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Most of their bikes have been made in Thailand for quite a while now. My 2008 Bonnie was. This is the last of the UK manufacturing moving there though, kinda sad.
I'm not sure what year they first started building bikes in Thailand, as far as I can make out mines British but to be honest I can't really say for sure.
 

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I wonder if Production lines move between India and Other countries as the labour rates change ?
 

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Does it really matter as all their parts are sourced world wide and assembled in England and Thailand and both factories are the same in design just different people working there.

Ashley
 

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Providing the new people are correctly trained, understand how to assemble correctly, then as you say why should it matter. If they take on manufacturing skills such as welding, machining, making wiring looms etc that are cheaper in that country then you need good QA to make sure the overall end product does not go backwards.
 

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Providing the new people are correctly trained, understand how to assemble correctly, then as you say why should it matter. If they take on manufacturing skills such as welding, machining, making wiring looms etc that are cheaper in that country then you need good QA to make sure the overall end product does not go backwards.
"then you need good QA" and therein lies the rub. QA today is factored by cost effectiveness and the willingness of the manufacturer to effect warranty repairs effectively and in a timely manner with higher quality than was exhibited on the production line.
 

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Providing the new people are correctly trained, understand how to assemble correctly, then as you say why should it matter. If they take on manufacturing skills such as welding, machining, making wiring looms etc that are cheaper in that country then you need good QA to make sure the overall end product does not go backwards.
Its don't matter where they are assembled as all their staff would be trained whether in England or Thailand they all get the same training and the same with mistakes made it don't matter where its assembled people do make mistakes and that's why they have inspections and quality control to pick up on those mistakes, we don't live in a perfect world, but I am sure what ever factory they work at they would all get the same training, even long term experience staff would make mistakes, and if they get past those inspections that's why we have warranty.

Ashley
 

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since I have the "J" character in my VIN, my '97 Trophy is clearly worth many dollars, and I pity all you fools who have worthless, Thai-manufactured bikes! May you suffer endless calamities with your pathetic, unreliable machinery!!!! hahahahahahahahahahahahaha...(cackling, maniacal laughter)

/s

really, seriously?? I can't believe this is still a topic, somehow..
 

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Yep, they won't be worth as much as the Brit ones in the long run
I have a Meridian(1970 Bonne) bike and a Thailand one(2014 Bonne), they both have about the same number of miles on them, one leaks oil, carbs dont work for sh!t, the other runs like a dream.

Wont be worth as much in the long run, BS, what do you base that on? There are people on here that believe that these bikes if kept original will maintain/or increase in value, I think they're in for a rude awakening someday, or if they do hold/increase in value they wont be alive to see it.
I'll take my Thailand assembled bike any day over my British one. Why is it that the Japanese bikes became so popular.
 

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I have a Meridian(1970 Bonne) bike and a Thailand one(2014 Bonne), they both have about the same number of miles on them, one leaks oil, carbs dont work for sh!t, the other runs like a dream.

Wont be worth as much in the long run, BS, what do you base that on? There are people on here that believe that these bikes if kept original will maintain/or increase in value, I think they're in for a rude awakening someday, or if they do hold/increase in value they wont be alive to see it.
I'll take my Thailand assembled bike any day over my British one. Why is it that the Japanese bikes became so popular.
Really sorry you are having so many problems with your Hinckley Triumph.

K
 

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I know this is purely a business decision and probably makes sense on some financial spreadsheet but it is completely the opposite of the reason John Bloor acquired Triumph in the first place.
His passion was not really for motorcycles but to prove that Britain was not the manufacturing backwater many were claiming and that it could design, engineer and manufacture complex, desirable and reliable products that would succeed in international markets.
I recall his early speeches when he would despair at having to listen to other European business magnates mock British manufacturing. It was this that drove him to prove them wrong.
 

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Perhaps this was inevitable. Us Brits are moving our whole country away from that nasty, smelly industrial production towards happy, smiling creative jobs that don’t pollute the world. It gives us more time to sit in our hot tubs in the garden whilst smugly blaming foreigners for ruining the environment.

Strangely, the economy is doing fine and we are managing to keep nearly all of the 60 million of us gainfully employed, which is nice.

As far as the bikes are concerned it will not make any difference, a chap in Thailand will be able to operate a repetitive assembly process just as well as one in Leicestershire, and probably cheaper. Having a specialised production facility here in England, close to markets and able to react to the whims of fashion quickly makes great sense. Similarly taking advantage of the UK’s investment in education to design, research and develop bikes in England is eminently sensibly.

Having led the western world into the Industrial Age 400 years ago, England is now leading it out of it.

:)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Perhaps this was inevitable. Us Brits are moving our whole country away from that nasty, smelly industrial production towards happy, smiling creative jobs that don’t pollute the world. It gives us more time to sit in our hot tubs in the garden whilst smugly blaming foreigners for ruining the environment.

Strangely, the economy is doing fine and we are managing to keep nearly all of the 60 million of us gainfully employed, which is nice.

As far as the bikes are concerned it will not make any difference, a chap in Thailand will be able to operate a repetitive assembly process just as well as one in Leicestershire, and probably cheaper. Having a specialised production facility here in England, close to markets and able to react to the whims of fashion quickly makes great sense. Similarly taking advantage of the UK’s investment in education to design, research and develop bikes in England is eminently sensibly.

Having led the western world into the Industrial Age 400 years ago, England is now leading it out of it.

:)


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The management/organization of the Thai factories rely on British personal in a big way so quality control will remain high, in my opinion. Just like the Thai built BMW cars. I am a friend of Thai owner of my local Triumph dealership and he works closely with the guys in UK plus visits UK too. Generally the dealers are very proud of the British heritage.

(Othen, this Brit has been working/living in Thailand for the last 15 years and it ain’t too bad!)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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