedicated to doing everything they could to make the dealers successful.

Tons of demo bikes, rallies, raids, great part and warranty support. The bikes were solid but a bit pricey but two years later they cut the prices about $1500. However, when you called they wanted to know what they could do for you.

After a few years sharing the floor in dealerships with brands like BMW it was BMW insist that either Triumph would go or BMW would go. Naturally mostly BMW dealers BMWs still out sold Triumph by 3 to 1 in 1999, so many dealers reluctantly let Triumph go.

About that time (1997) Lock was gone and Triumph decided they wanted to be like BMW a premium brand and have their own dealerships, I expect Mr Bloor made that decision.

In the first 5 to 6 years dealers could choose the bikes they wanted for their market.

Now what do we got? Bikes priced even higher than many BMW models, old dealers gone and either replaced by new dealers who know little or nothing about the bikes they are selling, less on models 10 years old or no dealers at all. Push back on warranty items, negligence in handling recalls and excessive times to get even basic parts. Forcing dealers to take models they don't want.

I bought my 8th and probably last Triumph in 2016. I've bought two bikes since 2016 and neither were Triumphs, not because I didn't like the bikes but mostly because they are overpriced and I don't like the Triumph Corporation anymore.
 

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Im kind of torn on this because I personally HATE it when a Triumph dealer is actually the dreaded "power sports" dealer that sells just about anything powered by a motor. The stand alones or maybe 2 brands under one roof seems to be the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
@retjustdad53 I hope Triumph can reform its business practice, at least in the US, to stop the loss of dealerships.
 

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@retjustdad53 I hope Triumph can reform its business practice, at least in the US, to stop the loss of dealerships.
Hope they do but I doubt they will.

When the Hinckley's arrived Triumph had an opportunity to established their brand as an appealing 2nd tier line with a good pedigree for established dealers. That's what they did and dealers were interested

Then Triumph changed direction and they made the same mistake that Ducati did and decided that Triumph was Harley-Davidson or BMW instead of Moto-Guzzi, MV, or Royal Enfield. Few dealers will survive as Triumph only dealers and the dealers know that.

When Triumph made that change they lost dealers just like Ducati did when they made the same decision.
 

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I would think the ability to have a single brand stand alone dealership is gone. Too expensive and not enough offerings to keep the sales flowing. I remember talking to a small dealer owner in Boston that started out a Kawasaki dealership and eventually took on Yamaha, Ducati and Triumph. Still wasn't enough especially in the winter months. He eventually moved to another location and I think is a Ducati dealer only. But, he's been in business for more than 40yrs. Today's dealer owners are usually partnerships and need to sell everything with an engine or wheels or treads. Huge investment to open a dealership. It's Deja Vu. Many old established BMW dealerships closed their doors when corporate made expensive demands on them. I miss those mom and pop operations. Small in size but their staff knew everything.
 

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The motorcycle industry is no longer the motorcycle industry... it is, and has been for a long time, THE CAR INDUSTRY.

From the first "little Honda" in the 60's the MC biz was no longer the enthusiasts business that it was. mom and Pop motorcycle shops went the way of Triumph, BSA, and Norton.

The problem for these mega motorcycle dealerships being run like car dealerships is that people don' t have to buy motorcycles they have to WANT to buy motorcycles, but people HAVE to buy cars. That was true in the 60's and it still is true today, but companies like Triumph can't see the forest through the trees.
 

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When I got my T100 about 2 weeks ago (its imported by motorbike shop from UK), called the main Triump distributor wanted to change oil and filter. to my horror, they ask if bikes are not purchase from them, they will not service the bikes, IF one needs to service Triumph bikes not purchase by them, paid a joining fee of GBP960 pounds !!! ok, so ask if i could buy the oil filter and again, bike not bought via them or not a member, unable to sell me the oil filter !!!

Wrote to Triumph UK which have also shared with previous owner, he says don't waste time, he has written to Triumph when he got the bike and no replied from them. its been close to a week and sure enough, there is no replies from Triumph !

So if expat or someone whom wants to bring back the bike from other countries, he/she will be stuck of not been able to service the bike, unless one fork out a cut-throat GBP960 !!!

I could understand without knowing the history of the bike to service and later owner blame them, BUT not even purchasing parts from them which is stupid ridiculous.

since just got it, will ride for a year and change to Japs bike as am not a slave to Triumph.
 

