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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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Mmm I was hoping to avoid splitting the cases but maybe that was wishful thinking as I don’t have any history on the bike.
This was my sludge trap....
Engine was clean, crank on standard bearings and bores +40 thou. Can't be entirely sure of the mileage, but it is not excessive. The bike has sat in a shed for thirty years.
Whilst in there you could also check that you have the later type timing side main bearing.
Automotive tire Rim Automotive design Wheel Tints and shades
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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That’s pretty full of crud. I’ll have to give it the full strip. Did the crank need regrinding and would new Conrad’s be needed. I’ll replace the bearings while I’m there.
Bearings were measured as spot on. No bent conrods.
I am taking the opportunity to change bearings in engine and gearbox. Also had bores honed and am fitting new rings.
There's a lot of info on here about main bearing types and clearances. Well worth researching this before rebuilding.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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I’ve continued the strip down today but have come to a stop as can’t get the clutch basket out or the pinion gear off so will have to get the tools. My opinion on the engine is it has been well maintained during its life. All fasteners are in good condition and everything has undone without drama. It will all come down to how worn things are I suppose.
If you don't have the special tool you don't need to remove the pinion before splitting the crank cases. It will follow the crank shaft through the crank case. Once removed you can remove it with a more traditional puller. Be careful of the crank shaft end on that side- it must never be bashed!! If it gets deformed, oil supply to the crank will leak past the lip seal, which this shaft rotates against.
You definitely need the tool for the clutch basket. You will also need a small hub puller to get the primary drive sprocket and cam shaft gears off.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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Don’t think the frame had been blasted. It looked pretty original, I have repainted it now but used a wire wheel to strip the paint as I didn’t want to blast it for obvious reasons. I’m going to fit an external cartridge filter. I’ll have a look at the oil pump but may stump up for a new one as it looks like the original so presume it will be worn. Don’t know what’s gone on with the pistons but doesn’t really matter as it’s going to get new ones and barrels.
The external oil filter will filter the return oil. So if you've got muck in the frame it will have to pass through the engine before being filtered.
An in frame filter will filter the supply oil. So, in your case, unless you are absolutely sure that the frame is clean, this may be a better option.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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Got the clutch puller today. So carried on splitting the cases. I’ve got the clutch side off but can’t get the crank out of the timing side. I haven’t removed the pinion gear could this be the problem.
Did this last week on mine. The pinion wheel will pass through with the crank. You probably need to put some heat on the crank case so that the main bearing drops out of its housing. Don’t go over 150 degrees with the heat.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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Had a time getting the crank out but heating it up did the trick. Unfortunately my puller is too big to get the bearing and pinion off so I’ll have to order a smaller one. The sludge trap doesn’t look like it’s ever been touched. The sludge trap plug isn’t left hand thread is it.
RH thread. You'll probably need an impact screwdriver to undo it. I've heard that sometimes they are thread locked in. So heat it up beyond 100 deg before trying to remove it, otherwise you might muller the screw head. This should melt any glue.
 

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I had a quick wiggle of the conrods and there seems quite a lot of movement side to side which didn’t look good.
You can measure the end float clearance with feeler gauges. There is a spec for this in the workshop manual. You will feel some wobble if you do as you said.
You can measure the crank pin diameter with 1-2" micrometer (not Vernier calipers), and if to spec use Plastigage to measure the bearing shell to crank pin clearance (spec also in workshop manual). Do the latter even if your fitting new bearing shells.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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Warning explicit sludge trap pictures. Well it didn’t look like the sludge trap had been touched previously. But looks clean to me. Very confusing this engine at least it looks like the crank is good View attachment 774486
Undo the retaining bolt, pull the tube out and have a good look inside.
Looks pretty clean from the photo.
 

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Triumph Bonneville T140v, 1977
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There is some damage to the timing case and a bit of scouring on the bearing face. But I think it will clean up ok and shouldn’t be a problem. What are the main bearing part numbers I believe one is upgraded. View attachment 774497
Is your timing side bearing a roller or ball bearing type? The change is on the timing side. Used to be a ball but now its a roller bearing. Supposedly stops the damage your referring too. Be careful with bearing clearance choice. I took advice from Mick Barrett and TR7RV Man on this. Found a C3 on the TS and C2 on the DS was best. TS changed to a roller bearing.
 

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I went for this on the TS...
.
Its not a plastic cage, but a composite cage. It seems to be the way all bearing producers are going for the smaller size bearings.
I am picking up the crank cases this week, so hopefully should soon start reassembly...
 

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I’ve been looking at the NKE bearings seem well priced without being cheap. Where you happy with the look of them then.
I checked out the bearing company, they have a good reputation.
Also, my local classic Triumph repair specialist uses this bearing and has never had an issue.
 
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