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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The one on the left hand side. It's weeping oil, and my oil consumption has risen. I have tried searching through the parts fiches on Bikebandit, but to no avail. I know this breather goes to the airbox, but whats inside the cover, and I have been draining the airbox, which doesnt seem to give out any more oil than when new. I have searched my haynes manual and I havent found jack about it.
 

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Engine Breather

Hi Woodsie

there are two main parts that ensure that the breather operates correctly. One is a centrifical oil thrower and the other is a very special oil seal.

The thrower is bolted to the crankshaft (left side) it consists of a round plastic disc with several drillings from the outside diameter to the inside. A further drilling goes through the centre of the disc. This drilling ends in a shaft that sits in the oil seal. How it works is that centrifical force, when the motor is running, throws the engine oil out through the disc drillings but allows any crankcase gases to escape due to the pressure created in the engine via the centre drilling.
The seal, very expensive, ($NZ75.00) sits in the engine cover. This seal sits over the shaft extending from the centre of the disc and is designed to allow only gases to escape the crankcase, not oil.
I have replaced both parts on my machine. The latest disc has a longer shaft for the seal to bear on. The seal comes with a plastic mandrel fitted. This is to keep the internal shape of the seal 'stretched'. The mandrel is left in place when the seal is fitted into the engine cover. Just prior to fitting the cover remove the mandrel and carefully line up and fit the cover.
The rational for all this is that the seal actually shrinks itself around the disc shaft over a period of time (15 minutes prior to starting engine) although the longer the better.
Even after completing this task I still had excess oil heading into the airbox.
As an aside have the head off at the moment trying to track down why the blowby from the engine contains moisture (turns too a white gooey mess). My thoughts were that one or more of the liners had unsealed. Now my engine reconditioner Mate tells me that due too the high aluminium content used in the manufacture of the engine it is possible for some of the castings to be or become porous overtime !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Before I ask my question, let me first communicate that I know very little about oil control in motorcycle engines. Being new to motorcycles and my Legend, I can only assume that I am also weeping oil.

Can something like an oil catch can used in cagers (just learned that term yesterday! :eek: LOL :D ) be fitted to the bike? Or is there essentially no room and nowhere to put it?

I really need a Haynes Manual methinks.
 

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I saw a guy use a Red Bull can as an oil catcher attached to the breather hose!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply. I shall order the parts promptly. If that doesn't fix the problem them its rebuild time. This bike has served me well, it deserves some good lovin'
 

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Breather Route Modification.

Before I ask my question, let me first communicate that I know very little about oil control in motorcycle engines. Being new to motorcycles and my Legend, I can only assume that I am also weeping oil.

Can something like an oil catch can used in cagers (just learned that term yesterday! :eek: LOL :D ) be fitted to the bike? Or is there essentially no room and nowhere to put it?

I really need a Haynes Manual methinks.
What I did to contain excess oil and moisture from the blowby hose was the following:

Remove the secondary airbox and drill a hole (at the front side) the same size as the breather hose.
Remove the top of the airbox, find a small plastic container with a screw cap that fits neatly into the bottom of the airbox, drill a hole in the base of the container to take the hose.
Unscrew the cap of the container and fill with foam rubber, then drill a hole in the cap 180 degrees above the hole in the base. Screw cap back on.
Secure container in bottom of airbox with plastic ties, holes already there.

What this modification does is catch any oil or moisture in the foam, this prevents contaminating the air filter in the main airbox and still allows waste gases to be burnt.
In my case, it is an easy matter to remove the container each 5000 miles and clean the foam.
 

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Ahhh, very cool. A kind of mini-me internal "catch-can"!

Much appreciated. :)
 
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