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While you "may" be right, many European car manufacturers warn strenuously against running the vehicle dry and the reason given is catalyst damage.
Well, I'm in Europe and I earn my living working on mainly European cars and American motorcycles and have done for 35 years....
Can you tell me how you can run any European vehicle or from any other place on the planet for that matter when it has no fuel?......If you can we can make millions here :)

You have fuel, you have combustion, you have no fuel you have no combustion, no combustion you are not running the engine and by default you are not using the cat.......simple really.
Every time you switch off your vehicle you have in essence run out of fuel, as the ignition system is cut and the fuel system is cut, just like it is when you run out of fuel...You cannot damage a catalytic converter by not running your engine..

The only way fuel, can damage the cat is if it is unburned fuel as I said in my previous post....

Running out of fuel CANNOT harm your catalytic converter!

Dude, think about what you're saying here....:smile2:
 

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The only way fuel, can damage the cat is if it is unburned fuel as I said in my previous post....

Running out of fuel CANNOT harm your catalytic converter!

Dude, think about what you're saying here....
Perhaps they run lean and excessively hot just before they run dry? Not an engineer but was in the trade myself for 40+ years..., so no "dude". :p Been retired for 8 years, so can't pick up the phone and call an engineer at G-DEC, Gaydon for the reasoning..., but if you work at a dealership, you could ask your PSR and HE can make the call.

They don't put that warning in the owners' manuals in BOLD CAPS for their health. ;) Liability maybe...

BTW, we've had those "grass burners" on everything for more than a decade before you were required to have them in the UK ~ 1992 IIRC.

No interest in a pissing match. Consider this :close
 

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I have been getting between 125 and 170 miles per tank on the R. Oddly enough, the harder I ride the better the mileage seems to be vs cruising around at lower RPMs
 

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No interest in a pissing match. Consider this :close
It's not a pissing match. It's clearing up some misinformation......

I don't want everyone on here panicking about low fuel levels, if it was an issue then Triumph would have put it as you say, in BIG BOLD CAPS in the handbook!

I love the way you think you get to decide whether a discussion is closed...........Must be fun in your house >:)
 

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It's not a pissing match. It's clearing up some misinformation......

I don't want everyone on here panicking about low fuel levels, if it was an issue then Triumph would have put it as you say, in BIG BOLD CAPS in the handbook!

I love the way you think you get to decide whether a discussion is closed...........Must be fun in your house >:)
Fellas, fellas... easy now. 0:)

In any case, I didn't stall even after reaching the last km on the display (once again, the 0 never appeared), so I didn't actually run dry. I didn't feel any difference, either in heat or in riding behavior. Personally, I don't believe any harm can come from running dry - but that wasn't the point of my initial post...
 

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Buldozer

That,s on the Thruxton R, not the Rocket 3........(I assume the Rocket3 is what you mean by "bulldozer")
Mi Bad:wink2: I was just about to get me a Rocket, that's ruined my day, I could just see it with a tow hitch too! I am on some good painkillers at the moment,:smile2:
 

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Usually running dry is bad because modern fuel pumps and other components need to stay wet to preserve the life of the parts. No idea if that's the case on these bikes... Also, running dry or super low means you're getting any crud that's deposited at the bottom of the tank delivered straight to the motor since it's not diluted by more fuel.

I am not an engineer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once.
 

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Usually running dry is bad because modern fuel pumps and other components need to stay wet to preserve the life of the parts. No idea if that's the case on these bikes... Also, running dry or super low means you're getting any crud that's deposited at the bottom of the tank delivered straight to the motor since it's not diluted by more fuel.

I am not an engineer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once.
Pump runs dry, engine stops......what more do you need to know! :)
 

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Usually running dry is bad because modern fuel pumps and other components need to stay wet to preserve the life of the parts. No idea if that's the case on these bikes... Also, running dry or super low means you're getting any crud that's deposited at the bottom of the tank delivered straight to the motor since it's not diluted by more fuel.

I am not an engineer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express once.
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2011/05/running-on-empty-low-gas-in-the-tank-can-be-costly/index.htm
 

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So why did you buy the bike with "fuel economy" in mind?
It was not a consideration for me.
Some here are so cheap they squeak. :D

Lots more are likely concerned with actual range, given the small, stylish tanks on the "new" bikes.
 

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Diesel fuel pumps use the diesel to lubricate the pump, petrol (gasoline) pumps do not.....Motorcycles are not run on diesel, they are run on petrol (gasoline)..
When the tank runs dry the engine stops, the engine stops, the fuel pump is automatically cut of. The ECU is programmed to cut the pump when fuel pressure drops....this is why in the event of an accident the pump ceases to pump fuel on a motorcycle....Ever heard of a tilt censor or the fall detection switch, it will detect if the motorcycle is on its side and will cut power to the ECM immediately. The same way as it detects a pressure drop in the fuel system.. This prevents the engine from running and the fuel pump from delivering fuel.......It's a safety feature built into motorcycles. Your link above is about cars (auto mobiles) not motorcycles!!

I also see you've gone from lack of fuel "damaging your catalytic converter" to lack of fuel damaging your fuel pump....!
W.T.F dude, stick with your argument rather than trying to move the goal posts to another subject..:)

You were wrong, deal with it...Stop trying to scare people on motorcycles with car S.H.I.T....

Your cat will be fine and your fuel pump is programmed to cut when a pressure drop is detected......Do not worry!....

This is a motorcycle, not a car (even though cars have a similar device, after all it's 20016 not 1995)
 

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Discussion Starter #35
So why did you buy the bike with "fuel economy" in mind?
It was not a consideration for me.

Have a look at the puny tank. "Fuel economy" might become a consideration the first time you run out of fuel.

I'm doing a 700 mile trip thru widlerness next week on the Thruxton. This should demonstrate whether or not the fuel range is going to be adequate.
If it isn't adequate, I plan to make a bigger fuel tank for the bike. Built in alloy it will knock a few pounds off and get rid of the seam.

Glen
 

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Smiles per gallon!

Some here are so cheap they squeak. :D

Lots more are likely concerned with actual range, given the small, stylish tanks on the "new" bikes.
Exactly poor or rich I squeal n squeak if I have to push my bike 10 yards, or have to leave it behind:surprise:
 

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I don't do that sort of distance on a bike these days. I do like the idea of a custom alloy tank though.
Please post a pic or 2 when you get it done. As for the seam - I agree.
I'm thinking about pinstriping to sort of distract the eye away from the seam
 
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