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Frankly, a 270 degree crank on an aircooled twin is wrong. Why not go with a 360 (or a 180)? That would give it a distinctive, proper, sound. It would vibrate more, but I can't see that a 270 degree crank gives much damping of primary or secondary imballance.

If people wanted a Harley, or a Metric cruiser, they'ed buy one.

I would say, though, that if you wanted a fairing on the Speed Triple, you probably could do with a Sprint. Speedy is supposed to be naked.

Zip
 

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Points in favor of a Triumph 500-600cc single,IMO

1. The cheapest models (Bonneville series) offered today run about $8000.00USD+. Triumph needs a model to fill out the lower end in price and performance.

2. A 500cc single would appeal to beginners as a starter bike; this would be true for those countries that have a horsepower restriction for the newly licenced (eg. the UK). If built light enough, it would have enough power to run the freeways at approx. 70mph/115kph. Fuel economy would be a good selling point, depending on gas prices.

3. If marketed skillfully, with the right styling, it could also appeal to the teenage market. I'd rather see that age group on something like this than on the current crop of overpowered (for beginners) sport bikes. A bit of a stretch on this point though; how do you make an "old timey" bike cool. If Triumph could pull it off, they could cultivate brand loyalty in the long run.

4. It could use modular construction like the Bonneville and it's variants. With a change of parts it could be set-up as a cafe' racer, street&trail, etc, Something for every taste.

5. I think that it would sell on it's retro value alone, for those that remember the Matchless singles or the BSA Victor ( the 440cc or the 500cc version of the early 70's).

6. Finally, it would be an alternative to the Royal Enfield brand with better reliability. It would surely sell in the third world where smaller bikes are daily drivers.

Who knows if Triumph could sell enough to really make a profit. For my two cents, it's worth looking into.-------James.
 

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I'm gonna make some broad generalizations here based on my observations...

The American motorcycle market is fickle and obsessed with image. I think that's why most go for Japanese sportbikes or American cruisers. Because they are cool, loud, and dangerous. Many riders, especially young guys, want to be a badass. For this demographic, classic styled bikes and small bore thumpers don't cut it. These bikes just don't have that mass appeal. Remember, in our culture there are accepted norms in fashion, design, music, entertainment, etc. Most people will not stray outside of these boundaries for fear of being mocked or not being accepted by everyone else. It takes much more effort to make your own rules and decide for yourself what is cool than to just go along with everyone else.

For some, a motorcycle is simply a fashion accessory, a toy. Something you ride down to the bar on Thursday nights. Another THING to tell the world how cool you are.

The point of all this... :angrysoapbox:

Motorcycle manufacturers are trying to make money in a tough market. Triumph is attempting to break out a bit from a niche market and make something with more mass appeal. I'm glad they are keeping the modern classics line alive. I can't think of another manufacturer that has such incredible diversity in their model range. Come on, you can get a retro roadster, cafe racer, dual sport, sport tourer, sportbike, streetfighter, cruiser, or a chopper. This brand has something for everyone! What are we complaining about?
 

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Co-sign that ARC. Only one thing is missing from the line IMHO.

As a certified Trophreak, I'd like to see a new Trophy. I don't see it as a sport touring bike; that's the Sprint ST. The Trophy is really a touring bike with strong sport heritage. It runs rings around the others (beems, wings, and other things).

Love to see what the lads could come up with.
 

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Or maybe like this: http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/oo203/thruxton-texas/1956GreenDOT197ccroundframemodel.jpg
This one is a file photo of a DOT 197cc, Circa 1956, this looks close to my first bike. The Earle's forks would be a nice touch on a modern bike; they don't dive under heavy braking like telescopic forks do. The only question is, would they sell in today's market. I'd buy one, but I'm a bit eccentric.:D----James.
I used to have one of these, it was built like the Forth Bridge. I T-boned a Ford once with it - usual "I didn't see you...." Just about cut the nose off the car when I hit it behind the front wheel, picked myself up and rode off leaving the cage undrivable.
 

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Most people will not stray outside of these boundaries for fear of being mocked or not being accepted by everyone else.
It's a good day when you realize you shouldn't give a darn. It's a great day when you realize that you actually don't.

It's amazing how many people never reach that point.
 

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I'm gonna make some broad generalizations here based on my observations...

The American motorcycle market is fickle and obsessed with image. I think that's why most go for Japanese sportbikes or American cruisers. Because they are cool, loud, and dangerous. Many riders, especially young guys, want to be a badass. For this demographic, classic styled bikes and small bore thumpers don't cut it. These bikes just don't have that mass appeal. Remember, in our culture there are accepted norms in fashion, design, music, entertainment, etc. Most people will not stray outside of these boundaries for fear of being mocked or not being accepted by everyone else. It takes much more effort to make your own rules and decide for yourself what is cool than to just go along with everyone else.

