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I'm wanting to buy an enclosed trailer and start taking a few trips. I'm just wondering if a Jetta can safely acomplish this. Anyone with any knowledge of Jettas trailering bikes. Mine is a standard shift, by-the-way.
 

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You would think so but it does not.
 

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I would think that the limit would be somewhere around 1500 to 2000 pounds. If the enclosed trailer is not too heavy you should be all right. Gas mileage will be reduced but you will be able to get your bike to far away riding areas with lot's of gear. I use my trailer to haul my bikes to cooler elevations in the summer. Riding in 100+ heat is not my idea of fun. My Kendon stands on end in the garage and uses little space. It is also very light and pulls great behind the Grand Caravan.
 

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My cheap little trailer isn't enclosed,but my 92 Corolla,1600cc,with AT will pull it and my bike,ALL DAY,at + posted speeds and deliver 35mpg. Your Jetta shouldn't have any problem,even adding a few hundred pounds for enclosure.

an added benefit of this backyard score trailer is the 13" Toyota bolt pattern rims. Saves the weight of an additional spare tire and has less rolling resistance than the little wheel versions.
 

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Quick Google Search:

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=204420

Bear in mind this for the TDi Version. I would guess that the limitations are the Chassis not necessarily the power train, since the TDi has a pile of torque. A covered trailer and bike might be a bit much. I would look at a small flatbed type to keep things as light as possible. Or ideally, something like that previously posted single rail bike trailer.
Note: If the manufacturer doesn't post towing data, it's probably not recommended, thus could cause warranty problems when/if they see the trailer hitch.
That said, I saw plenty of ill-suited vehicles towing caravans (camping trailers) when I was in the UK. So where there's a will, there's a way.
 

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I tow my bikes (street or dirt) with my Honda Element.
1500 lbs towing capacity. My three rail trailer weighs maybe 400 lbs (I would guess 250 lbs as I can move/lift it), my heaviest streetbike (Scrambler) may weigh 500 lbs max (always estimate on the heavy side).
So a grand +/- towing weight.

I shrink wrap the front of my bikes to keep 'em clean.
Followed by clear package tape to eliminate any flapping.
Works great.
I have towed a streetbike from Seattle to San Diego this way.
(Got a ticket in Ca. - max speed 55mph with a trailer)
Home built trailers don't alway tow straight, they may weave side to side - not good!
I bought a 'Yachts' brand trailer. Bigger wheels, light leaf springs, pulls straight and will last.
Worth the 900 bucks.

Check your manual or dealer for your cars rating.
The motor will handle it.
 

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When I lived in Northern California I used to haul my bikes all over the state. Hauled my dual sport, dirt, and street bikes and never got a ticket for exceeding the 55mph limit. I think that you were really unlucky getting that ticket. Hell, I used to haul a cargo trailer with my Goldwing and used to keep up with all the traffic. Probably put 20K on one of my trailers and no tickets. It must be the California economy now. They need all the money that they can get I guess.
 

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Unless you have an endless supply of money I'd get a small 4'X8' flatbed and add Black & Gray cycle stands in the trailer. I've hauled a Vrod, A FZ1, and a Goldwing all the way from Northern Michigan to Lake Havasu City, Arizona and back on one with no problems. Granted it will pick up some road grime, especially if it's raining or snowing but I just take them to a car wash when I'm at my destination and clean them up. If you were riding it you'd get the same dirt on it. The car should be able to handle the extra 750-1000 lbs. You might lose some mileage but that's expected.
 

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Really? I thought Oregon was the most screwed up state,speed limit wise. Guess I'll haul the Bonnie in the pickup if it means not having to go slow.:D
As a CDL driver, Ca is always known as the nightmare state for commercial drivers, and as I found out the 55 mph limit applies to non-commercial trailers also.
Was not worth the argument with Mr. CHP at midnight lol (10 miles short of the Or. border grrr).

I haul ass through Oregon... 70-80 mph.
And that is close to irresponsible while towing a trailer of any sort.

Try wrapping your bike in shrink wrap guys, its an easy way to keep your bike cleaner while hauling.
 

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http://www.volkswagenaccessories.co.uk/accessories/SearchAccessories.do?range=jetta&modelId=500000029&groupId=257&text=&x=32&y=1

Apparently towing is possible and sanctioned for the the Jetta....in the UK. You might want to contact VW UK and see what they recommend there. I don't believe that there are that many structural differences between the two models that would impact towing ability.

It would appear that you are not the first to do this in the US however:

http://www.jcwhitney.com/class-i-receiver-hitches/p2004349.jcwx
 

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A lot of carmakers have shied away from listing towing specs for their USDM compact passenger cars. The reason is that the NHTSA has rear impact testing procedures now (as of the '08 model year, I believe). Only a very small portion of the US public buys a small car with the intent of using it to tow (trucks are cheap, and the mentality is that you need a full-size pickup to tow 1000lbs :rolleyes:) so automakers avoid paying to crash test another car with the hitch installed. We don't know if the hitch makes the car any more or less safe in a rear impact, and the automakers won't put forth the money to find out for the sake of a few sales a year.

My '08 Impreza STI has 290lb-ft of torque, a huge bullet-proof transmission with a tough clutch and low gearing, large Brembo brakes, larger wheel bearings than the standard Impreza and a reinforced structure .. while the standard Impreza structure is nearly identical to that used on the Foresters (which is rated to tow 4400lbs in the UK despite having none of the above mentioned extra equipment).. the Forester's beefy hitch (which replaces the rear bumper beam and ties directly into the rear structure) bolts right on...


... but if you ask Subaru of America how much you can tow with an STI... they'll send you a nice letter back explaining that the car is incapable of towing anything.

:BS Flag

In other words.. you'll be fine. If you're going to tow much, you should increase the rate at which you change out all the of the driveline fluids. If it's only occasional short trips, I wouldn't even factor it in.
 

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Sound like the car will handle it.
What I see on the road is car drivers (and paricularly pick-up drivers) that don't know how to tow.
Simple as you think it is, people still jerk the wheel around, talk on the cell, tune their stereo, don't give extra space, lane centering, etc.
Or got some home made POS weaving, bouncing trailer.

The same ones that brag of all the power they have, are the ones towing irresponsibly!

My buddy who was sharing the driving duties with me from San Diego back to Seattle was all over the place with my own car/trailer.

Drive smoooth!
 
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