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Hi,
I have a 1998 Daytona T595 with a gas leak at the small breather and overflow ports on the bottom of the gas tank. These little barb fittings have small flat rubber washers that cracked. After taking the fuel pump housing off to inspect I found the tubes for these barb fittings inside the gas tank look like they were sprayed completly with the same material as the gas tanks are made of. I dont understand how these barb fittings can leak gas. Anyone seen this before?
Thanks, Steve
 

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I had same problem - it took me forever to figure out how I was getting leak through those. What I eventually found was that there was a leak through the tube itself! When the tank was over half-full, it would drip continuously, but once in bottom half, would be fine.

What I did was remove the tank, drain it, remove pump assembly, then 'paint' gas-resistant epoxy over the tubes.
I let it cure & built up several coats. There was no visible crack or split, presumably a pin-hole so I just coated both tubes over most of their length.

The only other option is replace tank - there is no other way to repair/replace these tubes.
 

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Yes, I know I am resurrecting an old post, but I had to say something because it is rare that I actually find what I'm looking for with the search option. :D

My posts here are few, and this may be my first meaningful one ;), so let me say THANKS to DEcosse for, once again, posting the fix to a problem I have encountered. My '98 T595 has developed the same fuel leak scenario described by Steven S and DEcosse. The overflow or vent tube inside the tank leaks fuel when the tank is more than 2/3rds full.

As you can see in the photos, there is no visible defect inside. However, as Steven S mentioned it is tough to discern where the problem may be when the tubes are coated in deposits of plastic from when it was manufactured.






DEcosse, I'm very interested to learn more about the "gas-resistant epoxy" you used to coat the tubes inside the tank. Also, has the fix stood up to the test of time - now going on four years? I hope so.

Fortunately, my fuel tank is otherwise in pretty good shape. While it has deformed slightly from the "ethanol fuel" issue, it merely enlarged slightly, making it difficult to fit in place on the frame. There are no blisters or bumps ..... yet. I suppose the dry climate, here in the desert, helps in that regard.

I've been distracted with other projects, but it is time that I give the Daytona some attention, so I look forward to visiting more often and learning along the way - and hopefully helping some others in the process.
 

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Leak never re-appeared.

What you might consider is lining the entire tank with Caswell Plating Epoxy tank liner kit - I just painted tank* and lined it before I did that.
It will not only cure your leak but also seal the PA6 tank from further issue from ethanol.
The other known 'weak' area where the side panel fasteners are, can also benefit from 'puddling' some epoxy in there to give it additional strength
(I never had issue with this personally but there are quite a few who have)

(I actually painted a different tank - the original paint looked really good still so wanted to leave original)

This is the sealer

 

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Update:
Last week I gave my fuel tank the Caswell Epoxy treatment. This weekend I was able to test it, and all seems well. It is early still, but I filled the tank and there are no signs of the leak from the overflow/vent tubes. :D

From what I can see with the camera, everything was thoroughly coated with epoxy. In order to ensure that the overflow and vent tubes were well covered, I used a latex gloved hand and paper towels taped around my forearm to 'play' with the epoxy. This allowed me to scoop up a puddle and work it around the tubes multiple times. Otherwise, I couldn't be sure that the tubes would be coated thoroughly.

A few photos for your viewing pleasure....













Thanks for your help. Now I can ride it. :ride
 

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Great pics!!!




You can see I used the red (for a bit of whimsy - of course you can't see it when it's all button up except at gas stops
) but actually the red works well to differentiate where it is coating

I think in your case I would have perhaps mixed very small amount first and 'painted' it on the tubes as a pre-step and allowed it to cure before doing main tank the next day.
But your coverage looks really good. Nice job!!!
 

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Jason here, just gonna revive this thread....

My T595 recently began doing the same thing... Which annoys me because I just drained the fuel from the rain water incident (overflow tube was clogged).
My leaking vent tube issue is exacerbated by the fact the fitting and tube for the vent is flat out gone; causing the fuel to belch right out onto the frame and shift linkage, giving both of them a yellow tinge. Sure hope this crap comes off...

Anyhow, I had a thought.
Why not just jam an m8 bolt where the fitting would be to just plug up the leaking vent tube?
"But then the tank will collapse from being unable to vent!" (I understand the fuel cap doesn't vent)
True. But clearly there is an area around the lid where water can enter the tank(learned from the rain water in the fuel incident) surely air can get in too to release the vacuum in the tank... Right?

Am I crazy???


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lol I know that Ken! I'm not completely green ;)

I wasn't asking if the overflow would vent the tank; but more or less "how did rain water enter the tank?"

Because if the lid isn't sealing 100%, I can effectively plug the vent fitting with a bolt without having to worry about the tank collapsing.
Not as a permanent fix, but just until I can find the time to epoxy the tank



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It probably leaked water into the tank via the drain tube inside the tank. That's my guess. Doesn't have to come from an improperly sealed cap. You may have more than just a vent tube failure. Or, try your theory and see what happens. The worse, the engine stalls from vapor lock. I really can't see the tank collapsing.
 

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Ah but if both the vent AND the overflow inner tank tubes have failed; the overflow tube becomes the vent tube!
Hahaha this is madness really :p

I don't plan on riding or even running the engine until I have the epoxy on hand. So in the mean time I did indeed just plug the vent tube with an m8 bolt and a spare fuel line connector o-ring (anyone who works on these bikes should keep a few hundred extras haha!)
At least now the tank isn't leaking while I have it parked...


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no need for apologies, i try to not take things personally as often as i used to (anger management course technique) :D

well, against my better judgement, i rode it to work this morning. not a far commute, maybe 15-20mi on highways with some sprinkling of traffic. (weather isnt the best here on the east coast today..)

and apart from the bike getting hot at the final couple street lights at the end (worst was a couple needle-widths from "red") the bike stalled once at an abrupt stop from 60mph to 0. and since i used the improper technique (MSF technique is to down shift while stopping so you're in first when you stop completely) i was still in 5th when it stalled. and of course, traffic immediately began moving again so i was frantically shifting and re-starting the bike.
the idle speed seems pitiful after coming down from high revs at-speed... just below 1k but these are other problems for other threads :D

no known side-affects from vent hose being plugged as of now. i "vent" the tank through the lid before starting and stopping trips, and i havent noticed any negative vacuum yet... i prolly have bigger problems haha
 

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Excellent write up everyone. I'm not surprised we all need some sort of epoxy coating to fix leaks with this sort of tank. I had to use special rust coating paint on a metal tank in the past. Neither material seems free from issues.
 

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Hey guys, back again. Ive pulled my tank and i got some caswell. My next question is about the fuel level sensor. How did you guys handle that? Did you cling film it and then just cut the seal a bit, or did you remove it?
 

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Is there any chance it's the rubber deals that are bad?
No. The Rubber seals don't even really see any gas UNLESS there is a leak - the only way you get gas at the rubber seal is if the tube is full of gas

My next question is about the fuel level sensor. How did you guys handle that?
I put a rubber bung in it
 
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