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Discussion Starter #81
I have still not started building the rear wheel, but I have been getting on with more preparation of related parts for the running gear. I knew that the brakes needed looking at, so I though it would be good to get on with that.

The biggest problem with the front wheel was undoing the nut that holds the brake plate on to the spindle. I discovered it is a 1 1/8 inch AF. Not a size I had to hand, I was due to go to an autojumble (swap meet) at the weekend so I thought I would put it on my shopping list of things to look for. The nut sits in a little recess with the spindle through the middle so I expected I might have to modify whatever I could find. I ended up buying 2 sockets, thinking I might have to cut one so that I could use it without the spindle getting in the way. Then I spotted a combination spanner for a princely £2, the sockets having only cost £1.50 each.

In the event I had to grind a little off the ring part of the spanner to get it to fit, but once started the nut came of easily. Looking inside the front brake there was corrosion, but in the main it did look mostly usable. The front wheel was not original to the bike and it has a new rim and stainless spokes so it was probably to be expected that the brake internals would be alright.

I stripped it down and gave everything a good clean, with a mixture of glass blast, soda blast, Scotchbrite mop, and Autosol. I then put it back together using brake lube in appropriate places. I also blasted and powder coated the actuating arms. I used silver for the first time, which came out a little disappointing. More of a light grey than I expected.

I did think about getting new brake shoes, but the existing ones look to have plenty of meat left on them so I will have to see how they work once I get the rest of the bike together. I am going for a working rather than show finish so overall I am pretty please with the outcome.
 

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Discussion Starter #83 (Edited)
Since your wheel is apart you may consider these extended front brake levers for improved performance.
Look like a great idea. I will keep my eye open for them, but only on my wish list for now! I am becoming more aware of how much I am spending on this build, but "nobody said it was going to be cheap"!! I can see how it would be easy to spend 2 or 3 times what the bike will eventually be worth. I was going to use mostly stainless nuts and bolts, but although individually the parts look cheap, it's amazing how quickly the cost spirals upwards, when adding them to an order!! :(
 

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I just worked my way through the entire thread and the progress is really fun to watch. Fantastic pictures and any overall great project! I can't wait to see what else is in store.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
I didn't expect the back brake to be in as good condition as the front, mainly because it was original to the bike and would have been sat outside for a long time.

There was certainly a lot of corrosion on the outside. However once I got the brake apart it didn't seem to be in any worse condition than the front. I stripped and cleaned everything like I had for the front, there was much more corrosion on the brake plate than the front, but after soda blasting, and the good old 3M Scotchbrite mops, it looked every bit as good.

It's amazing how quickly the mops clean off rust and corrosion without causing damage to the part. I'm mostly using fine and very fine mops and they do seem to last well, I am just at the point of ordering 2 more.

Next will be the front fork stantions.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
When I originally took the front forks apart the stanchions where very corroded and took a lot of effort to dismantle. I had to angle grind the end of one of the fork tubes to get the end plug to move. It was the one that looked like it may have been exposed to a fire, so that may have had something to do with it.

Having it got it all apart I made a list of the parts I needed and spent some time gathering them, which was virtually everything. However the sliders were recoverable, and refurbing them was in a previous post. Although the outsides are a little battle scarred the insides cleaned up fine. I also managed to clean the damper tubes and springs. The damper tubes do have some pitting, but as the should live in oil I think they will be fine. There was there was another issue with one of the damper tubes but more of that later.

The manual lists ATF fluid as the fork oil, but having read a few threads on here, i decided that I would us 7.5 weight oil, so I got some ordered, and got all of the parts together, then having checked that I had everything put the forks together.

I found it difficult to get the screw in the bottom of one of the sliders, but with a little fiddling got it to start. I should have been more suspicious. Both forks seemed to work reasonably acceptably, when compressed separately, it was only when I stood them side by side that there was an obvious problem. One was around two inches shorter than the other :(

I had run out of time that day so I had to leave investigating the problem. In the meantime my imagination ran riot, with all types of unlikely reasons coming to mind, wrong sized components, striction of the seals, even thought that it might even have freed up while I wasn't looking (it didn't).

