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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at buying a new bike this spring and really like the Sprint as I'm into doing lots of weekend rides and will be touring the east coast of Canada this year: New Brunswick, PEI, Nova Scotia then drop into Maine before heading back to Montreal Quebec. Anyways, point is, I love the Sprint but just don't fit on it so well...legs are crunched up too much...The Tiger on the other hand is a very comfy bike, or so it seems. My question is, is it a capable touring bike? Also is spending an extra $1000 for the center stand worth it? Any other pointers/ advice would be appreciated!
 

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The Tiger is the perfect tourer as it is so comfortable,relaxed and capable. I've completed 3 major European tours 2 up and the bike has been perfect. the 1050 Tiger is more capable,albeit the luggage is not as good. For solo it is great,2 up you need to try it out.
 

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It's a GREAT tourer, although I marginally prefer my '07 Sprint for the really long runs (but then I'm only 5'8").
Centre stand deffo makes servicing easier. It's next on the list for my '08 Tiger (std on the Sprint)
ABS (for me = a must) if you can run to the extra $$$
Scott oiler (or similar)
Fenda extenda. Front mud guard looks really short at the back to me. I got one to give a bit more protection to the rads.
Consider luggage carefully. The Triumph aftermarket solid boxes aren't everyone's cup of tea.
 

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I assume you're talking about the 1050 rather than the 955i. I don't know the 1050 but I believe its something of a variant on the 955i.
Given that, yes, it makes a very good touring bike especially if you want to venture onto dirt roads. If you have no interest in rough back roads or dirt roads I might think about something a little more touring oriented for myself but you may think otherwise.
The bike is smooth, apparently reliable, gets good mileage and has good ergos. The 955i could use a better seat, not sure of the 1050. It could also use a different windscreen, which seems to be a common source of complaint.
 

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I lived in Fredericton, NB from 2004 to end 2007 and rode my 1969/70 Triumph Tiger 500 everywhere. I can tell you one thing, with the exception of the fast and smooth trans-Canada, the roads are bloody awful, so you'll appreciate the new Tiger's long suspension travel. You definitely want to get off the trans-Canada as well, since the best sites are along the rivers and ocean, bay of fundy.

Here's one place that's often overlooked by those rushing to get to Cape Breton and the Cabot Trail. When you cross from from NB into NS, or from NS to NB take the road from Truro to Parrsboro instead of racing to Amherst. It's a wonderful road, with lots of twisties along open ocean cliffs, and it's smooth, here's the link to the map route http://tinyurl.com/8v8e9a
 

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Touring Tiger.....Yep sure is!

Hi Devillock:) I guess you could probably say I'll be a little bias here with my view on whether the 1050 Tiger makes a good tourer.....because in my view, our 08 Tiger is simply the BEST touring bike around, a lot of bang for your buck! We previously had a ST sprint for 4 years and absolutely loved this bike for 2up long distance touring, but this new Tiger is just better for chewing up the miles effortlessly. We've had it now for just 12 months and we've taken it to the MotoGP Phillip Island...4,500 klms round trip, putting in 600-700k days back to back, no probs, other trips we've done have resulted in the bike having covered 17,000 klms now, all done 2up fully loaded with the Triumph 3 panniers set and tank bag. It's a magnificent bike all round, we run Pirelli Diablos Stradas on it and get 9-10,000 klms out of a rear, more from the front. It scatches around the twisties with the best of them, our usual riding buddies are on Speed triples and street triples, Sprints and the occasional Ducatti and we're always there in the lead pack. It just happily responds with magnificent handling to whatever you ask it to do. We have spent some serious dollars outfitting our Tiger, so at a moments notice we're ready to explore the country. Without doubt, aquiring a centre stand is your first accessory that you MUST have, here's a website you can visit for great prices www.motoraddgarage.com.au We have fitted the following also, which to us is pretty much standard gear if you're going to do some serious touring....... a MRA Vario Touring Screen, front mudguard extension, radiator guard ( we fashion our own on all our bikes) Nautilus compact horn ( sounds like a mac truck for those times when you really need to be heard) rear hugger,tail mudguard ( they send them with the bike and according to the dealers no-one puts them on, but we did and it sure saves your pillion getting a wet tush in the pouring rain) ventura head light protectors, oggy knobs ( only come in handy if it accidentally falls, but it sure saves the vitals, ie gear lever etc) and Triumph handguards ( great for the chilly winds) Won't keep your hands dry but keeps the wind off and that's half the battle in cold weather, we've taken it through snow and didn't have heated grips! The bike has a great storage area under the seat also for the necessities, ie puncture repair kit, first aid kit ,manual and extra maps. It has a 20 litre tank and we get around 350-370 klms out of a tank Not bad! considering it's always 2up and loaded.The only thing wrong with owning a Tiger is that you're never home long enough to have any other pets! GET ONE ....YOU'LL NEVER REGRET IT.... Happy exploring to you :ClapHappy::photos:
 

