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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I know this has probably been asked a million times, and I have done a fair bit of searching on the subject, but still need help.

How the fook do you get the airbox back onto the carbs?

I have tried just about everything, and am completely stumped. There must be some technique which I don't know about, and the Haynes is as much use as a chocolate fire guard. :mad: :mad: :???:
 

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When I try to reassemble everything:

-From the side I slide the carbs in between the intake ports and the airbox.

-Connect the throttle cable and the choke.

-Align the carbs with the intake ports on the engine. Push hard and wiggle until the boots are seated evenly.

-After several carefully chosen, four letter explitives and several nicks to the fingers, line up the airbox with the rear carb boots and push the airbox forward until it all fits.

MAKE SURE YOURE CLAMPS ARE COMPLETELY LOOSE DOING THIS!

Asides from that... good luck! :-D
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I have tried that, however I just cant get the airbo to line up properly with the carbs. Is it possible to split the airbox, and re-join it one the rubbers are seated on the carbs?
 

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You need to keep the air box together as a unit. It's not designed to be assembled in the bike. Try some silicone spray on the boots. I have a cheater tool which is a worn out flat blade screwdriver with no sharp edges that I'll use to help coax the boots on, It's really only hard the first and second time you do it.
 

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Actually, it's only hard the third and fourth and ....

If you don't have silicone spray handy, brake cleaner will work in a pinch- just a VERY SMALL AMOUNT ON THE CARB MOUTH. Be carefull, the rubbers can roll and bind quite easily (I hate it when that happens). You have to wiggle it and hold your tongue just right.

Godspeed,
Zip
 

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It is awkward but not that awkward.....WD40 works as has been mentioned, I've replaced the box twice and find dismatling half the bike more of a chore ?

Pulling the air box back as far as it will go and jiggling the carbs back is pretty straight forward, once they are nearly there you may have to push and pull them a little, it's only the middle one that could be a bit stubborn in my experience..
 

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Is that the stupidest design you have ever seen or what ? I use a little hand cleaner or liquid dish soap when I put them on. Still a bad design...
 

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still look on he bright side you only have to change the box every 25000 miles. did mine last year and it was awkward but you can do it.
 

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HI!
I know how you feel....i also sent a post about this under the title air filter.....i got some good advice take a look you will see.
It took me 2hrs and some help from my brother in law to get it all together...did this about 2 weeks ago...i kept the old filter box took it apart cleaned the filter like new now!
Just to say i was born in Southampton...
Good luck!
 

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As I remember the job, (I hated it too), there is just a bit of a bias in the boots that connect the carbs to the head (Have you had'em off?) and, if you have the boots pointing (or hooked) the wrong way, it will***** the carbs so that the airbox will never mate with them. I don't have the bike or the books here in front of me and I cannot remember, to save my soul, whether the boots should hook up or hook down.
 

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I can't even believe that the word, well I guess I can't use the word, another name for a rooster or a verb that means the thing that you do to a gun's lock prior to firing, or to "set askew" has been censored from my previous posting.
Ah, well....
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This board definitely has the censor set on kill. I think I mentioned using a piece of (unused, excess, discarded, left-over, surplus) metal for something in one of my first posts, & I was surprised to see the adjective I used rendered as "s****"...

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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A K&N filter is available and a good idea. A little trick I have a lot of success with, when replacing the carb/airbox - is to use thin plastic strips in between the inlet rubbers and the airbox - sliding the carbs (cables in place) in between with little hinderance from the rubber s - these strips 3"x10" in size make the whole process largely painless - the thickness of the plastic - about that of a credit card, less even - where you'd get that plastic from in the UK I no longer know but I use a cut up 'for sale' sign - we get those from Home Despot (DIY store). Get a new battery, and a battery tender at the same time. It is a good idea for you to remove the petrol tank, that will reveal the coils. To them, the low tension wires are afixed - those spade connectors need a dang good clean, oxidation seems to occur here. Get them shiney and crimp the female a little to assure a good firm fit and then apply a little diaelectric grease to keep the connection sealed - not too much though. These connections if compromised cause all sorts of mysterious issues, spastic tacho, stuttering misfire and random stalling so spend time here - make sure the battery terminals are tightly connected too. Hopefully the carbs aren't gummed up - and with a new fresh battery she'll fire up - hope so good luck!


Typcil sent this to me helped me a lot.


[ This message was edited by: crambuster on 2007-03-16 02:12 ]
 

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I have just had the carburettors off & on my bike today. I found the hardest part was disconnecting & re-connecting the throttle cable, unless I was doing it wrong.

The 'witches hat' in-line fuel filters in the carburettor hose junctions were partly obstructed with dirt. Question is, why didn't the tank filter catch the dirt? it is intact, no holes in the gauze.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Dave:

The answer may be in the 2 holes at the top of the petcock filter assembly. It may also be that the witch-hats just catch finer particles than the gauze. Maybe that's why someone put them on there? (Could also be they were just cheaper or easier to find than the Triumph inline filters.)

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Well yeah i have to say this type airbox design is bad, it's exactly the same as my beloved and sorely missed GPZ900R though. The easiest way to get the whole plot back together i've found is to
a. fit the cables to the carbs,
b. slide the carbs in between the rubber manifolds and the airbox boots,
c. push the carbs onto the manifolds,
d. tilt the airbox up so that the bottom of the boots is under the mouth of the carbs, now push forward and tilt airbox back level and they slide straight on, if they don't at least it's the top of the boots that aren't going on and they're easy to get at. Oh and be sure to have the clamps loosened right off.
Hope that helps
 

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A little trick I have a lot of success with, when replacing the carb/airbox - is to use thin plastic strips in between the inlet rubbers and the airbox - sliding the carbs (cables in place) in between with little hinderance from the rubber s - these strips 3"x10" in size make the whole process largely painless - the thickness of the plastic - about that of a credit card, less even - where you'd get that plastic from in the UK I no longer know but I use a cut up 'for sale' sign - we get those from Home Despot (DIY store).
Resurrecting an old post to say a BIG THANK YOU for this For Sale sign suggestion. Carbs slid in easy. Getting the boots on the air inlet side is a pain still.
 

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I CAN HELP! !!! ... I have invented a really good way of doing this ..

I am presuming that you have the carbs back on their rubbers and they are pushed all the way back onto their rubbers? Good.

You are now lining up the airbox with the backs of the carbs and pushing it on, accept that the rubbers on the airbox are holding the airbox OFF the carbs.

This is what you do ..

Find a friend, wife, or assistant of somekind (my wife is f_cking useless in these situations because her father was a complete [email protected] when she was growing up, and she now reacts angrily to be told what to do ... but that's another story :) :) )

Lubing up the rubbers with soap is a good idea .. make sure they are pliable and maleable not rock hard.. do whatever you can to loosed them up, including warming them up or buying new ones. If they are too hard they will crack after a while anyway. One of the parts to this secret is that the dealer will just grab new ones and charge you for it! Because this job is such a bastard ..

Anyway ...

Then .. sake the soap and lube up a rounded ended steel ruler !! .. Yes .. you heard.. a steel ruller.. Line up the airbox (take the clamps off the rubbers) and get your assistant to press the airbox home with just enough force as you run round each carb with the steel ruler BETWEEN the bell mouth of the carb and the rubber using it to push out the edge of the rubbers that wont seat ... I usually work from the furthest carb back to the nearest one ...
Works for me every time! (twice) :)
 

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Also...when removing the carbs, it is much much easier to disconnect the throttle cable at the twist grip rather than at the carbs. Just take note of how the cable is routed for installation purposes...

Cheers,

Roden
 
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