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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone recommend a toolset for working on a Bonnie? Craftsman or something similar? I am trying to get most of the tools I need to work on the bike with a set so I don't have to buy too many pieces one at a time :)
 

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Snap-On makes great stuff, and Craftsman isn't bad. Go for 6 point rather than 12 point sockets - you'll do less damage with the 6 pointers.
 

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Well I used the advanced search function and searched for "tool" in thread titles only, in Twins Tech Talk, and found many discussions.
Here are 4 good ones:

1

2

3

4

:) -K
 

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Good to have a small set of Torx bits with these Bonnevilles, etc. The seemingly random things that are mounted with Torx, such as the ht coil and one of the two bolts holding the chain guard on...???? Strange stuff!
 

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I find that I can do 95% of the maintenance on the bonnie (carb stuff, pipe stuff, suspension, oil & filters, brake stuff) with the following:

- 12pc metric hex/allen key set
- approx 40pc metric socket set
- 12 pc metric wrench set
- 10 pc mechanic's screwdriver set
- "light" torque wrench (really just need the heavy torque wrench for sprocket & axle work)

There are a few specialty tools you'll pick up along the way like feeler gauges, brake bleeding kit, long 18mm "thin" socket for plugs but I don't consider this stuff part of my regular tool kit.

Almost all my stuff is Craftsman and I've never had a problem. If you wait for the special sales Sears has you can get this stuff pretty cheap. Pick up a decent tool storage box while you're at it. No sense putting new tools in a crappy, crowded old drawer.

Hope this helps.

P
 

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Craftsman on sale is a good deal; Kobalt (Lowe's) seems to be of similar quality. You'll need 19, 22, and 24mm wrenches and sockets in addition to the smaller sizes.

Aside from the obvious tools, I've found the following to be essential:

A regular-length and a long screwdriver handle with the usual bits, as well as a set of metric Allen (hex) bits for it, and a set of Torx bits. A set of metric nutdriver bits is an added bonus. You can find various sets of these bits in the Ace Hardware cheap tool bargain bin.

Good-quality metric Allen and Torx bits for your ratchet, also to use with your torque wrench.

Several extension bars of various lengths for your ratchet.

A mini-ratchet, which can be used with the screwdriver bits.

An inspection mirror.

A 24mm six-point (impact) socket and bar to use on your axle nuts; it chews them up less than 12-point wrenches or sockets.

A rubber-headed mallet.

A telescoping magnetic pick-up tool.
 

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Fork caps are 22mm.
 

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Tool Roll

I believe I saw that bad boy in a pic. Do you like to completely disassemble your bike on trips. Man, that's some tool pouch. Do you tape it to your jack and pull it behind your bike? :LaughAtYou:

Just kidding. You never know what you'll need or when your gonna need it. I leave the tools at home and carry a cell phone. To tell you the truth, I'm lost on these bikes without the manual.

That young man wanting to know what tool kit to buy also needs a jack and a manual. That jack will save you lots of money and pay for itself. I paid for mine by saving the labor on installing my new progressive springs on my forks. Little did I know that was only the start. Gonna get expensive.

everybody have a great day-----Frank











craftsman aluminum jack is a must have.
 

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I believe I saw that bad boy in a pic. Do you like to completely disassemble your bike on trips. Man, that's some tool pouch. Do you tape it to your jack and pull it behind your bike? :LaughAtYou:

Just kidding. You never know what you'll need or when your gonna need it. I leave the tools at home and carry a cell phone. To tell you the truth, I'm lost on these bikes without the manual.
No I don't completely disassemble my bike on trips but I used to be a boy scout. :p

Don't need a jack the bike has a centre stand. :D

Can't rely on cell phones in remote areas in Australia and on my last trip I carried the Haynes manual as well as a can of slime, a can of chain lube, shop rags and a few other odds and sods. Didn't use any of it except the chain lube of course but that's the way I like it. ;)
 

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An aside about the fork caps ...

... a 12-point 22mm wrench is not the best tool for these aluminum parts. I prefer a 6-point wrench or 6-point socket to minimize the nicks on the aluminum, or at least the open end of the spanner. You will nick it unless you go to great lengths to avoid doing so.

Also, the nearby clamp bolts should be loosened before loosening or tightening the caps--the threads in the aluminum are fine and soft.
 

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Hey Aussie

No offense meant. I think you have a great idea for having all the bases covered. I'm used to riding on the outskirts of houston, Texas, not the Australian outback.
If something serious broke, I probably wouldn't be able to fix it.
Off the subject, I've dodged a few deer on the way home from work, any problems over there with the Roos? I'ld hate to meet a 5 foot kangaroo on the road.
Have you got any pics posted of the countryside over there. Like to see the terrain you're driving in. Maybe you have some posted on another site.

Sorry for straying off the subject at hand on that fellows tool kit. Everybody have a great day- Frank
 

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No offense meant. I think you have a great idea for having all the bases covered. I'm used to riding on the outskirts of houston, Texas, not the Australian outback.
If something serious broke, I probably wouldn't be able to fix it.
Off the subject, I've dodged a few deer on the way home from work, any problems over there with the Roos? I'ld hate to meet a 5 foot kangaroo on the road.
Have you got any pics posted of the countryside over there. Like to see the terrain you're driving in. Maybe you have some posted on another site.

Sorry for straying off the subject at hand on that fellows tool kit. Everybody have a great day- Frank
No offense taken, I know a friendly jibe when I see one. :D

I haven't done any riding in the Aussie outback yet, well not strictly speaking anyway, but you don't have to be in the outback here to be out of cell phone range as even some of our major highways don't have 100% cell phone coverage. Once you are away from major population centres cell phone coverage can be quite patchy even along the coast but particularly inland.

Kangaroo's and wallabies can be a problem on our country roads particularly at night and particularly during the dry season as they come to the road verge after the green pick but the animal you don't want to hit here is a wild pig and we have quite a few of those here in the north. Luckily they are found mostly on country highways and back roads and not so much on our major coastal highways. Some of them are "not small".



I've got quite a few images I've taken on rides and intend to do a ride report of a recent trip I did as soon as I can find the time but for now this one will have to do.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I do have a Motorcycle Jack and some tools already. I am going to do a Airbox Removal, new pipes, etc work and I needed some tool advice. One thing I'm looking for is a cheap D tool for the carbs.
 
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