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The T120 is my first bike that doesn't have tubeless tires. Any suggestions on what kind of emergency patching kit would be good to carry on long trips?
 

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Welcome to the world of tubed tyres. Ha! A pain in the arse, as I discovered only 300 miles from new. There is no emergency plugging. The best thing is to make sure you have good breakdown cover.

That said, some people swear by a product called Slime, which you put in the tubes and run with all the time. The theory being that Slime stops the punctures from deflating the tyre. I've no experience of it, other than I've now put it in my tyres and hope I don't have another "stuck out in the middle of nowhere on a bank holiday and it's at least 5 hours before the breakdown truck gets to you, and when he does he can't fix it anyway because he's carrying plugs, which are useless on a tubed tyre, thus needing a further wait for a trailer to a garage". :smile2:
 

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Its a long time since I had to make an emergency repair on a tube and it was only for off road . So I don't know where you would find a heavy duty patching kit but purely as a get you home fix a puncture repair kit from a cycle shop would get you mobile and fit a new tube as soon as possible . You will obviously need something to dismount the punctured tyre and remove the tube before you can patch it . And don't forget to remove whatever caused the puncture in the first place . My brother works as a patrolman for the AA and here in the lake district the majority of cars that puncture have ripped a hole in the sidewall from driving too close to the edge of the road trying to pass on our narrow lanes with sharp slate on the side , not repairable at all .
 

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The best solution is to go tubeless by sealing the wire wheels. If you Google "sealing wire wheels for tubeless" you will find a whole lot ways you can do this. Most wire wheel builders like Buchanans, Central Wheel, Devon wheels and Canyon offer this service, but you can do it yourself, no problem. My bikes wheels have been sealed and running without tubes for 2½ years now and I only wish I had done it sooner.
 

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FWIW, my T120 is the latest of nine bikes, my first bought in 1974. None of them has had tubeless tires, and I've never had a flat.

As far as tire repair tools to carry goes, the first step, front or rear, is to remove the wheel. In the rear on the T120, that means removing both mufflers. You'd also need a break-over bar and the correct sized socket. Once the wheel is off, you'd need a pair of rim levers and a tire patching kit. Removing the front wheel would involve some way of lifting the frame with the bike on the center stand so that the front wheel is clear of the ground. You'd need the tools above plus a 17mm hex driver for the front axle.....

Getting the picture? :)

Patching a tube is basically not possible with a few simple hand tools. If it was a long trip, I would pack along a can of some kind of tire repair goo. Otherwise, I'd just jot down my insurance company's roadside assistance phone number and plan on staying with the bike until it was repaired.
 

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Oh, oh...now you've done it!

Yup! That will take care of it. In 45 years of driving my '71 Daytona T100R around on tube tires, I never had a puncture or other kind of flat--not one! Just thinking about that while driving my '14 Bonneville T100 resulted in a ring shank nail in the rear tire I'm not sure how the tire gods find out about this stuff but it's best to keep those thoughts out of your head.
 

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I'm surprised there's not a cast wheel option for the T120. The wheels and tires for the Twin and 120 are identical in size.
The cast wheels with the red stripe would look good on the T120 black. As would the brushed exhaust from the Twin. So yeah, a Street Twin with the 1200 plant :)

Hey it's just my opinion.
 

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Oh, oh...now you've done it!

Yup! That will take care of it. In 45 years of driving my '71 Daytona T100R around on tube tires, I never had a puncture or other kind of flat--not one! Just thinking about that while driving my '14 Bonneville T100 resulted in a ring shank nail in the rear tire I'm not sure how the tire gods find out about this stuff but it's best to keep those thoughts out of your head.
Oh, crap! Sorry!
 

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And that accounts for why I got a flat 300 miles from new. I remember (incorrectly) thinking "ah good, tubeless tyres, I'll be able to patch those" (Yes, I know, I hadn't figured on / didn't know about the tube inside, assuming Triumph had sealed the rims.)

Never ever think about, shhh, you know what.
 

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I have lots of pithy words of wisdom to spout on this subject but I am definitely saying nowt .
 

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I have no direct experience of it, but this stuff
http://www.bikeseal.com/
is supposed to be good for both tubed and tubeless and it is water solvent so is easy to clean .
A bit expensive but then so is getting a flat and needing rescue.
 

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Had a rear tyre puncture last Saturday two up 10 miles from homes it's a tubed tyre and the T120 " toolkit " is somewhat lacking so I called the RAC was put on hold as they are busy, the breakdown that came with Carol Nash arrived within the Hour,,,,,,,,,, I would suggest having a good look at, or practice rear wheel removal. To remove the Silencers you need to dismantle the passengers foot pegs ( beware a 3mm ball bearing is loose once you remove the cotter pin ) because you have to use a Allen key on one side and 12mm spanner to stop the bolt rotating, for the rear wheel spindle nut I used 26mm combination spanner it's quite straight forward, as for carrying a spare tube and tyre levers not recommended for road side repair. I have had a new tube fitted to-day £29 and all is back and ready to go.. Those passenger foot pegs idiotic,,, David
 
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