Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like suggestions for a good trailer that isn't crazy expensive to haul my R3T. We go on long trips and sometimes we have to take our truck but I would like to take the Rocket along too. I'm a large format photographer using huge 8x10" cameras and I carry hundreds of pounds of equipment and, of course, I can't do that on a motorcycle. Anyway, it would be great to haul the Rocket along on our long road trips that when we have to take the truck. I would be hauling it with a 2013 Ford F150 King Ranch with an Ecoboost engine.

I don't foresee needing to use the trailer for anything other than the motorcycle so it would only have to be large enough to haul the bike. To keep cost down, I probably would go with an open trailer.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I live in northern Illinois. A search for "motorcycle trailers" mostly pulls up links for trailers that you pull behind a bike. 0:) I have found some possible trailers online but they are usually located in other states.

On another subject, I'll be heading out on a solo 6,000 (or so) trip on the Rocket in early July. I'm itching to get on the road but, as a photographer, it's frustrating to not have my large format equipment with me as I pass through some of the most beautiful country in North America.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
101 Posts
It might be a little extreme for you but I have a 22 ft toy hauler that is fully self contained. Complete with a couple regular size beds, bathroom and small kitchen. While the kids were smaller we would haul the dirt bikes but now we haul the R3R for camping trips all over California. I was a little hesitant to haul the Rocket because of the weight and size but she did fine.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, that would be more than I'm looking for. I'd like to get a small open motorcycle trailer or a small open trailer that I could modify to haul the bike. Your setup would be way more than I need and storing it would be a problem. Ideally, a trailer I get would be no larger than needed. I found some really nice special-built folding motorcycle trailers but they cost too much. Others I found were too light-duty to haul the heavy R3T. I thought finding the trailer would be easy but so far it hasn't been.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
I'm a Zone VI kinda guy myself.

What format is that camera in your thumb nail? Aside from the famous 20 x 24 Polaroid Studio Camera, I don't think I've ever seen one as large.

The toy hauler idea is nice because you could bring along a darkroom. I've got a large "changing tent", but I don't think it would be large enough to handle the film holders for your format.

Regarding the original trailer question ... I've had three different R3Ts and trailered some of them at different times, either for service, or to pick them up when I bought them, or to drop them off when I traded them. My runs have ranged from Middle Tennessee to the New Hampshire coast, from Daytona Florida to Middle Tennessee, and from Middle Tennessee out to Baxter Iowa in both directions. I've made longer runs in trailers with other motorcycles, having long been involved in buying, selling, trading, etc. A hobby is a hobby.

I've had numerous other motorcycles concurrently with my R3Ts (a couple dozen at least). I keep a trailer that is wide enough for two bikes, and long enough for the R3T (which is actually quite long as motorcycles go).

The R3T is unique in that it weighs 875 pounds. If you tie it to a trailer, you'd better be sure that the trailer's structure is able to withstand the inertia forces associated with accelerating, braking, and cornering. The R3T will test your trailer.

My experience is that only one trailer brand can really stand up long term hauling of an R3T, and that's Wells Cargo. I've had fatigue failures of the lesser brands, both open and closed models. Trust me ... you do not want your trailer to fail while hauling a large, somewhat valuable motorcycle.

The Wells Cargo is built to a professional grade. In 10,000 miles you've pretty much beaten an average trailer to death.

The Wells Cargo will hang in there literally for 100,000 miles... more than most people will ever need.

Now as to the open vs. closed concept... An open trailer is cheaper and lighter to haul, but your bike will have a lot more protection and privacy in a closed trailer. I've abandoned the open models and have gone to the purpose built motorcycle haulers, specifically the Wells Cargo TE (touring edition) line.

http://wellscargo.com/wellscargo-trailers/motorcycle-trailers/te-series/overview/

If you really want an open trailer, the Alumas look pretty cool, but I've never owned one, so I can't say how well they're built. But they look like they're built well. I would not run any trailer with wheels smaller than 14" diameter. Larger diameter means fewer revolutions on the road.

http://www.alumaklm.com/recreational/motorcycle/mc210-motorcycle-trailer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I would like suggestions for a good trailer that isn't crazy expensive to haul my R3T. We go on long trips and sometimes we have to take our truck but I would like to take the Rocket along too. I'm a large format photographer using huge 8x10" cameras and I carry hundreds of pounds of equipment and, of course, I can't do that on a motorcycle. Anyway, it would be great to haul the Rocket along on our long road trips that when we have to take the truck. I would be hauling it with a 2013 Ford F150 King Ranch with an Ecoboost engine.