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They seem to be doing their best to kill the brand off here in the US.
The dealership I bought The Yellow Banana (02 RS) dropped Triumph shortly after I made my purchase and their parts prices are so stupidly out of line that I try to NEVER, EVER buy a new part from Triumph.
Not even a Tee Shirt.
They're HOW MUCH?

I wish it wasn't that way but that's the way they set it up.

Is that good for the dealers? Hell no.
Maybe they need to wake up and take a look at what's going on.
 

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FWIW, I just forwarded a link to this thread to Triumph NA and UK.
We're their customer base, maybe they need to read what we think.
Who knows, maybe some high muckity muck type might take a look at this and the direction they're headed in and decide to do something positive for the consumer, the dealers and the company itself.

Triumph was riding high many moons ago and we all know how that went.
Don't want to see history repeat itself as they make a great product.
 

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FWIW, I just forwarded a link to this thread to Triumph NA and UK.
We're their customer base, maybe they need to read what we think.
Who knows, maybe some high muckity muck type might take a look at this and the direction they're headed in and decide to do something positive for the consumer, the dealers and the company itself.

Triumph was riding high many moons ago and we all know how that went.
Don't want to see history repeat itself as they make a great product.
A noble effort but Triumph couldn't care less. They made a calculated decision to adopt this business model and they'll live or die with it. Businesses today genuinely believe the customer base is SO vast that they can abuse a significant number of consumers and still reap the profits they envision. That's the Walmart way and it is proven EVERYDAY by the predators in Bentonville.

There is a way to get the attention of a company that did you wrong...

After being a loyal Subaru owner for quite a while, and buying the EXPENSIVE subaru extended warranty, in 2017 our beloved Subaru Outback Sport developed the widely experienced and acknowledged head gasket failure that all 2.5L engines from 2002 till 2011 will succumb to just after the warranty runs out.

I went to the dealer who estimated the head gasket job would be $2600. I contacted Subaru USA directly and made my case also informing them that we had purchased a new 2011 Subaru Impreza to keep the Sport company and that I expected them to stand behind the well documented head gasket failure and warranty the repair.

Subaru USA declined to cover the cost of the repair but offered me a $1000 coupon to be used for the purchase of a new Subaru. I asked the CS agent... what would make you think I'd buy another Subaru after you screwed me, and hundreds of thousands of other Subaru owners, by not standing behind your faulty engineering and manufacturing defects?

Subaru bellows that 97% of Subaru vehicles sold in the last 10 years are still on the road today but they omit the rest of the sentence... 97% of Subaru vehicles sold in the last 10 years are still on the road today and the owners pay dearly to keep them on the road because Subaru does not stand behind their manufacturing defects.

In my mind when you don't get justice you get revenge so I spend a bit of time every day on all the Subaru forums and blogs PMing people interested in buying Subarus to tell them my story and encourage them to investigate Subaru's history of not standing behind their cars.

Since then to date I have killed 571 Subaru sales and that's quite a chunk of change.

Contact Triumph directly, wherever you are, and tell them that as an owner you're not happy and why.

And always... VOTE WITH YOUR WALLET.
 

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Dealing motorcycles is a tough gig. In Australia all Triumph dealers are multi-franchise, except a few capital city stores connected to Triumph Australia. The nearest dealer to me is a big multi-franchise (including Japanese), and most times I go there the number of staff exceeds the number of customers.

Even the Triumph store in Melbourne has moved out of the traditional motorcycle strip (as has Harley) to a place that makes no sense to me, obviously because the rent is lower.

Maybe we customers are to blame, for wanting a 'brand identity' that multi-franchise does not deliver. I doubt the manufacturers would be doing this if the market wasn't asking for it.
 

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FWIW, I just forwarded a link to this thread to Triumph NA and UK.
We're their customer base, maybe they need to read what we think.
Not sure they care about us forum dwellers, the paragraph readers, folks that write in full sentences. With punctuation no less.

Their future are the one's that post pictures, after applying the correct sepia tone filter. Those that can say all that needs to be said in 280 characters or less. Or, indeed, need no words at all and can conduct entire conversations in acronyms and emoticons. The "influencers", and the influencees.

We are the past.


.
 

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I don't believe there are markets anymore. Manufacturers create the product and then invent the market. Whether the product is wanted by the buying public or not. They will ram a bike model down the public's throat to recoup the tooling costs. If the Street Cup disappears, no big deal for Triumph It wasn't a unique stand alone model anyway. Makes no sense, however, to create hassles for customers who simply want to have their bike serviced or repaired or to purchase parts.
 
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