Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today, I came home and mixed up some oil and gas for the old motorcycle. I was keeping a promise I made yesterday to my youngest. He is 12. We pumped up the front tire and checked over the old bike. He jumped on and proceeded to utilize the kick starter and throttle for a good 15 minutes. I went in and got a beer and let him kick and kick . Some lessons are better learned the hard way and old motorcycles are nothing if not teaching machines.

So I sat there quietly in the garage drinking my beer while the boy sweated and kicked and huffed and puffed and pushed the bike halfway to Jersey and back. And then, after I finished my beer, I walked over and showed him once again how to tickle the carb. Next kick she was running, suddenly transformed into a loud fire breathing beast. A 35 year old motorcycle that is basically just some magnets spinning around copper wires, an iron barrel and a gas tank a seat and two wheels. Not much to it. And yet - as it snorted and raced around the yard, that 35 year old collection of parts created sheer joy in the heart of a 12 year old boy, and in his dad. I went out to bring him a helmet (some lessons are best NOT learned the hard way) and then watched him ride for a good while.

After a while I noticed he was riding pretty damn fast. He came in only after I called him twice for dinner, all excited with with stories of his ride, observations about the motorcycle and how good it is, his face flushed his eyes bright. I know I said, it is a good bike. A good motorcycle - what is that? Just some iron and steel, magnets and copper, but something magical also. A mixture of danger and beauty, of freedom and adventure,joy and pain, noise and smoke. Before I called him in I sat for a long moment and watched him discovering it the way we all did. Or should. Everyone should have their dad , or someone, hand them a really old motorcycle when they are young and let them try to kick start it. If it always started on the first kick, would the ride be so wonderful?

Pretty soon he will be too big to ride it and it will sleep in my garage for another 2 decades or more. Maybe someday another boy, his son, will sit on it and struggle with the mysterious 20th century carburetor. If so, I hope he lets him kick it for a while and I hope he laughs to himself and thinks of me. Technology advances, but the human heart remains the same. There is no computer, no game , no electronic device that will ever do what this simple elegant machine can do. Make magic in a persons heart that lasts a lifetime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Technology advances,but the human heart remains the same. There is no computer, no game , no electronic device that will ever do what this simple elegant machine can do. Make magic in a persons heart that lasts a lifetime


Amen to that Sal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I remember my first dirtbike, 90cc Yamaha I got when I was 9. Kicked that thing to high heaven to get it to start, but somehow my dad always got it on the first try.:mad: I actually haven't had another kickstarter since, everything else has had the magic button.

I had some nasty wrecks on that little bike, but somehow here I an still at it.:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
685 Posts
"Salvatore “Sal” Paradise is the narrator and the protagonist in Jack Kerouac's novel On the Road. Sal, an Italian American youth living in New Jersey with his aunt, is an uninspired writer working on a book who follows and accompanies Dean Moriarty, a young and reckless Denver vagrant, on his journeys across America and describes his trips with and without Dean in search of kicks."

Sal,
Me thinks you know your way around a novel and a well fashioned sentence. Good imagery, rich personification, nice blend of discovery and rediscovery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Now that was a post worthy of commenting on...

My father taught me so much, bringing back memories of my first bike, auto, boat and construction projects, as well as work and value ethics as a young man that just cant be said in words...

BTW, My father lost his sight at age 35... Never laid eyes on me...
He taught me everything with kindness, respect and a firm belief that "If you want it son, you will work for it."
I lost him at age 17, he was 60...
Pilot, builder of homes, boats and his own building material business... Played a mean piano also!

I'm 55 now, and my two sons age 25 and 22 have skills and talents that were handed down through me via their grandfather...

Parenting, guidance of our children is what it's all about...

Horsepower? Bling?

Give me family and the rest is insignificant...
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top