I don't foresee needing to use the trailer for anything other than the motorcycle so it would only have to be large enough to haul the bike. To keep cost down, I probably would go with an open trailer.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I live in northern Illinois. A search for "motorcycle trailers" mostly pulls up links for trailers that you pull behind a bike. 0:) I have found some possible trailers online but they are usually located in other states.

On another subject, I'll be heading out on a solo 6,000 (or so) trip on the Rocket in early July. I'm itching to get on the road but, as a photographer, it's frustrating to not have my large format equipment with me as I pass through some of the most beautiful country in North America.
I'm not sure where you are located, but U-Haul rents motorcycle trailers (here in Canada) for only around $15 a day - that's what I use a couple times a year.

Sent from my XT1064 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did check out Uhaul trailers and that's definitely an option. They have two trailers that they recommend for U.S. rental. One has to be dropped off where you rented it, which would be fine for my purposes. The other can be dropped off anywhere. In fact, for the cost of a good trailer and the the amount I would use it, Uhaul trailer may be the way to go for me.

I'm not sure where you are located, but U-Haul rents motorcycle trailers (here in Canada) for only around $15 a day - that's what I use a couple times a year.

Sent from my XT1064 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Rocket XIII

The camera in the picture is an 8x10" Ansco/Agfa. It just looks bigger because of perspective. My primary cameras are that and a Wisner 4x5" Technical Field. The camera in the picture is sitting on the large version of a Ries tripod. I use a smaller Ries for my 4x5" cameras. I included the picture just to give an idea of why I need to take my truck on long photographic trips. Of course, the cameras are just the start. All the film bags, backpacks, etc., have to go too. I use a changing tent like you on the road. I print in my darkroom. I have a bunch of instructional darkroom videos on YouTube under my ZoneIII name.

Thanks for the information on trailers. I'm going to check the Wells Cargo trailers out and the other links you mentioned right away. Good tips! A enclosed trailer would be best, of course. I'm just thinking of the money and weight. I would probably use it twice a year or so. I'm thinking of taking a trip to Prince Edward Island this fall and trailering the bike would be ideal for that. (I live about 30 miles west of Chicago.)

Thanks again!

Tom


I'm a Zone VI kinda guy myself.

What format is that camera in your thumb nail? Aside from the famous 20 x 24 Polaroid Studio Camera, I don't think I've ever seen one as large.
...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
Rocket XIII
The camera in the picture is an 8x10" Ansco/Agfa. It just looks bigger because of perspective.
...
I see it now. I just looked quickly and was startled by the size of the camera relative to the size of your head. Now I see that the camera is actually in the foreground and that you are behind.

Ansco and Agfa are names from the distant past. The view camera looks very nice ... but if you've got Ansco or Agfa slides from 50 years ago, they've most likely color shifted quite a bit compared to their Kodachrome cousins. I regret the money I saved by choosing them on occasion.

I keep hearing all the chatter about travel photography with mirrorless cameras like the Sony A6000 or the Fuji X-Pro2 ... You've taken the mirrorless concept to its logical beginning :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I never used Agfa color film. For color, I only shoot Velvia 100 since they discontinued Velvia 50 in sheet film sizes. (I still shoot Velvia 50 in medium format roll film format.) But probably 75% of my photography is in black and white. For that I use Kodak Tmax100, Kodak Tri-X, and Ilford Hp5+ films. I've always done all my own processing except I used to send in E6 film for processing but when so many labs closed down and quality of processing went down, I started processing my own E6 as well using a Jobo processor.

