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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently changed from 900 GT PRO to the 1200 GT PRO. I am very concerned about the issue of Mode changing. When you are on a ride and the road changes from sealed to gravel, you cannot change the On Road mode to Off Road without stopping. If you are in a group of riders, it is dangerous to stop unexpectedly, and as the road is rural, almost never any area to pull off the road. So leaving it in On Road mode on gravel, and the TC ( Traction Control ) starts kicking in. It is much more sensitive and powerful than I experienced on the 900. So much so, that it can and has actually stopped the bike while riding up a gravel hill going round a corner.

I have reported this to Triumph, through the dealer, and Triumph are responding to try different road modes, but they all do the same thing. The TC is simply too powerful to leave it in On Road mode when on gravel, and there is often nowhere to safely pull over on small rural roads.

Triumph say, the reason for not allowing mode change while moving is for safety. But they have made the bike more dangerous in the real world by not allowing the change while moving. Other bikes, eg Ducati, BMW, KTM all allow the off road mode change while moving.

A lot of the media articles and reviews mention that Triumph want to make this bike as good or better than the GS. Well if they don't fix this, they have totally failed due to this issue. I write this, as I was thinking about Ducati vs Triumph and BMW vs Triumph. This issue, had I known how much more control than the 900, would have affected my choice.

If anyone from Triumph reads this, please consider the real world, and remove this software flag that checks wheel movement before deciding whether you can choose Off Road / On Road mode changes. It is simply not necessary, and is dangerous the way it is.
 

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Tiger 1200 GT Explorer, 2022, white
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Sorry to hear that your disappointed with an otherwise great bike.
I think Triumph has made a conscious decision here:
How often will there be a road that goes into a gravel path without the option to stop and change riding mode VS what is the risk of people changing to off-road mode and back without a need to stop.

They made a choice to focus on the latter. It might be not to everybody's liking but I'm sure that Triumph has its reasons.

That being said, if this option is so important to you that not having it would have made you buy another bike, I think your test ride was not long enough. Or not over the right kind of road.

And I doubt that this one issue makes the Tiger 1200 a complete failure in competing with the GS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just about every major ride we go on is like that. Our country roads are narrow as you approach unsealed areas. We choose country roads, that is why we have adventure bikes. And, every ride includes my friends on Ducatis, and they can change to off road mode without stopping.

With regards to your comment about my test ride. It is not appropriate or fair, to take a demo off road. I had a 900 GT PRO for a year, and did not have the same problem, because the Traction Control was not as severe.

So it sounds like you are supporting Triumph, without the benefit of real world knowledge. Why would Ducati, BMW and KTM all allow this mode change without stopping, and Triumph are the only brand who don't, and they think they have it right. Well I am sorry, but it is definitely wrong. I saw someone else write in a forum, that this issue makes it a deal breaker. So its not just me.
 

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Tiger 1200 GT Explorer, 2022, white
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Well, I'm not a die hard Triumph fan that likes everything Triumph does. Triumph does make its fair share of mistakes.
But I think that for Triumph, the market is bigger than just NZ. And there will be more people buying an adventure bike without ever leaving the paved road than there are people leaving the paved road and making a big deal about having to stop to change to the off-road mode. Triumph tends to choose safety for the majority of their customers over inconvenience for a small group.

If the majority of the roads in your neck of the woods turns into gravel roads, going onto those roads during a test ride seems fair enough.

Do you think you and some person on another forum are reason for Triumph to change it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I'm not a die hard Triumph fan that likes everything Triumph does. Triumph does make its fair share of mistakes.
But I think that for Triumph, the market is bigger than just NZ. And there will be more people buying an adventure bike without ever leaving the paved road than there are people leaving the paved road and making a big deal about having to stop to change to the off-road mode. Triumph tends to choose safety for the majority of their customers over inconvenience for a small group.

If the majority of the roads in your neck of the woods turns into gravel roads, going onto those roads during a test ride seems fair enough.

Do you think you and some person on another forum are reason for Triumph to change it?
I am afraid you miss read me. The majority of roads in our area are not gravel, it is when we go for weekend rides, long distance, that we choose destinations out of the normal highway areas, where we come across gravel.

As far as a big deal, it is not so much that, but one of safety. My point is that in trying to be safe, Triumph have created a dangerous condition, where you either need to stop on the road where there is no space off the side, or continue in gravel and have the bike stop by itself when TC kicks in. Yes, in gravel, on a hill it will come to a complete stop and you can't do anything about it. How is that safe ?