For some, a motorcycle is simply a fashion accessory, a toy. Something you ride down to the bar on Thursday nights. Another THING to tell the world how cool you are.

The point of all this... :angry soapbox:

Motorcycle manufacturers are trying to make money in a tough market. Triumph is attempting to break out a bit from a niche market and make something with more mass appeal. I'm glad they are keeping the modern classics line alive. I can't think of another manufacturer that has such incredible diversity in their model range. Come on, you can get a retro roadster, cafe racer, dual sport, sport tourer, sport bike, street fighter, cruiser, or a chopper. This brand has something for everyone! What are we complaining about?

My Thruxton is "cool, loud, and dangerous"; the latter two are under tight control of my right wrist, the first I can't do anything about.:big laugh:

Your 'broad generalizations" are valid, and unfortunately hit the nail square on the head; it's all about image. When I got my bike three years ago, I took a lot of BS from my buddies; I got comments such as: "How can you stand to ride that crotch rocket, all bent over like that. Those things are for young guys." Or, "Why didn't you buy a Harley cruiser; why did you settle for such a small bike." You get the picture. ( I remember a time when anything over 500cc was a big bike) My reply was: "I make my choices to suit ME, because it D*** well pleases me."

As I said, point #3 is a stretch, most folks (especially teenagers) need Madison Ave. to tell them what they want. It starts with the Saturday morning cartoons and toy ads. None of us are totally immune; it's all a head game anyway. But if the advertisers can sell boatloads of Harleys (overpriced and overweight) on image alone or Camel cancer sticks (used to be considered an "old man's brand") to the under 25 crowd (thank you Joe Camel :mad:), couldn't they sell a different style of bike? It's probably an uphill battle and not profitable to do so; I just stated IMO that it was worth looking into.

Oddly enough, more than half of the folks that take an interest in my bike are youngsters; not the old timers who "use to own/ride one back in the day".

If Triumph made a big "thumper", I'd be first in line to buy one. But as you point out, they are in business to make money; and I don;t think they'd build one just for me.:D No complaints here; I'm just playing the "sidewalk superintendant".:D------James.
 

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An entry level would be nice. However one of the problems with entry level bikes is that they are always a short term solution for they're owners. Think Buell Blast, or 250 Ninja. Once someone is comfortable on them they tend to move on quickly. The Entry level target needs to be a bit higher. It needs to be easy to ride and and inexpensive, but not disposable. I'm thinking something in the nature of Ninja 500R. It does the entry level thing with enough power to stay in the running once your a confident rider. A Triumph twin 500 to 600cc with decent power. With a target price starting under $6000.
 

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"Why didn't you buy a Harley cruiser;
When I was in the process of deciding on my first Triumph (I had just sold a YZF600R, and was considering Sprints and Daytonas, to give you an idea of my intentions) a friend of mine asked, over and over again, if I was getting a Harley. I liked him, so I kept my real opinions to myself (mostly), but Mohatma tap-dancing Ghandi, let it drop already! "Oh, you're buying a horse? I had a trail ride once. You should get a Clydesdale. Have you considered a Clydesdale? Bought your horse yet? Looking at Clydesdales?" :Angry_98OLVV:

Ride what you love. The sidewalk jockeys can get stuffed.
 

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When I was in the process of deciding on my first Triumph (I had just sold a YZF600R, and was considering Sprints and Daytonas, to give you an idea of my intentions) a friend of mine asked, over and over again, if I was getting a Harley. I liked him, so I kept my real opinions to myself (mostly), but Mohatma tap-dancing Ghandi, let it drop already! "Oh, you're buying a horse? I had a trail ride once. You should get a Clydesdale. Have you considered a Clydesdale? Bought your horse yet? Looking at Clydesdales?" :Angry_98OLVV:

Ride what you love. The sidewalk jockeys can get stuffed.
+1 Hi, I failed to mention that the ones with the comments rode Harleys or Metricrusers. I've got no problem with Clydesdales; if all you wanna do drive a beer wagon. It's just the thing for comfort; and you can listen to music. My machine came with a built-in sound system; it always plays the same clasic tune that I somehow never tire of.:D Now if Triumph would just build a mechanical version of a mule.:D------James.
 

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I think Triumph does much better than HD in developing new, quality bikes.

HD seems to thrive on antiquity and nostalgia. I really don't care about that. I want a good bike that performs well and fits my personality.

I loved the new Tiger when it came out and the 675 Daytona brought a lot of customers into Triumph showrooms. I also thought the Thruxton and Scrambler were excellent adaptations of the Bonnie.

I think Triumph has done fairly well, considering. The one thing I would say is that we need another liter Sportbike..
 
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