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I reckon the Tiger 1050 tours. I have done 3500 miles in Europe - motorways to gravel strewn mountain passes. Northern Ireland, England, Holland, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Corsica, France. I camp as I tour so I take a tent and all the kit.

Like all bikes it has some limitations.

- Don't bother with the Triumph panniers. They are too small, rubbish shape and the closing mechnism is useless. I use Trax alu boxes. They fit a packet of gear and you can organise the gear well. I don't use a top box but use an ortlib across the pannier seat. I also have luggage hooks on the number plate mounts.

- The fairing might be a consideration when deciding between a Sprint and a Tiger. The wind/rain protection on a 1050 in my opinion is not as good as a Tiger 955. Then consider the screen, my preference would be the Triumph touring screen. I have the Givi touring screen but I reckon its too much in a cross wind. Its working it way up my list of changes

- I don't have a centre stand. The only time I would really use this is to oil the chain. I have just had a Scottoiler fitted.

As to my preference. I like the Sprint but I am totally biased towards the Tiger. Either way I don't think you can go far wrong.

As to your trip. I just wish I was doing it myself.

Do let us know the result of your deliberations and when the time comes we want pics from your trip

Lil
 

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Did you say $1000 for the center stand? twistedthrottle.com carries one for the Tiger for $155US, the Triumph site shows theirs is $225US. Personally, I think the center stand is very handy.
 

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Triumph re-designed the 1050 Tiger to be a tourer, rather than a road/offroad machine. (That's not to say you couldn't do it, if you wanted to). That's the reason I bought one - every review I found said that, as a tourer, it worked very well, with excellent suspension, handling and the engine is just magic with its wide spread of torque.

As for accessories, the skies the limit. Many don't like the Triumph panniers, but there are also many who do (mine were supplied as standard so I'm happy with them). Then there are tankbags, rear seatbags, top cases or rear racks and bags (Ventura) if you don't want a top case.

A centrestand will make life much easier (I assume your $1000 is a typo, shouldn't be anywhere near that!).

Probably the single biggest issue people have is with the screen. Some are happy with the stock item, but most aren't. The problem is that there are so many variables to consider that there is no easy answer, no one-size-fits-all! Until you ride it, however, you won't know if it will work for you.

So, in a nutshell, yes, it is most definitely a tourer :D.

ps check out www.tiger1050.com and do a search on screens, but I warn you it's not for the faint-hearted.
 

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I took a trip (2685 miles total) with my son this past summer. He rides an '08 Sprint ST, and I ride an '07 Tiger 1050. We had time constraints on the outbound leg and had to do two 600 mile days to get to our destination on time. I made the trip just fine on the Tiger and did not feel tired after the 600 mile days. My son who is 32 yrs. young said his shoulders bothered him due to the riding position on the Sprint ST.

The panniers on the Sprint hold a little more because both panniers are the same size inside while the right side one on the Tiger 1050 is smaller due to the silencer.

If Triumph had not changed the Tiger to make it more of a road bike, I would probably have gone for a Japanese Sport tourer.
 

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The Sprints bags are included and the Tigers are $900 and are smaller and $400 xtra for the top box. Plus the tigers widely know short comings. The Tiger does have a comfy seat ( for me ) If I could do it over I would get a SPRINT. Sure you can travel on it
 

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I've had 2 955 Sprints (keep the 01 just 'cause it's GREEN) and an 05 Sprint. Like them all, but, at 58yrs old my 07 Tiger is much more comfortable. Less wind protection than the Sprints but also less heat on your legs in slow/city traffic. 5000 mi trip on the Tiger this summer with 3 consecutive 600+ mile days and no ibuprofin for the entire trip. I couldn't have done it on my Sprints.

