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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok. I've played around with my front fork since I purchased my T100. After installing the 11-1126 Progressive fork springs, and playing around with with fork oil wt and volume until I got things about as good as they could be ...... guess what? Now I'm anxiously awaiting my Ricor Intiminators! So, it's off with the forks once again .... sort of starting all over on the front end.

Do any of you other guys ever get to the point where you say to yourself .... 'why don't I just leave things alone ...?' I'm fairly well satisfied with how the front end works now. Do I really want to start over, playing with pre load, and fork oil levels? Am I actually going to turn this sweet little bike into a British BMW R100GS?

I'm going to do the work, but I just wondered if you sometimes question where you're going with this ...........??? Maybe I'm just getting lazy!

Bob
 

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I've installed Progressives in, thinking here, 3 or 4 of my previous bikes (the biggest improvements in a Suzuki Bandit 1200 and VX-800). In the back of my mind, it's been a backburner project for my T100. Did they just not work out?
 

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Bob, I know exactly how you feel, and on the same topic to boot. I went Ikons instead of Progressives, but I've been messing with them for six months now and frankly, I still haven't found the point I like, although now they're okay if not great. I'm seriously considering Intiminators, but there's that nagging voice in my head that points out I rode the bike for 11,000 miles, on two long trips, with the stock shock setup with no complaints (not even a stiff back after 1250 miles in two days), and maybe I'd have been better leaving it alone.

It happens on any vehicle - I'm perfectly happy with it as the factory delivers it, but then as I start messing with it I start realizing what's wrong with it. As I learn, it's sort of a Genesis thing, with the biting the fruit and realizing I'm naked. Part of me wishes I were the kind of person who could just leave it alone and pay a mechanic too much to do it for me - if I knew literally *nothing* about the bike, I'd just enjoy it and not worry. But that's not me, and I've done roadside repairs on other people's bikes too much to really believe ignorance is bliss.

I've found that I don't really understand something until I tear into it - I don't *know* the sections of the bike that I haven't worked on (such as the cams, the only service I've paid to have done). Once I *know* a section, it's always in my head - but then I waste a lot of energy on rides worrying about if what I just felt might be a problem with the last thing I did, etc. But then, that heightened state of awareness if what a bike's all about.

I know, I got pretty tangential there, but I've been thinking a *lot* about this recently, thanks to my suspension. I trust I'll get it sorted soon, in time to move on to worrying about carb jetting (I adjusted the idle mixture screws for the first time tonight, after feeling like I'm a hair lean for two years)!
 

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Ha! Nice one Lindsay - I share your pain. Just took out the snorkel, fitted a Unifilter and played with the carb screw for the first time and am now wondering if I've done the right thing or not! A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but a forum full of knowledge and an incompetent fool is infinitely worse! As long as I don't end up fritzing my bike, I'll be a happy camper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've installed Progressives in, thinking here, 3 or 4 of my previous bikes (the biggest improvements in a Suzuki Bandit 1200 and VX-800). In the back of my mind, it's been a backburner project for my T100. Did they just not work out?
I think the Progressive springs did exactly what I wanted them to do ... the bike is extremely stable on the twisties. My biggest issue with the Triumph front end was and is the amount of harsh feedback into my wrists and elbows on a bumpy stretch of highway .... especially if running Interstate speeds. I have to believe this issue is caused by the damping rod system used on the Triumph forks, and hopefully the Intiminators will reduce the harshness. I will first try them with the stock springs and slightly shortened spacer (per Ricor).

Bob
 

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Hey Bob, be interested to hear what you think of the intiminators vs progressive springs. I just put the intiminators in a couple of weeks ago and they've made a vast improvement to the front end, but that was compared with stock. Unfortunately, it's now shown up the rear end. Am thinking of sticking some YSS shocks on the back, if they ever get round to replying to my emails. They must be doing really well - I've never come across a company less interested in taking my cash!

Cheers
bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey Bob, be interested to hear what you think of the intiminators vs progressive springs. I just put the intiminators in a couple of weeks ago and they've made a vast improvement to the front end, but that was compared with stock. Unfortunately, it's now shown up the rear end. Am thinking of sticking some YSS shocks on the back, if they ever get round to replying to my emails. They must be doing really well - I've never come across a company less interested in taking my cash!