I am interested in why you might think that making the rider stop when changing between On Road and Off Road is safer, when you can change between Rain and Sport, Rain and Road, Road and Sport all without stopping. There is more difference in the characteristics between Rain and Sport, than there is between say, Rain and Off Road.
 

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I am interested in why you might think that making the rider stop when changing between On Road and Off Road is safer, when you can change between Rain and Sport, Rain and Road, Road and Sport all without stopping. There is more difference in the characteristics between Rain and Sport, than there is between say, Rain and Off Road.
I'm guessing but I imagine they make the rider stop because you're disabling the TC, if that is the case, maybe the other bikes you mentioned have a more sophisticated IMU and off road TC settings that don't completely disable it, or their bikes are programmed to allow the change if the bikes are in a stable state without any wheelspin or slides.

Also I think some of the "European" manufacturer's. Aprilia, KTM etc, have always been a bit more relaxed than British & Japanese about TC/wheelie control etc, been able to switch things off on the fly and the bike not reverting back to the safest mode when switched off.
I've never owned a Tiger or ride off road, so all that may be nonsense though:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm guessing but I imagine they make the rider stop because you're disabling the TC, if that is the case, maybe the other bikes you mentioned have a more sophisticated IMU and off road TC settings that don't completely disable it, or their bikes are programmed to allow the change if the bikes are in a stable state without any wheelspin or slides.

Also I think some of the "European" manufacturer's. Aprilia, KTM etc, have always been a bit more relaxed than British & Japanese about TC/wheelie control etc, been able to switch things off on the fly and the bike not reverting back to the safest mode when switched off.
I've never owned a Tiger or ride off road, so all that may be nonsense though:p
It is a valid thought, but the Off Road mode still has TC, it is just at a different level, similar to Rain and Sport. They all have TC, just at different levels. Even if you turn off TC, you still can't get into Off Road mode while the wheels are turning. Of interest, even doing 1km/hr is enough to prevent the selection of Off Road mode. The bike has to be totally stationary.
 

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Tiger 1200 GT Explorer, 2022, white
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I am interested in why you might think that making the rider stop when changing between On Road and Off Road is safer, when you can change between Rain and Sport, Rain and Road, Road and Sport all without stopping. There is more difference in the characteristics between Rain and Sport, than there is between say, Rain and Off Road.
It's not about what I think. It's about what Triumph thinks. Although I can imagine that Triumph wants the rider to make a conscious decision when nearly completely switching off TC. Hence the need to stop the bike.
And the for the same reason:
If you put it in off-road or off-road Pro (on the Tiger Rally) and you switch off the bike, it automatically goes back to road mode.

Having owned a 1250GS I did notice that BMW doesn't care much about security though. For example: on the GS you can scroll through your phone book while driving. Whereas Triumph had disabled this (on the 1200 you can only scroll through the last numbers dialed but not the phone book). I think that is a tell tale on the security approach of both companies.
Maybe Triumph is more focused on security and BMW is the one not considering security enough.

Like I said (in different words) before: For most people, switching off TC by accident will be a bigger risk than having to stop to put the bike in off-road.

You have a different opinion, that's OK. But disqualifying the bike as a solid competitor for the GS based on this feature alone is, for me, a step too far.

Anyway, who goes riding with friends that have Ducati bikes anyway :rolleyes:
(just kidding!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's not about what I think. It's about what Triumph thinks. Although I can imagine that Triumph wants the rider to make a conscious decision when nearly completely switching off TC. Hence the need to stop the bike.
And the for the same reason:
If you put it in off-road or off-road Pro (on the Tiger Rally) and you switch off the bike, it automatically goes back to road mode.

Having owned a 1250GS I did notice that BMW doesn't care much about security though. For example: on the GS you can scroll through your phone book while driving. Whereas Triumph had disabled this (on the 1200 you can only scroll through the last numbers dialed but not the phone book). I think that is a tell tale on the security approach of both companies.
Maybe Triumph is more focused on security and BMW is the one not considering security enough.

Like I said (in different words) before: For most people, switching off TC by accident will be a bigger risk than having to stop to put the bike in off-road.

You have a different opinion, that's OK. But disqualifying the bike as a solid competitor for the GS based on this feature alone is, for me, a step too far.

