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Discussion Starter · #41 · (Edited)
Got some oil on the engine that I'll have to look into. Looks like a leak showing its head on the pan:



And then the usual mystery leak behind the front sprocket cover. I've already fixed this and I think it just showed up again very recently (yes, I have a new boot for the shift elbow).



Anyway, time to take off the swingarm to clean it up and replace the chain slider block. I knew it was worn, but didn't know the profile of a new one to see how worn it really was.



Think it was worn??!!:



Got the swingarm off:





All the bearings and dust seals look good:



I ran the bike without a rear mudguard alot over the past few years, and now that the swingarm is off I can see the damaged it did to the finishes. The hugger will be saying on from here on out. Cleaned up and ready to go:



The new Penske rear shock should show up in the next few weeks, so I'll dig in further then.

More to come as I progress...
 

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<...>Does anybody have suggestions for a permanant fix to the seat lock? I've replaced the insides twice and the plastic parts keep breaking so I've been running a bit ghetto with a zip tie strapped to the cable...
What I did with the Trident (from memory, possibly faded) was zip tie the cable to the subframe, out of sight, and leave the lock in place with the cable disconnected. If you knew where to find the cable end, you just pulled on it to unlock the seat. If you didn't know, it just looked like a regular locked seat.

Rear brake works... but from the looks of it could probably use an overhaul. I haven't overhauled brakes before, so I'm not sure what I'll need or where to get the parts.<...>
Front brakes should be looked at too.
I did a write-up on overhauling the Tokicos here:

http://www.triumphrat.net/sprint-forum/162751-brake-caliper-rebuild-tokico-6-pots.html

The rear caliper is a one-piece unit with pistons on one side only. Pretty simple, but start spraying some PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench on the pad retaining pins a few days before you start.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Rear brake you will probably need to strip, you may want to fit new seals the dust seals are the ones that go, pop the mounting bracket off the caliper and clean out the holes for the slider pins, clean them too...once you have the pistons out clean them any stubborn dirt etc can be gently rubbed back with 1500 grade paper. I fitted stainless pins to mine but being good old blighty they do get a harder life. If you find ally corrosion behind the seals I find popping the caliper into a low oven for 10 mins or so has it powdering off with very little effort ;-) 6 pots if in good nick you may get away without doing most of the seals you will only know when apart ! or you could just pump the pistons out a little and clean up with a toothbrush and rags etc..like here http://www.mottleybiker.com/page27.htm

Oh and as Kit says prepare yourself for the pad pins..if you have a few allen keys try all of them to get the best fit you can.

Cheers
Mot
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Well luckily enough the pad pins came right out. I had to put some effort into it, but they came out without trouble. Everything looked good in there actually, a few marks on the exposed part of the pistons, but nothing that really gets past the seals. Both the dust an d inner seals were in good shape. I cleaned everything up and put it all back together the way it was. If anything, the brake fluid was dirty and needed to be replaced.



 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Does anybody have a good source for a carb rebuild kit? I figure I might as well replace some pieces while I have them apart for cleaning.
 

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I ran the bike without a rear mudguard alot over the past few years, and now that the swingarm is off I can see the damaged it did to the finishes. The hugger will be saying on from here on out. Cleaned up and ready to go:



The new Penske rear shock should show up in the next few weeks, so I'll dig in further then.

More to come as I progress...
Travis - daft question for you, but is your swingarm anodized or painted? I was convinced it was an anodized alloy part, but mine has started to flake bits of what look uncommonly like paint!

Thanks in advance


Trev
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Travis - daft question for you, but is your swingarm anodized or painted? I was convinced it was an anodized alloy part, but mine has started to flake bits of what look uncommonly like paint!

Thanks in advance


Trev
Anodized- I'd assume they all were from the factory.

Took the water pump out, all was good. Removed the alternator, and found what I thought I was going to find- a loose drive.



I replaced the alternator a year ago, and the used one I put in was welded when I bought it. The weld didn't even last 3k miles. This was causing a chattering when at idle, which would go away with any added electrical draw like pressing the rear brake pedal. Hoping one of the mechanics at work can take a look at it tomorrow and either promise a better weld job or another solution.

Time to check valve clearances. After removing the coils, I started pulling the spark plug leads. Lead #3 was SOAKED in oil.



When I pulled the valve cover gasket off, the source of the leak was apparent. The individual gasket for that plug hole was nowhere to be found! I'm truely clueless on what happened. At first I thought it just fell off when I removed the valve cover, but the plug lead was soaked prior to me doing that. Is it possible that the gasket hasn't been in place since I last had the valve cover off about 10k miles ago? The spark plug was still in place, but only finger tight. Think that could contribute to my no-starting issues?

Took a look at everything and it all looked good- no sign of chewed up rubber bits.



Kinda neat to see the mfg. date scribed into the cam cap.



Moved on to checking the valve/shim clearances- four inlets are off but all the exhausts are within spec. I don't have the shim removal tool, so I'll pull the camshafts next time to measure and see what new shim sizes I need (and where to get them).



Its coming along...
 

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IIRC, you can get carb kits from Sprint Mfg., but not from the usual places like Sirius, K&L, etc. Maybe Sudco?

That spark plug gasket could have gone missing a while back. I, umm, I have this friend, you see, who forgot one and didn't notice for 6,000 miles...

