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Discussion Starter #122
Mine are still going strong and holding pressure. The rear Avon Roadrider is coming up for replacement so I’ll switch out the valve stems and look at applying liquid insulation to the spoke nipples. I think the Loctite is probably not the best solution to cope with spoke movement and flex, given that it hardens into a crystalline form.
I’ve got all the worlds supply of the wide 2mm 3M tape so its easy enough to redo.
 

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Mine are still going strong and holding pressure. The rear Avon Roadrider is coming up for replacement so I’ll switch out the valve stems and look at applying liquid insulation to the spoke nipples. I think the Loctite is probably not the best solution to cope with spoke movement and flex, given that it hardens into a crystalline form.
I’ve got all the worlds supply of the wide 2mm 3M tape so its easy enough to redo.
There are a few types of clear sealant that are solvent based. Silicone isn't good because nothing sticks to it. and you are correct Loctite solidifies and becomes brittle.
 

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Discussion Starter #124
I use the liquid insulation from Jaycar for lots of things. It dries out and solidifies in the tin and is easily restored with acetone. I think this stuff has just the sort of flexibility and adhesion to cap the spoke nipples. It’ll be an overnight job at least to allow for curing.
The Loctite has all the utility of a chocolate teapot. It’s not really designed to do this task and I think it fails in the intersections between the dimples and spoke nipples due to stress.

Most silicones will indeed part from surfaces, as many roofers have found out the hard way. Some of the copolymer adhesive sealants really do stick but these are a bit messy to apply. I’m going with the insulation.
 

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I use the liquid insulation from Jaycar for lots of things. It dries out and solidifies in the tin and is easily restored with acetone. I think this stuff has just the sort of flexibility and adhesion to cap the spoke nipples. It’ll be an overnight job at least to allow for curing.
The Loctite has all the utility of a chocolate teapot. It’s not really designed to do this task and I think it fails in the intersections between the dimples and spoke nipples due to stress.

Most silicones will indeed part from surfaces, as many roofers have found out the hard way. Some of the copolymer adhesive sealants really do stick but these are a bit messy to apply. I’m going with the insulation.
I will bet that bonds well to the tape and the wheel, never heard of this stuff. Good find.
 

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A month later and many miles in the bag and they had both dropped less than 1lb. Happy with that.
I'm London based too, so I'd be curious to know what you ended up using as the Sealant? Was it the blue goo - in which case where did you source it?

Cheers

I picked up a rear puncture so was wondering about getting a shop to remove the tyre, then following your process.

Also whoever said green locktight is like a chocolate tea pot - as you sure? Even the blue stuff still feels a bit tacky when you pull out a fresh screw.
 

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Mine are still going strong and holding pressure. The rear Avon Roadrider is coming up for replacement so I’ll switch out the valve stems and look at applying liquid insulation to the spoke nipples. I think the Loctite is probably not the best solution to cope with spoke movement and flex, given that it hardens into a crystalline form.
I’ve got all the worlds supply of the wide 2mm 3M tape so its easy enough to redo.
It's great that what you've done is working for you. I don't think there is ONE good solution, in my case the loctite (on it's own) has been keeping air in my tires for over four years now, and I have no reason to believe that it's going to fail any time soon. If it does then it's a simple and quick fix anyhow. By the way loctite 290 doesn't harden and was designed to be a wicking sealant in the first place.
 

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I'm London based too, so I'd be curious to know what you ended up using as the Sealant? Was it the blue goo - in which case where did you source it?

Cheers
I bought this stuff: CAR TYRE SEALANT , TYRE PUNCTURE PREVENTION CAR PACK 4 pouches on eBay from a shop called tyre-sealant.

I had an interesting experience recently. I took the R to north Norfolk and was able to get some stints at high speed. The trip was about 300 miles and most of it was quite fast. A week later the rear tyre was completely flat. I pumped it up and used the bike for my slow speed commute to work and it has stayed inflated ever since, without dropping any pressure over the next couple of weeks.