Anyway, who goes riding with friends that have Ducati bikes anyway :rolleyes:
(just kidding!)
Those are good points, especially your last sentence..... Maybe we should have a software option for different countries. When it comes to accidentally changing to a mode with less TC, you can change from Rain to Sport, which is also a different TC, just like Rain to Off Road. I would much rather that change, than getting hit from behind because, either, I am stopping on the road to change modes, or the bike stops going up a gravel road because it decides the TC needs to kick in so strongly that it stops the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's not about what I think. It's about what Triumph thinks. Although I can imagine that Triumph wants the rider to make a conscious decision when nearly completely switching off TC. Hence the need to stop the bike.
And the for the same reason:
If you put it in off-road or off-road Pro (on the Tiger Rally) and you switch off the bike, it automatically goes back to road mode.

Having owned a 1250GS I did notice that BMW doesn't care much about security though. For example: on the GS you can scroll through your phone book while driving. Whereas Triumph had disabled this (on the 1200 you can only scroll through the last numbers dialed but not the phone book). I think that is a tell tale on the security approach of both companies.
Maybe Triumph is more focused on security and BMW is the one not considering security enough.

Like I said (in different words) before: For most people, switching off TC by accident will be a bigger risk than having to stop to put the bike in off-road.

You have a different opinion, that's OK. But disqualifying the bike as a solid competitor for the GS based on this feature alone is, for me, a step too far.

Anyway, who goes riding with friends that have Ducati bikes anyway :rolleyes:
(just kidding!)
I noticed in another thread, you have decided to sell your 1200.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your information is incomplete. But why this remark?
I was wondering that you were a bit critical of me due to the issue I was having with this bike. Eg you said I can't have taken a long enough test ride and that it was Triumph's conscious decision to make it like this. But then I read that you have decided to sell yours because you weren't happy with it. I apologise if I offended you in any way. I was just a bit confused.
 

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Tiger 1200 GT Explorer, 2022, white
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My point was that you wrote off the whole bike for a single software thing, suggesting the bike was a total faillure especially when compaired to the GS. Because of this one software issue.

I have owned both a 1250GS and a Tiger 1200 Rally Pro, tested them extensively and I came to the conclusion that the Tiger 1200 is a very good bike, in many ways better than the 1250GS. But the Rally Pro version had a couple of issues that made it not the right one for me. I think Triumph has made some serious suspension and balance errors that made the GT Explorer the better version.

The difference here is that I didn't write the whole bike off, ranting about how big the faillure was Triumph had made. And I bought a 1200 GT Explorer to prove that.
Yes, I think the Rally Pro is a bit of miss. And yes, the 900 Rally Pro seems to be better balanced than the 1200 Rally Pro. However the 1200 is a good bike, despite some flaws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My point was that you wrote off the whole bike for a single software thing, suggesting the bike was a total faillure especially when compaired to the GS. Because of this one software issue.

I have owned both a 1250GS and a Tiger 1200 Rally Pro, tested them extensively and I came to the conclusion that the Tiger 1200 is a very good bike, in many ways better than the 1250GS. But the Rally Pro version had a couple of issues that made it not the right one for me. I think Triumph has made some serious suspension and balance errors that made the GT Explorer the better version.

The difference here is that I didn't write the whole bike off, ranting about how big the faillure was Triumph had made. And I bought a 1200 GT Explorer to prove that.
Yes, I think the Rally Pro is a bit of miss. And yes, the 900 Rally Pro seems to be better balanced than the 1200 Rally Pro. However the 1200 is a good bike, despite some flaws.
Actually I didn't write off the whole bike, as in all other circumstances, I really like it. And I feel it is better balanced than the 900 GT PRO. We all have differing opinions, and that is why we choose the bike we like. However, in this particular case, it needs a Rant to get Triumphs awareness because of the safety aspect. On what planet is a bike safe, when it will come to a complete stop going up a gravel hill on a corner and there is nothing the rider can do about it. Triumph need to know that in some countries, there is nowhere to pull over when transitioning from seal to gravel roads. And, if you select Off Road mode when you set off on the day, knowing you are going to go over some gravel, the bike handles awfully in Off Road mode at highway speeds. So in all options, they have created a dangerous condition.

The comparison with the GS is valid, as Triumph created that competition, so surely they would want to know when part of their design will swing potential purchasers.
 
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