I've been doing large format photography for so long that I will probably never go all-out digital. I almost never shoot smaller formats and the investment in digital equipment to equal the quality of my 35mm equipment (which I rarely even use) would run me over $20,000. Large format suits my style and, besides, I love the process. I just never jumped on the digital bandwagon and, at my age, I never will. I do use my wife's little compact digital camera for snapshots, though.


I see it now. I just looked quickly and was startled by the size of the camera relative to the size of your head. Now I see that the camera is actually in the foreground and that you are behind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
Where are you getting E6 chemistry. B&H still sells it, but they won't ship it (unless that's changed).

If there's someone who would ship me E6 chemistry, I've got some projects. I did my own E-6 and C-41 for many years. I also used Fuji films towards the end of the film era, but they were all Kodak chemistry compatible.

I have a fairly large Jobo processor with color capable temperature control. In fact my entire color darkroom is in tact because it has no value on the used market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
It was a real problem for me when Kodak stopped producing the 5 liter six-step kit for home processing. There is a similar kit available made by Fuji Hunt but it wasn't available in the U.S. until recently (see below). I was actually the guy who got someone to start importing the Fuji Hunt kits.

Anyway, I started using the Tetenal 3-step kits that I get from Freestyle Photo and I've had spectacular results. They are much simpler to mix and use. With the full-blown Kodak E6 kits, as you probably know, it was easy to make a mistake when mixing or processing so you had to pay very careful attention. The Tetenal kits, on the other hand, are a pleasure to use. Some said that the results weren't as good as what you would get from the old Kodak kits and that's why I never used them until I had no choice. But, from the results I've got, I wish I had been using them all along.

As I mentioned, there is a Fuji Hunt full-blown six-step kit very similar to the old Kodak E6 kits on the market but the problem was that it wasn't available in the U.S. I contacted the company who makes them (Ag, I believe) and they said the reason they didn't ship it to the U.S. had something to do with shipping regulations that but that they were considering re-packaging it so they could ship it here. It wasn't that the chemistry couldn't be shipped. It had something to do with the amounts of chemistry in the bottles, if I remember correctly, and they had to package some of the chemicals in smaller containers if they wanted to ship them to the U.S. They said they would consider doing that if there was demand for the kits.

I then contacted Freestyle Photo and asked if they could import it and they said that they would contact Ag about importing the kits and, if there was enough interest, they would start stocking it. I checked their website a couple times after that but I couldn't find the kits listed. The problem, besides availability, was that the kits would be very expensive. But once I started using the Tetenal kits I forgot about the six-step kits entirely because the Tetenal have worked beautifully. (It's odd but the last time I checked, B&H doesn't carry E6 kits at all - not even the Tetenal kits. I believe they do still carry the chemicals separately in large quantities suitable for high-volume labs.) Freestyle is still committed to supporting film photography.

Koda still does produce full-blown E6 chemistry but you can only buy the chemicals separately and in amounts too large and too expensive for most home use.

Anyway, give the Tetenal kits a try. I think you'll be happy with them. I sure am. Like I said, I wish I had been using them all along.

BTW, I just now checked the Freestyle website and they do now carry the Fuji Hunt kits! They are expensive, though. They also carry E6 kits under the Arista brand as well as the Tetenal kits. I haven't tried the Arista kits myself but I believe they have a good reputation too. They come in kits up to one gallon while the Tetenal kits come in sizes up to 5 liter kits. Considering the differences in volume, the prices are about similar but the Fuji Hunt kits cost over twice as much by volume. Apparently photographers like the Fuji Hunt kits, though, because Freestyle said they would only carry it if there was good interest in it.

Here's a link:

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/category/13-Chemicals/Color-Chemicals?attr[]=30-141



Where are you getting E6 chemistry. B&H still sells it, but they won't ship it (unless that's changed).

If there's someone who would ship me E6 chemistry, I've got some projects. I did my own E-6 and C-41 for many years. I also used Fuji films towards the end of the film era, but they were all Kodak chemistry compatible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
Thanks! That's the most useful post I've read on this forum :). I have never dealt with, or even heard of Freestyle. And they've been in business for 70 years if I read the web site correctly.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top