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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am sure that I am not the only one following the threads on the watercooled 900 cam that has not contemplated purchasing one and installing it on their own.
I am also sure that some of you are like me in that you do not have the necessary credentials to perform such a task without a bit of folly and gun ho attitude.
This is just a small post based on the knowledge obtained from George's excellent video and the Haynes manual.
I read the relevant chapters in the Haynes manual many times to get an initial picture of what the process is all about and like any manual the more I read the more it made sense and hence the more comfortable I felt.
This applied to the video tutorial too.
Last Friday we had some unusual dry and warm weather with no snow on the road and I decided to take my last ride on my bike.When I arrived I thought to myself that this would be a good time to drain the oil out of the bike as it is warm and so therefore force myself in doing the project.
I placed my pc in my workshop with George's video tutorial loaded and set to work.
I placed my bike on its center stand and drained the oil.
The tank came off just fine and all the bits and pieces attached to the frame, The injector leads were too tight and I could not hang everything over the right hand side of the frame.I then discovered that the wiring of the injector leads is held in place by a plastic hook on the controller unit as shown in the picture "Injector Lead"below.Once i released the wire cable from this I had all the slack needed.

https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629364&thumb=1

Below is a picture of the hook where the lead was attached.


https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629366&thumb=1

The rest of the process of opening up the valve cover was straightforward.

The next job was to open the alternator cover and I used a rubber mallet to release the casing and had allot of resistance from the upper right hand corner of the cover. I managed to release the whole joint except this corner.I then placed a large flat head screwdriver wrapped in a cotton rag in the small recess of the cover in this area and progressively applied more pressure until it released.
I was also lucky in that the wiring grommet did not break away when I pulled the cover away.This will make installation easier.I did however use zip ties to hold the cover in a position that protects the wiring grommet from tension whilst doing the rest of the install.

https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629368&thumb=1

https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629370&thumb=1

I then followed George's video instructions and rotated the motor clockwise until I felt less pressure on the EX1 and IN 1 rockers.
The Haynes manual here says to place the locking pin and camshaft blocking tool. I did not as the video shows to the contrary.
I removed the EX1 and In 1 Rocker covers and also the cam carrier.

I then rotated the motor again untill I had slack on the opposite side before removing the EX2 and IN 2 Rocker covers.
Before removing the EX2 and IN 2 cam carrier I rotated the motor until I was in the timing position as shown in the video and inserted the locking tool.
Only after having inserted the locking tool did I remove the EX2 and IN 2 cam carrier.
I used the shaft of a wood drill bit which is 6.45mm thick as the tool.

https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629372&thumb=1

The next job was to remove the timing chain tensioner which was also straightforward.

I was apprehensive on taking the chain off the sprocket of the camshaft as I thought that it would be fiddly and tight, It was not and came away quite easily. I did try and put it back on again just out of curiosity and it was easier than it seemed in the video.
Now I am at the stage where my original camshaft has been removed and the locking pin is in in the timing position.
I am waiting for my machine shop to finish my locking tool for the camshaft before I carry on.
Below is a picture of my current situation where the locking tool is inserted and my old camshaft has been removed.

https://www.triumphrat.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=629374&thumb=1
 

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For some reason I get a "Invalid Attachment specified. If you followed a valid link, please notify the administrator" message when trying to view most of the attachments. Some are OK.

Marvelous so far!
 

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Thanks for the story and photos so far. My cam arrived (within 24 hours - brilliant service) last week and the gasket etc a couple of days later. I don’t imagine I will get round to fitting it this side of Christmas, but I’m not in any great hurry as the weather here is rubbish at the moment.

Looking forward to seeing what you come up with for locking the cam.:smile2:

Just a couple of small points - the engine will turn over much easier with the spark plugs removed and I would rather see something ‘softer’ used to support the cam chain. A plastic (or even wooden) rod would be much less likely to damage the cam bearings than a spanner. Yes! I know George uses a spanner in his video, but I certainly wouldn’t.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just lightly place the spark plugs in when not doing any work to stop dust and dirt getting in.
I also place a cover over the whole bike between jobs.
Thanks for the advice regarding the spanner, I will use something else.
 

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The cam bearing surface is not that soft otherwise the engine would be rooted very quickly if laying a spanner there is going to damage anything.
 

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Awesome work Singlin.. I am looking forward to your assessment of the improvement once the job is complete..More Power To You!!!

Also respect for the way in which you are laying out the job for all to see. Hat tip :welldone
 

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Woo Hoo I love the DIY attitude!
Excellent write up.
My bike is in the garage waiting for my last night shift to end so I can button it up tomorrow with the TEC cam installed.
I also bought a booster plug and the Vance and Hines bling slipons, meerkat crossover and a shim kit to re shim the valves if needed.
All fun and games.
Cheers.




Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

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Woo Hoo I love the DIY attitude!
Excellent write up.
My bike is in the garage waiting for my last night shift to end so I can button it up tomorrow with the TEC cam installed.
I also bought a booster plug and the Vance and Hines bling slipons, meerkat crossover and a shim kit to re shim the valves if needed.
All fun and games.
Cheers.




Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
Looks at Nige and mutters... bbbbbut ya forgot the kitchen sink bro. Chuckles and waits to hear of yet another Tec success
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Camshaft blocking tool finished.
I payed 7 euros for it ro be made as per the Haynes manual dimensions.


Inviato dal mio SM-G935F utilizzando Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Question for those of you who have fitted the cam.
Did you apply grease or lubricant to your alternator gasket when refitting?
 

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Excellent thread. The only I’d add, and I mentioned this elsewhere, is that I inadvertently knocked one of my shims loose while wrestling with new cam. I couldn’t see it anywhere and it wasn’t being picked up by my magnet stick. I was facing the prospect of removing the cam and hoping the magnet would pick it up down the chain cavity or maybe having to tear down the whole motor. After 10 or so agonising minutes my mate spotted it in a puddle of oil lurking in a spot too tight for the magnet to reach but nevertheless on top of the head. Huge relief.

Anyway, I’d recommend removing all the shims and noting which one was where BEFORE attemoting to put the new cam in. Probably an unnecessary precaution if you know to be careful but trust me, you don’t want to go through those ten minutes I did. I also comment elsewhere it also being helpful to know which shim is where before you start checking clearances. This avoids a little bit of the trial and error and removing tappets to see what’s under there. As it happened I was able to swap a couple around and thus avoided the need to replace any.

The first start after the job is a nervous one. Mine fired straight up and idled perfectly with no leaks. Got to be happy with that. Ride reviews will be in the other thread.
 

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New cam in place and then I noticed the missing shim.

E7DC0166-8676-4DEE-9503-4C33DF1FB72E.jpg

My locking tool. $2 from the hardware store. Was going to get a wider one and grind down the shoulders but none were close enough to the right thickness. This worked fine although the job can be done without one, IMO.

A0878310-AB10-421B-A805-351EFBA31529.jpg
 

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Nice write up CanberraR3, I didn't use a cam locking tool and only a crank locking pin to torque the cam sprocket bolts.
The slot in the cam is very close to the head surface and so it's easy to see even a very small error of alignment.
Cheers.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 
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