Since the intakes are closing up, and the two good ones are right on the edge, and you're taking the cams out anyway... If it were me, this is a case where I would go ahead and put all six intakes back as close to 0.15 as possible.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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I disagree there kit :)

The spec is .15 to .2 for exhaust clearances. All of those are in spec. The point being that Triumph state that .15 is in spec at the service interval inspection, which must mean you can button up & come back again in 12,000 miles. In other words, Triumph anticipate that there is some level below .15 which is acceptable, but starting at .15, they don't expect it would drop to an unacceptable level within the 12k miles. Seem logical?

In practice, once the bike has done 10k or 20k miles, the rate of clearance loss - effectively valve seat settle/wear - tends to drop. So there's even less need to set at the high end of the tolerance. (Tho' this may not remain true at very high mileages.)

From the point of view of mechanical hammering at the valve stem/cam/shim interface & cam shaft drive system, the smallest gap that ensures valve closure when hot is best. So if .2 really isn't needed, which I suggest in Triumph's own terms it almost certainly isn't - at least beyond the initial, say, 10k settle in period of the motor - then .15 is likely to be better for the engine.

I wouldn't change any of those exhaust clearances. And on the intake side, I'd leave the .102s & try to reset the rest between .1 & .125, whatever is most convenient for swapping round the shims in place or in my spares box already.

Last time I checked the valves on mine, I didn't need to reset any (& I'd done them the previous interval so knew where they started). I've noticed the intakes tend to lose clearance a little faster, generally, but intake clearances down to .025 don't seem to cause any problems. Tho' obviously they should be rest back to .1 minimum at the service interval.
 

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Sorry, I wasn't clear and I was looking at the wrong specs. I agree about not touching the exhaust valves, but given the evidence that the intakes have been closing up I would personally shoot for the loose end of spec on this one.

If this was at 12k, I would probably agree with you, but since it's at 38k it seems to me that the intake valves are still closing up. (And if the other four were still in spec, I would also leave them alone, but with the cams coming out anyway...)

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
I see where both of you are coming from re: shims. I've never adjusted the shims before, and I think I bought the bike with around 15k miles on it (I really don't remember...).

Several years ago I had the valve cover off with hopes of adjusting the shims (I think I recal one or two being barely out of spec) but I never actually changed them out. Not sure of the reason (was there a stripped bolt somewhere? hmmm...).

I have to read the manual on checking cam chain stretch while I'm in there.

The shop that I'm buying that Penske shock from called me over the weekend- the shock came in but its the wrong length. Seems that Penske has 372mm on file for this bike, compared to the 327mm that I measured. We found this error before ordering, and asked Penske to update their file to make sure they had the right length. No biggie, the shop believes that Penske will take it back and shorten it without question. I should have it next week at some point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Took the intake cam out and measured up the valve shims- got the sizes figured out and now I have to find a source for shims.

Checked the rear cam chain guide, all is good. Measured up the cam chain tensioner spring, all is good.

Removed the front brake lines (split system) in anticipation of my double lines coming next week.

Disassembled the front Tokico brakes, they were quite dirty and I may paint them anyway. I was just going to replace the seals but holy cow they aren't cheap! Brake pads are OK, could replace them now while I have everything apart I guess but I can't be bothered to search for pads.

Rear shock should be at my doorstep next week which will allow me to reassemble the rear end of the bike.

Dropped all the body parts (tank, side panels, rear panel, front fender, rear CF fender, seat cowl, radiator side covers, gauge cups) at a local body shop for paint. They probably won't get to them for a few weeks, but I'm in no real rush.
 

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Try any local, longstanding Honda shop.

All the early 80's CB models used the same shims (CB 750's, 900's, etc).
 

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Hi

Just read through the whole post and can offer a couple of things:

For the raised plastic Union Jacks I've bought these for the side panels on my Thunderbird Sport. They are a bit flexible so do the job well. Don't know if they are smaller than what you want though?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-M...73?pt=UK_Motorcycle_Parts&hash=item3efee55981

As regards the seat, you could get the one recovered that takes the cowl and then leave the cowl on all the time. And then use the other seat when you want to carry a pillion, which will be better because of the extra padding. Not my idea, the bike I'm getting (hopefully next week) has two seats because the owner wanted to avoid taking the cowl on and off and any possible wear to the seat sides when doing it - my kind of man!
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Tiger- I think I'm going to go your route with the seats. Get the original seat recoverd for use with the cowl, and save the other seat I have for the two-up days.

Chuck- I'll shoot you a message over the weekend with shim sizes to see if you have the ones I need.

Brake lines are on their way, Penske unit is waiting for me at the Fedex store for pickup! Hopefully I can start putting the front and rear ends of the bike back together this weekend.

Any suggestions for lighting improvements on the bike?
 

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Yes, heat is a concern but shouldn't be a problem in a large, glass light. I had a pair of 100/80s that I used for a decade, moving them from large round lights to small, rectangular quads to large rectangular lights with no problems in any. You'll also hear concerns with current draw and wire size but there were never any problems there either. Designing a dedicated circuit with a relay and large wire is fairly cheap and easy to do and it may actually help. I'll let the electrical engineers debate that one. To me electricity is smoke, let the smoke out of the wire and it will quit working.
 
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