Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,527 Posts
Jack,

Oil threads are a never ending argument over which oil is best. Bottom line is, use a non-energy saving oil of the appropriate viscosity for your engine. For Triumph twins what would be 20W-50. Castrol GTX seems to be very popular here. But other brands are favored, too.

Do a search here for oil and you can read thru all the threads. I think what you will find is if you use a motorcycle appropriate oil and change it regularly, it will serve you well.

Only caveat is if you just rebuilt your engine and the rings are new, it's a good idea to NOT USE synthetic oils. Others have reported poor ring seating and I have a personal friend that after 45 years in the business, had a ring job not seat and it was the only time he use synthetic oil and did so at the request of the owner.

regards,
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
The bike as standard should use a low detergent 20w-50 mineral oil, sometime refered to as a "Classic" or "suitable for classic cars". Do nnot use a more modern "high detergent" oil or any synthetic or a semi-synthetic oil. You will need to change the oil every 1000miles or so (but at least once/yr). Provided the brand is reputable, brand does not matter. Remember however, well known brands of the time such as Castrol GTX, Duckhams etc have moved on in technology and may well nolonger be suitable. There are number of specialist oil manufacturers who blend oils specially for the "classic" engine. It is all down to what the oil does with the burnt carbons that get past the piston and into the oil.

Have a read on the following website - http://www.morrislubricants.co.uk/scripts/prodview.asp?idcat=139&idProduct=251. This is the design of engine you have in a std 1971 bikie.

However, if the bike has been retrofitted with a more modern external filter in the oil line, then the situation changes and now you need a "high detergent" oil which carries the carbon particles in suspension, allowing the filter to do its work. Then the mileage between oil changes can be increased. Again the viscosity range is 20w-50.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,503 Posts
as a caveat to that, some say that you shouldn't use high detergent oil, even with an extra filter, unless you've done the sludge tube. Otherwise, the detergent will allow the crud out and there's a risk of it blocking something before it hits the filter.

also, some oil seals don't - after being used with detergent oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
some say that you shouldn't use high detergent oil, even with an extra filter.
Unless you use a more modern, high detergent oil, then there is little point fitting a filter. The whole point in a filter is that the particles are carried by the oil around to the filter in suspension and trapped in the filter.

As for cleaning out the sludge trap, I would go in the opposite direction and use a flushing oil and drain (twice) with a view to this cleaning out the sludge trap. You only run the bike for a few minutes before draining and refilling, in the process removing the muck. The ultra high detergent properties of the flushing oil will stop the muck accumulating anywhere, it stays in the oil.

In my experence, more problems are caused by splitting an engine to clean out the sludge trap than are ever solved. Unless there is clear evidence that the bearings are shot then I leave well alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
thanks guys for the great infomation. but im still confussed ... i have just reringed and honed the barrels and lapped in the valves on my tr6 but im still at a loss . i need a oil that wont stuff the engine, but i need a oil that works well with the clutch. any ideas ?
thank you all once again , im learning day by day with the help of you guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
I would use a 20w-50 and I'd say the best would be the Silkolene Comp 4. The Silkolene Super 4, V-Twin and Castrol Act Evo are good cheaper alternatives.
The correct oil would be the Motul Classic Oil 20w-50 (From 1950) http://www.opieoils.co.uk/c-785-20w-50-engine-oil.aspx. Click on "Classic Oils" on left

The Comp 4 is for more modern designs with closer tolerences. It is not suitable for a Meriden twin. If you fit a filter, then go for Silkolene Classic Silkolube 20w-50.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Not according to Opie.

"Silkolene Comp 4 20W-50 is also suitable for many vintage and classic engines where monograde oils were originally specified. Also ideal for larger air-cooled V Twin engines."

Oil threads huh :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I don't think you could go wrong using any 20-50 motorcycle type oil.
Spectro, Motul, Castrol 4T, Repsol or any of the manufacturers brands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,174 Posts
Is there a 20/50 oil with high ZDDP content readily available in England? If so, what is it called? I'd rather get something from a normal shop than something I have to send off for - anything that fits the bill sold in car spares supermarkets/Halfords etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
I don't think you could go wrong using any 20-50 motorcycle type oil.
Yes you can. There are fundamentally two types of 20w-50 oil. High detergent and low detergent.

Low Detergent. This is the original type of oil. Detergents were not around and contaminents (primarily carbon blow by passed the piston rings) was allowed to settle out in the sump, "Filtration" was by means of a mesh filter. Oil life was short and oil changes needed every 1000 or so miles. This applied to both cars and bikes. All Triumph twins were like this, remember these bikes were designed in the mid 30's. These oils are often referred to as "Classic" 20w/50.

High Detergent With the advent of cartridge type in line filters, filtration improved immensly. At the same time oil technology improved and additives became the norm. This lead to the intrduction of detergents into the oil so that the carbon deposites were held in suspension and carried to the filter where the deposites were removed. This lead to cleaner engines and much longer oil life. Modern 20w-50 oils are of this type.

If you use a high detergent oil in an old style engine, what happens is that instead of the carbon particles settling out, they are carried round and round the engine, the contamination building up and up so degrading the oil very quickly. The contaminates only being removed when the oil is changed.

It is not the make of oil that is important. It is the detergent level that is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
Is there a 20/50 oil with high ZDDP content readily available in England?
I believe that larger Halfords do an "Classic" low detergent 20w/50 oil.

Incidentally, as far as I can find out, this "high ZDDP" is a bit of a red herring, at least as far as our classic bikes are concerned. These bikes have been around since the mid 30's when oil was just oil and do not seem to have come to any harm. The Gamba document is quite interesting but primarily refers to modern motorcycles amd is therefore of only limited value to classic British bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,989 Posts
Is there a 20/50 oil with high ZDDP content readily available in England? If so, what is it called? I'd rather get something from a normal shop than something I have to send off for - anything that fits the bill sold in car spares supermarkets/Halfords etc?
See my post #7 page 1 and click the link.
I did a bit of research and the results for this oil were good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Is there a 20/50 oil with high ZDDP content readily available in England? If so, what is it called? I'd rather get something from a normal shop than something I have to send off for - anything that fits the bill sold in car spares supermarkets/Halfords etc?
I used Unipart 20/50 for my first couple of oil changes (changed 2nd time mainly because I was having carb issues and didn't want to contaminate the oil too much), now I am using Morris Classic 20/50 which is available on the net but also an "old school" bike shop not too far away stocks it at just over £20 for 5 ltrs if he stocks it I should imagine there must be others around...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,174 Posts
See my post #7 page 1 and click the link.
I did a bit of research and the results for this oil were good.
Thanks Caulky, but how do I do this? Could you post a link, or give instructions on how to find this thread, or say which oil you mean? Cheers.

Thanks also epynt and tribsa - this whole mine thing is an oilfield (or is it the other way round?). The Morris oil sounds a fair deal at £4/litre, maybe I'll look for that locally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
oils for Tigers

I just chased this myself for my 1971 TR6R and received a reply from Penrite. Their recommendation is MC 4 ST a 15W50 Mineral oil designed for wet clutches. It's available in Australia from Supercheap stores - about $39 for 4L. I have also added an inline filter and a magnet onto the sump plate
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top