I am going to collect the bike from the dealer today as it has been back to Triumph, as in the main company for a different issue and I am interested to know what they thought of it.
 

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Cheers for that.

The thing holding me back from embarking down this route is paying to have the tyre taken on and off (or forking out for a tool).
 

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2 weeks ago, I had a flat on the front, late in the afternoon about 70 km from home. I ended up riding home very slowly. The tyre was trashed, obviously. Ordered the Outex kit from ebay, turned up yesterday. Took the best part of 5 hours to remove the wheels, strip the tyres fit the kit and re-assemble. Had to patch the membrane on the front as I nicked it with a tyre lever. Now Ill travel with a plug/CO canister kit. Never want to get stuck again.
 

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Thanks to this thread I talked a friend into doing this conversion. 1 month on he is well chuffed and enjoying a relatively are free tubeless ride. I will be doing this to my Thruxton S soon. Thanks to all involved and all the input.
 

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Another Thumbs-Up for Outex Conversion Kit

I'll add my name to the list of folks who have used the Outex kit to convert my T120 spoked rims to tubeless. Very satisfied. It's been 4 months and 1500 miles (it is winter) and not even a leak. And since it is winter and the Bonnie has been sitting in the shop sipping away on the Battery Tender, I am pleased to report pressures are still good. I have been riding for 40 years and it has been my experience that tubeless rims lose some pressure during winter layovers.

I purchased my kit on e-Bay for $133. I was getting new rubber put on my bike, so I coughed up another $120 for the dealer to install the Outex kit for me. They made it clear they could not warranty the conversion, but privately the mechanic told me he has installed over a hundred of these kits and I shouldn't sweat it.

So far so good. Now I can leave the tire/tyre irons, patches and glue home, and just bring my Aerostich plug-and-compressor set.
 

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Outex seems to be the way to go.

Compared to buying Alpina tubeless rims, giving the Outex kit a try seems to be a "no brainer". Especially after reading the testimonials on this thread. Also, the fact that A&J Cycles sells the kit lends a lot of credibility. I've got it on my list to do when I change tires for the first time on my T120!
 

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Discussion Starter #135 (Edited)
Swapped out tyres after around 11,000 km . Went for the Michelin Pilot Road 4’s . While at it , gave the tubeless conversion the new look with a different method of sealing the spoke nipples. I picked up the info from some of the sport bike forums and it seems these guys have been doing this successfully for a few years, with and without tape.

The original tape job with Loctite had done pretty well but I don’t think the Loctite is the best for this situation and doesn’t appear to be an effective seal. Maybe on the threads , but around the nipples , nope! Although others have had success on different wheels. I’ve also replaced the valve stems with better units.

1/ Original tape still holding up. Note bubbling around spoke nipples. Gouges and dings are all mine on removal.

2/ Wheel prepared for tape . I used a rotary wire brush and small pick to remove any vestige of the tape from around and in the centre of the nipples. The original tape came off with patience and a hot hair dryer to soften it up .
After this , a firm toothbrush with meths then afterward acetone, as well as compressed air to get any remaining crap out of the crevices and threads.
E6000 is an industrial adhesive , not unlike UHU, and it’s available on eBay in 110ml tubes . One tube is enough to do both wheels and this stuff sticks. Just use the supplied fine nozzle and push this into the spoke hole first . This displaces air and it’ll ooze around the nozzle . A quick circle around the nipple 😁 without applying too much and on to the next.
Repeat when tacky to build up the seal. Don’t squeeze too much as this stuff is fairly thin but seems to set up fairly quickly.
I let this cure for half a day and taped in the usual manner , stretching allowed the tape to find the natural place without effort.

3/ Finished wheel ready for tyre. I applied a bead of E6000 around the edge of the tape. It’s pretty easy to disturb the tape when fitting the tyre on the narrow front rim and this can only help.
 

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Just came across this thread. A couple of years ago I went through this with my Tiger 800 and intend doing it on my Thruxton and S Scrambler.