A couple of days later, I got around to stripping the offending fork leg. At first I couldn't see anything that would cause the issue, and I started to think that perhaps the new end plug I was using didn't have the bush central, so was making the damper tube run a little diagonally causing it to bind. Then I realised it was actually the damper tube which had a bend in it, causing it to bind without allowing the forks to fully extend.

At first I couldn't work out why it was bent, and started wondering if it had been damaged in some previous front end accident, but as the tubes where straight it didn't seem likely, then it struck me. When I was originally struggling to get the end plug out I had used quite a bit of force, and I must have bent it then. I expected to have to get a replacement, but a by putting one end in the vice, and using one of the old fork tubes for leverage it bent straight pretty easily, and rolling it on a flat surface proved that it was straight again.

I'm not convinced that the "Doughty" washers where the screw comes through the slider and screws into the bottom of the damper tube do any more than a bit of sealant would, but I had bought new ones so they went in. The springs are "progressive" although I can't see much different in the way the coil springs are wound, maybe it is the weight of the wire. I lubed everything with the 7.5 weight oil as I put it together and then I put in exactly 190cc as per the book. I left the forks stood on top of some paper towel for a couple of days to check that those little "Doughty" washers were doing their job, which they were.

Now I have the forks built I will get on with the new head bearings, and get them installed. It will start to look like I am making some progress if it carries on like this :) Oh, I haven't built that wheel yet!!
 

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Discussion Starter #87 (Edited)
Adventures in wheel building.

Well I have a built wheel!! does it count that having built and taken it apart about 3 times, sometimes with the help of my son, that I am now past the complete novice stage.

Here are some of the things I have learnt, I expect to see comments about my misunderstanding and just plain wrongness with some of this!

1. Using lubricant and anti-seize with stainless is to prevent galling and cold welding when building things up (not just wheels) as well as being able to get them apart in the future. Doesn't seem to matter what you use for our application, most of the hysteria seems to be about the nuclear industry and marine applications. I suspect with our application on primitive technology bikes goose fat would do :) However I personally did use copper grease! Somebody from the Galvanism religion is bound to comment!!

2. The videos on Youtube make wheel building look much easier than it is for a beginner. Some good ones are:- HD Wheel Truing guide, Pt.2 How To Lace And True A Motorcycle Wheel At D-Ray's Shop (I think the advice in this one is particularly helpful).

3. Finding the correct rim offset took some doing, everything seems to say measure what you already have. Initially I was going to use somebody's measurements from a T110 build website, see image. But then I found the measurement from the the BSA workshop manual for a conical rear hub. It states 2.8 inches from center line to chain wheel register. In researching this it seems there is a fair amount of tolerance. With some recommendations to position the rim nearer to the primary side for better handling. I think that within a couple of mill either way won't make a massive amount of difference, but I did try to get it as close to the BSA figure as possible.

4. Feel is more important than trigonometry! When you are tightening the nipples, some suddenly feel looser, some tighter (not a lot, but noticeable). Keeping to what feels like a similar tension seems to work best, rather than going with exactly the same number of degrees of turn. And 1/8th and 1/16th turns towards the end is enough, see my comment about chasing a few thou' later.

5. Don't be afraid to bend the angle of the spokes a bit to get them to sit better. But if you are like me, you will still feel they aren't quite right for a lot of the time. Go and look at a few different other wheels, you will realise yours are pretty good.