I've got 4 windscreens for the Tiger and none are as good as my double bubble on the Sprint. Cal-Sci +7 for cold/wet weather, cut down stock for hot weather, MRA Vario for "whenever" and the stock one which is no good in any condition. Your height/torso length will be the determining factor.

The factory bags aren't as good as they should be for the price but I can live with them.

YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #13
panniers

Tks for all the replies! I'm definitely set on getting an '08 Tiger this spring, my next question is dd I buy the panniers that come with it or go aftermarket? They look nice but seem a little small. Also been reading some iffy reviews about them, whats the consensus amongst you guys?
 

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I forgot to mention, one other thing you might want to seriously consider are crash bars (to protect the engine when you drop it!). And you will drop it, sooner or later, and the moment that happens the bars will have paid for themselves!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Don't worry, was on my to get list...Already dropped my Honda Shadow Saber, and slid out once...who would of thought that the tank on that bike is $1200can....love bikes but damn are the parts expensive!
 

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Two things I would recommend doing before riding the new Tiger much: 1) Take the shift linkage off and use lock-tight on the threads of the ball pivots. They have the habit of coming loose and are a bear to put back together beside the road. Once a thread locker is used, the problem should be cured. 2) Change the coolant and flush the system BEFORE you get 3000 miles or six months on the new bike. You won't believe the crap that Triumph puts in the coolant system. You will probably see a jelly looking crud in the coolant when you drain and flush. If you wait any longer than six months, you will probably have to remove the overflow tank to get all the crud cleaned out of that tank. This is not a problem just for Tigers--its a problem for all liquid cooled Triumphs.
 

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Ride on the right ?

But seriously, there's other good threads that list things to take or not take. I found them really useful, even though I'm a regular European tourer. My additional 2 penneth...
1. Watch the first roundabout and the first new morning start. After that it gets easier.
2. Travel light.
3. Take out AA European cover or similar.
4. Get travel insurance.
5. Carry a puncture kit. I've got one like BMW/AA/RAC use, but a nice Yamaha dealer in Austria used one that was like the old red licourice laces when I punctured on the Grosse Glockner. I was well impressed and will invest in one of those type as soon as I can find one.
6. Avoid motorways. They're dead boring and not why you tour on a bike.
7. Plan ahea
d.
8. Depending on your route, prepare for very different temperatures.
9. Take lots of breaks. My rule of thumb is 100miles max between stops.
10.Fill your tank each time it gets down to 50% It's no fun searching for a service station when you're down to fumes. Ask how I know !!
11.Take spare keys and the alarm override plug thingy.
12.Wear cheap teeshirts under your jacket and throw the dirty one away each evening.
13. Watch out for "light flashing etiquet". We flash to say "OK, you can go", or "thanks". They flash to say "get out of my way" or "I'm about to wipe you out"
14. Most important.....Enjoy yourself.

Just one more... I have no problem converting to riding on the RHS, but often get phased about a week after coming back to Blighty and LHS riding/driving, getting a sudden panic that I'm on the wrong side. Strange eh ?
 

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R
7. Plan ahea
d.
Tee hee.

Just one more... I have no problem converting to riding on the RHS, but often get phased about a week after coming back to Blighty and LHS riding/driving, getting a sudden panic that I'm on the wrong side. Strange eh ?
Happens to me as well. I also find most trips involve one wrong-side mistake. If I could add a couple regarding that issue:

- Try to use filling stations etc on the RHS of the road rather than the left as with the latter it's so easy to pull out on the wrong side.

- be careful with one way streets in towns as you can easily slip back into riding on the left.

Mind you, as the original poster is from Canada I doubt this advice is much use unless he's going on a very long tour......
 

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Mind you, as the original poster is from Canada I doubt this advice is much use unless he's going on a very long tour......[/QUOTE]

Ah!!... didn't see that. Anyway, was answering giantbutcherdog and he's in Guernsey. Good one about filling stations. Didn't think of that.

John
 
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