Cheers
bob
Bob,
I'll post a report once I install them. Here's the plan so far.
- go back to stock springs
- install Intiminators
- install Thruxton preload caps ... (purchased from a good riding buddy at good price).
If I understand the principle of the Intiminators, they (a) use an inertia valve that will keep the bike level under heavy braking, but will quickly allow fork oil to 'blow by' thru a "comfort circuit" when a bump is encountered at speed, and (b) the use of 5W fork oil pretty much disables the Triumph dampers, since it will easily flow thru the Triumph damper tube orifices.

If the Intiminators do their job, I can still see having to play with the springing .... hopefully, the Thrux adjusters will let me tune the spring preload without having to noodle around with various size preload spacers. I'm fine with the rear suspension, since I replaced the stock units with Progressive 440s that apparently use a similar inertia valve system.

In my opinion, the Bonneville is an exceptional all around road motorcycle, hampered only by the budget OEM suspension.
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Lindsay, glad to hear there's someone else out there who goes through the same thought process when considering an improvement.

Bob
 

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Bob, I know exactly how you feel, and on the same topic to boot. I went Ikons instead of Progressives, but I've been messing with them for six months now and frankly, I still haven't found the point I like, although now they're okay if not great. I'm seriously considering Intiminators, but there's that nagging voice in my head that points out I rode the bike for 11,000 miles, on two long trips, with the stock shock setup with no complaints (not even a stiff back after 1250 miles in two days), and maybe I'd have been better leaving it alone.

It happens on any vehicle - I'm perfectly happy with it as the factory delivers it, but then as I start messing with it I start realizing what's wrong with it. As I learn, it's sort of a Genesis thing, with the biting the fruit and realizing I'm naked. Part of me wishes I were the kind of person who could just leave it alone and pay a mechanic too much to do it for me - if I knew literally *nothing* about the bike, I'd just enjoy it and not worry. But that's not me, and I've done roadside repairs on other people's bikes too much to really believe ignorance is bliss.

I've found that I don't really understand something until I tear into it - I don't *know* the sections of the bike that I haven't worked on (such as the cams, the only service I've paid to have done). Once I *know* a section, it's always in my head - but then I waste a lot of energy on rides worrying about if what I just felt might be a problem with the last thing I did, etc. But then, that heightened state of awareness if what a bike's all about.

I know, I got pretty tangential there, but I've been thinking a *lot* about this recently, thanks to my suspension. I trust I'll get it sorted soon, in time to move on to worrying about carb jetting (I adjusted the idle mixture screws for the first time tonight, after feeling like I'm a hair lean for two years)!
One of the best posts I have ever read capturing the confict of modifying one aspect of motorcycle performance which invariably compromises the performance of another aspect. If you take the dive, you pay the price but hopefully come out in the end with the desired result but not without a lot of soul searching if not second guessing and a better understanding of the same tradeoffs the engineers considered during development. Generally increasing the price target of components can improve overall performance though and the limiting aspect of most designs.
George
 

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I put the Ricor Intiminators in my Scrambler forks several weeks ago. Left the stock springs and cut off the preload spacers to compensate for the thickness of the Intiminators. They did relieve a lot of the harshness in the front end. I wouldn't say they totally eliminate brake dive, but it is reduced nicely. Overall, I like them.
 

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I've modified nothing about my Bonneville, other than adding a centerstand, low grab bar, and EBC HH brake pads. The bike had a classic look, ran perfectly, and handled well right off of the showroom floor, which is why I bought it after not having ridden in 25 years.

Any performance gains from modifications would have been marginal at best, given the bike's displacement and 450 lb. dry weight. The bike remains a delight to ride to this day, and I have no modifier's regrets.
 

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not touching mine

the only thing i,ve done so far is new norm hyde pipes and fairing for long rides.future add ons will be stand,saddle bags/boxes.and i think im gonna try adjusting rear shocks.i think the manufacturer engineers and designers now more about bikes than most people.my mechanic father of 50 years experience says dont muck with engine,carb,etc.besides doesn,t more horsepower usually means less gas mileage?
 
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