6. You will never get it perfect!!!!! I spent a lot of time moving the rim back and forth a few thou'. The rim I have also has a little protrusion where it was welded, and probably a little tolerance in the manufacture of it as well, just to keep me interested. I didn't have a truing stand so I put the wheel back into the rear forks, and used a pointer bungied to the rear shock, turning the spring gave up and down adjustment :)

7. How tight do you do the nipples? There are specific torque wrenches for this, but unless you doing a lot of wheels it is probably expensive, and if you are doing a lot of wheels you will probably develop the feel for it anyway. Seems that you don't need to go too tight, very low torque values seem to get mentioned most. However I have seen 40lbs and even 80lbs mentioned. I settled for making the ping of tapping the spokes, sound like a professionally built wheel, more of a thunk than a ting!!! How scientific is that! I am open to better advice though, do feel free!

I haven't put the tyre on yet, and I will be interested to see how it settles once I get the bike on the road.

I moved back to some more Powder Coating, I think I am getting addicted :)
 

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Discussion Starter #88
Powder Coating update.

I have bought some smooth chrome powder. I think it was intended to do car wheels.

Now before anybody gets the wrong idea, I don't intend to try to use it for all of the main chromed parts of the bike, but some of the things I might have powder coated black I am going to use the chrome on where it is appropriate. I am avoiding replacing everything with new, but do want it to look good.

Here are some of the results. I don't know how durable the chrome finish will be, but don't really see that it would be less than paint or other coloured powdercoat.

First the "P" clamps, which seem extremely expensive to replace, then the rear axle adjusters, and finally the center stand which has also been heated and straightened. Blasting and powder coating small items seems a very inexpensive and effective way to reuse parts that may have gone into the bin.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Since your wheel is apart you may consider these extended front brake levers for improved performance.
Bet you thought I was going to ignore this advice :) Did a bit of research on conical front brakes, and having been used to disks on my bikes, i decided to try to take advantage of your good council!!!

Took me a little while to find, but I got some extended levers. simple to fit, and I hope they will give me a bit more braking umph!
 

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Discussion Starter #90 (Edited)
Well, today it became a bike again. Whoop Whoop. Soon be onto thinking about the motor part :)

I fitted the "Charlies" filter. It is a Motao one machined from billet from Taiwan. It is very well made, with detailed instructions. Amusingly it suggests that you may have to adjust the bolt holes to fit. It said that the sump plate been machined to a higher standard than the original sump stud placement on the bike :) This proved to be true, but only a little filing was required.

I also fitted the newly straightened and powder coated centre stand, with a lovely new spring. The remade bolt hole was spot on, everything lined up great.

When I was attaching the front wheel, I decided to check the parts list to make sure I had everything to hand. I came across the interesting W3932 distance piece issue. It is clearly in the parts list, but when I checked through the parts I had when I stripped everything there was no sign. I spent an hour looking, but no trace of it could be found. I thought it might be possible that whoever fitted the new front wheel had lost it. So, a bit put out I decided to order one. Searching the Internet I came across a few forum posts about this part. It seems that the parts list is wrong, again. The part as show doesn't exist, although some posts did say that had bought a part and fitted it, but it didn't seem to actually do anything, just rattle around on the wheel spindle.

The rear wheel went on fine, and did use some distance pieces!! I had to put the tyre on the rim first though. I can't remember the last time I put a motorcycle tyre on by hand! Maybe I never have, but definitely did change some car tyres 40 years or so ago. Although not overly hard, it did take a bit of huffing and puffing using unused tyre levers bought about 20 years ago.

Very pleased with progress so far, but I am a long way behind where I thought I would be by now. Just a few more bits to do and I can start on the engine. I want to get the handlebars, footrests and all of the brakes sorted first, and really should think about painting the mudguards and tank while the weather is still OK.
 

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Wow. Just read through this thread. You have some dedication/stubbornness my friend. Well done on the progress so far!
 

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Hi Rem-

Great to see all of the progress. I must say, I'm a bit jealous with how far you've come, as I'm only looking to start reassembling my motor this weekend, and you've not got a full rolling bike! Thanks for the detailed posts and photos. This is super helpful and inspiring.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #94 (Edited)
Now I am retired from teaching I don't seem to have any time!! But I have made some progress, which I will try to catch up on.

