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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a 2000 TBS back in May and so far this site has helped me through a fair bit just by reading others posts, but the time has finally come for me to ask a question.
My left fork is starting to leak and I have zero experience rebuilding forks, my hope is that between this site and my Haynes manual I'll be able to do the job myself.

So my questions are;
1) How difficult is this job for someone doing it for the first time? i have done some work on bikes in the past, brakes, ignition, chain, sprockets, etc but never forks.
2) Are there any special tools required for the job? Id hate to get half way and realize I need something I don't have.
3) Below is the list of parts I plan on getting before starting the job. Is there anything else I should have on hand? Knowing the scarce availability of some parts and their lead time when ordering, I'd like to be ready to go.

Sealing washer 2040074-T0301
Slider Bush T2045085
Washer 2040077-T0301
Oil seal 2040078-T0301
Ring snap 2040079-T0301
Dust seal 2040080-T0301

Any other advise is always appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
One more question! Is it best to go with oem parts or has anyone had success with aftermarket parts? I see some aftermarket folks sell full rebuild kits but im not interested if the quality isn't there.

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Fork Seals

Vesrah AR-4301 (43 x 53 x 11mm) are very good seals. These should be all you need to prevent a leak. The job is time consuming but if you are methodical, not hard. I would carefully examine the bushes prior to ordering/replacing as they wear very slowly and unless your machine has a very high milage, I doubt that bush replacement will be necessary. When you have the stanchions out lightly run very fine wet & dry sand paper up and down the diameter of the stanchion that goes thru the seals to remove any small nicks and protrutions. Try and obtain a pair of aftermarket stanchion protectors to clip around the top of of the sliders.
Ps-a workshop manual will help you out enormously.
 

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The bushings are made up sort of like a crankshaft bearing: steel under copper under the top coat, which appears to be some sort of teflon-like material, instead of babbit as in a bearing. Anyhow, if they're worn through to the copper you should consider replacing them.
 

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Did fork seals for the first time this spring after buying my 98 tbird and having both leak immediately. Really not too bad of a job although it was intimidating to undertake. After lots of research on this site and watching this video i finally built up the courage to do it and things went pretty smoothly.

Couple of tips:
-As you've already probably read be careful removing the top cover on the forks. It's under pressure and will go flying across the garage when it comes loose. Maybe put a rag or towel over top when you're loosening. After you do it once you'll know what to expect and can just keep applying pressure to the wrench as you loosen it
-I did the complete rebuild on one fork and mounted it back to the bike before undertaking the second. That way i didn't have to worry about keeping parts separate and could look to see how the second was mounted when putting the 1st back on
-Just take your time and double check everything as you go. It's really not that bad and will make a lot more sense once you get it torn apart.

For replacement seals i used All Balls Racing. It comes with two different sizes since Triumph changed the forks on these things at some point. I've got about 2500 miles on them this spring/summer and so far all is good.
 

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Thunderbird Sport forks are different from either of the forks used on the straight Thunderbird (and all the other classics). I'm not sure if any of the seals and internals are interchangeable or not.

Thanks WSC - got caught up in talking about my experience and forgot we were looking at a TBS here.

Ontrider - Disregard my parts link but do take a look at that video as I thought it was quite helpful.

Good luck!


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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone this sure gives me a lot more confidence moving forward. Tiedman--that was an excellent video, thanks for sharing.
One more thing, the schematics on bikebandit only list one bushing? Is the bottom bushing replaceable or worth replacing? Does anyone have a part number on a link to a replacement?
 

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Apparently it is not available. I haven't had my TBS forks apart so I don't know what type of bushing is in there. I am currently restoring a pair of the Showa forks, for which the lower bush is also not available, and I have "made" replacements from a pair of generic KYB bushings I cut down to size.
 

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Apparently it is not available. I haven't had my TBS forks apart so I don't know what type of bushing is in there. I am currently restoring a pair of the Showa forks, for which the lower bush is also not available, and I have "made" replacements from a pair of generic KYB bushings I cut down to size.
Sprint Manufacturing (UK) supply both the fork seals and the fork bushes for Showa and kayaba forks (bottom of page)

http://www.triumphparts.gbr.cc/index.php/14/432780/
 
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