I used Sika Automotive Adhesive Sealer to seal each nipple. I did this partly to be able to adjust spokes if need be but also to prevent water seeping in under the tape.

For tape I used Gorilla tape. Not my first choice but the best I could get at the time. I’ve since got my hands on some 3M 4411N Extreme Sealing Tape which I plan to use in future, although I’d happily use the Gorilla tape again if I had to.

Valve stems were Street Triple. These worked well but I did have trouble sealing one of them at first for the reasons pointed out by @jsobell previously with the valve stems he used.

To hold the wheels to work on I used a paddock/race stand with length of rod for an axle. Simple and portable - I did it in my lounge room.

On the Tiger only the rear wheel has the safety rim and the conversion worked perfectly, holding air with no loss for several months. Unfortunately the front is not a tubeless rim and this ultimately made the conversion not really feasible. I simply couldn’t get the the tyre to bead up even with the high pressure air hose at the bike shop. If I couldn’t do it there what hope would I have with a foot pump in the bush! I had no option but to put a tube back in.

This got me thinking. With a tube in a sealed rim I had the best of both worlds, especially for an adventure bike. I could run lower pressures off-road and not risk the tyre popping off the bead in rough country and I could still plug a puncture to get me out of trouble. Even with a little (if any - I’ve sealed that too) air leaking round the valve stem I could still inflate the tyre and ride. So I’ve done the same on the rear; put a tube in it. I might even drill a second hole for a tubeless valve stem as back up if the tube is completely shredded.
 

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As was mentioned earlier in thread there are many ways to skin this cat. I did the rear on my T120 about a month ago after picking up a disposable blade in the relatively new tire. I used a patch/plug from the inside of the tire then used this method for sealing the wheel. So far so good. I also used a straight NAPA motorcycle valve stem. I ordered the 90 degree type from ebay but didn't like the quality. I have enough tape left to do the front but I'm holding off for now. I just clamped the wheel in my workmate while working on it and it hasn't leaked so far.
 

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That’s a good video except I’d caution AGAINST fitting the original rim tape over the sealing tape as he did at the end of the process. I also did that on my Tiger rim. The problem with it is that without the tube valve stem going through it there is nothing to locate in place. Even though it sits tight, with the centrifugal force it will inevitably move. Mine did and it was only when I tried to deflate the tyre that I realised this had happened. In effect it turns the valve stem into a one way valve. The rubber sits over the hole allowing air to go in but not out. With a straight stem this isn’t so much a problem because you can remove the valve core and push some wire or small screw driver in the hole and lift the rubber away. But with an angled stem this proved to be quite a problem. If you do want to use the rim tape, find some way of ensuring the hole in the tape stays over the hole in the valve stem.
 

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CanberraR3, good point. I did re-use the rim strap. The NAPA valve stem does sit a bit proud on the inside of the rim, so I enlarged the stem hole in the strap and so far this hasn't happened. Hopefully it won't. It was interesting to note though, that strap is made from what seems to be polypropylene rather than rubber.
 

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Another tubeless convert

This thread provided a lot of good information. I wanted the best chance of only doing this once without a problem so I went with the Outex kit. There is already enough info in this thread so I won't repeat things already well covered but wanted to add a couple of things. My bike is a 2018 T120 with chrome wheels. Both wheels have the safety lip normally found on tubeless wheels so we can get that concern out of the way. The very smooth chrome surface includes the entire inside of the wheel and doesn't look like the best surface for tape adhesion. I used roloc discs and 220 grit sandpaper to remove the shine where the tape goes. I think this was essential because I didn't hit the nipple heads much and the stick on dots Outex supplies to cover those areas would not stick.

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Approximately 2 years ago in this thread Jsobell suggested that the wheel from a Razor scooter might be helpful to seal the tape down. I got one of those wheels and made a simple handle for it. In my opinion, don't bother trying this, it didn't help much. It would probably be more helpful without the handle because it would be easier to apply pressure. What worked best for me was my thumbs and the box end of a small combo wrench.

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Chuck
 
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