I am continually looking online and at autojumbles (swap meets) for parts that may be useful. Not sure if this is a good idea, because you do end up buying things that you then decide not to use, or just for the fun of owning. :) The old wisdom is right, if you don't want to buy don't look. However, I noticed how expensive the handlebar switch gear is (relatively) and frequently they didn't look much better than what I had. This lead me to thinking about checking them out and perhaps rebuilding them.

I stripped the switch gear down, and the cases cleaned up quite well. Going for a working finish rather than show means that I think they are quite acceptable. I am after getting to having a reasonable running bike, maybe then I will go through it again improving the cosmetics. But I have realised that if I replace every part that has a blemish it is going to be a very expensive exercise. Even the levers cleaned up quite well, although a little bending was required for one of them :)

The flip switch toggles were both broken, so I bought a Lucas repair kit, which has all new with springs and a ball bearing.

I spent some time researching cleaning up old automotive wiring. For the brass coloured connectors there is a technique using white vinegar and salt, to clean them, then bicarbonate of soda to neutralize the acid, followed by contact spray to keep them clean. I made up a jar of each mix so that it can be reused. The alloy connectors don't respond to this as well, but it can't do them any harm, so a little abrasion as well should do. I didn't see anything about improving the look of the wire plastic and coatings, (advice welcome) eventually I may go back and use some shrink wrap to improve them.

Once cleaned and reassembled they seem to work great. I checked for continuity through the switches and they seem to work as expected. So I have fitted them.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
Mudguards (fenders) update.

I intended to blast and repaint the original fenders. I use ground glass, and as I don't have a large enough blast cabinet, I do it outside on a total loss basis. Checking the guards out, the rear didn't look too promising, the rust had eaten through in quite a few places, I still can't get over the fact that the underside of the guards are better than the tops!

Once I started blasting the rear guard it quickly became apparent that it wouldn't be worth trying to save it, so I decided to stop. If I was going to need new guards I though I might as well go for chrome/stainless for both, so I decided not to do the front guard either.
 

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Those switches look great!
 

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You can also try electrolysis to remove the rust. No abrasion so it's gentler than your blast gun. A tub of water, some sodium bicarbonate (PH+ for pools), a 12V battery charger and some sacrificial metal to use as an anode. Works pretty well, non-toxic and is pretty good about removing rust from ferrous metal without destroying it.
 

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Discussion Starter #99 (Edited)
Besides all of the other distractions of life, family projects, some contract work, accidentally buying another bike project (Sorry GPZ not yours, but it did start me thinking), and the start of Winter, I have one other issue that is stopping me starting (is that correct English) on my engine rebuild. The colour(s) of the casings.

I have soda blasted, used 3m mops, brass wire brush, steel wire brush, prayer, cream cleaner but there is still a mottled look to a lot of them, see the first and last picture. I have removed all of the corrosion (from the main surfaces, some further fettling of nooks and crannies still needed), and mechanically they seem fine, but I am stalling building the engine because of this, I am not sure if I need to cure it or not. Certainly it wont be a show finish, but if I can get it better I would like to.

So, all advice welcome.

I know some will say I should have had them vapour blasted, but all of the corrosion is gone, the surfaces (in the main) are sound and as smooth as new, just with a funny mottled colour. Would it make a difference if I had them done now?

I was considering using high temp aluminium paint, but think that wouldn't give the kind of look I was thinking of.

I have included some shots of me using my powder coating oven to remove the outer race of the main bearing, just for interest. It worked a treat, 20 mins at gas mark 6, 200c, and it dropped out with a gentle drop onto a handily placed piece of wood!!
 

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How did you clean your monkey metal switch covers ?
One of mine is really dirty + corroded inside.
These one job I'd contract outs and send it for vapor blasting, corrosion looks to severe for soda blasting.
 
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