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I have had two bikes that I upgraded the suspension on and found them both to be great afterwards. The first was a KLR that I out progressive springs in the forks. It rode so much better! The second was an '01 R1150GS that I put a set of Yacugars on. Afterwards it transformed a good riding bike into an extremely planted bike with a firm but plush ride.

I am thinking of a suspension upgrade for my '18 T120. I'd like to hear only from Triumph riders that have installed new suspensions on their bikes. Have the upgrades transformed the bike or just improved? What did you do? Incidentally, I weight around 240 lbs. I typically ride around 8000 miles per year (down from the 20k of the past).

Thanks!
 

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There are a few very positive reports (no negatives) from people that have done both shocks and forks on this forum. Hopefully more will chime in. I done searching on Google regarding this issue but most results are for the air cooled models. I have a set of Bitubo shocks and a Matris fork kit setting on my work bench right now. Once I get over a lingering illness they will go on and I will add to the info. I went ahead and ordered these parts right away because, like you, I have upgraded suspension on my other bikes and what a difference it made.

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There are a few very positive reports (no negatives) from people that have done both shocks and forks on this forum. Hopefully more will chime in. I done searching on Google regarding this issue but most results are for the air cooled models. I have a set of Bitubo shocks and a Matris fork kit setting on my work bench right now. Once I get over a lingering illness they will go on and I will add to the info. I went ahead and ordered these parts right away because, like you, I have upgraded suspension on my other bikes and what a difference it made.

Chuck
I've done the same searching and really found very little. I did find that some Hagons actually have a shorter stroke and bottom out more than stock but do provide a nice ride before that. Hmm.
 

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I started a separate thread a few days ago and in the process of upgrading my suspension. I’m going with K-Tech RazorLites in the rear and their Tracker fork cartridges in the front.

Art
 

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Chiming in to be sure I don’t miss the developments.

I ride a 2016 T120, I am 190lbs and 5’10 and sometimes ride 2 up. Nothing very sporty, but often bumpy streets and roads.

I found the forks to be a bit unforgiving (but then I am still riding Pirelli Phantoms, I could try something else before talking of fork upgrades).

Anyways, a listener of weighted advice.

NN
 

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Ashman I have definitely upgraded suspension before on my air cooled Thruxton,but it gets more use at track days. For what a T120 was designed for the springy bits are totally fine. You are not racing or doing track days . I weigh 75 kg and have no problem with the stock setup . If I wanted a more sporting ride at over legal speeds I would have got Thruxton R
 

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I have found the suspension on the SS to be the single worst thing about the bike, and not at all tolerable. I am definitely looking into options.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There was nothing wrong with the stock suspension on my GS either but the transformation of the ride with a set of Yacugars was phenomenal! I started this thread by asking to hear from those that have done upgrades and it appears that there are few that have done upgrades or the ones that have do not subscribe to this board, have not seen this thread, or choose to not respond. All are good.
 

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I weigh 70-80 pounds more, have over 5000 miles (time for tires too), and ride fast. Most of the miles were also in extreme temperatures ( way above 100 degrees. Regardless, I am just looking for the experiences of those that have put on new shocks, both good and bad. I probably won't do suspension work right now but will wait, and then when I do I will question why I waited so long as it will be an all new bike that is better still.
 

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Ikon USA

Not a T120 owner at the moment, but if/when I am I will go with Ikon shocks. (Hagon and Progressive did not help my Bonneville.) The dampening adjustment is the key to a good rear shock in my experience along with the correct spring for your weight.

https://www.ikonshocksusa.com/
 

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Thanks! These look good and I will talk with them. I am also going to contact Ted Porter at the Beemer Shop and discuss Wilbers and Yacugars with him The Ikons are a little less though............
 

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My 2013 Thruxton is famous for a poor stock suspension, particularly if your weight is on the light side. After much reading went with a Hagon 2810 setup at the rear and Ricor Intiminators at the front. There is much written about both on this site. The Hagons have two way adjustability and a number of different options as to the look and color. Would definitely recommend you add them to your list to check out.

Results for me were a better planted ride, no pogoing or fork diving when braking, and most importantly, relief for my back from the pounding due bumps, potholes and other road irregularities.

You will likely find a lot of options out there so it's important to be clear on defining your problem - what you are trying to solve. Otherwise you'll get confused and start going around in circles. Do the homework and read up! Only then will you be happy in applying your chosen resolution.
 

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Ashman I have definitely upgraded suspension before on my air cooled Thruxton,but it gets more use at track days. For what a T120 was designed for the springy bits are totally fine. You are not racing or doing track days . I weigh 75 kg and have no problem with the stock setup . If I wanted a more sporting ride at over legal speeds I would have got Thruxton R
I have had my 2013 Thruxton from new and the now new Thruxon 1200 S the suspension is a lot better than the stock suspension on the old Thruxton but after a few months I upgraded the front and rear suspension went Racetec Eculators and Liner springs for my weight up front and got conned into Gazi rear shocks on the back was never happy with the Gazi shocks and one blew a main seal in less than 12 months old ended up with Ikons on the rear this was the best set up ever and the bike handled great rode stuck to the road a lot better and handle every bump put to it, I intend to do the same set up on the new Thruxton, I don't like just having spring adjustment on the rear shocks, I want to put my Ikons on it but the new Thruxton shocks are 1 1/2" longer than the old Thruxton so will have to save up my pennies, the front end is so far good but a set of Racetes springs will be going in it, the good thing about Ikons they can be rebuilt and will last a life time, my old Koni's on my Norton have been on it for 38 years now and only rebuilt 5 years ago for the first time, having dampers that can be adjusted as well the springs, I push my bikes to their limits in the twisties and having the right set up is the way to go for, stock suspension is not up to it and they get worst the more miles put on them.

Ashley
 

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The T120 is no Thruxton S or R and cannot be pushed to its limits as the ground clearance is not great when trying to push on twisty roads. I can understand heavier blokes wanting a bit more comfort on snotty roads. I still stand by my statement that at legal speeds the stock set up on the Bonnie 1200 is better than some other bikes I have ridden. Personal choice to spend $$$ on after market suspension, If I want to go for a good thrash I'll take the old 904 Thruxton to a track day to get my fix. By the way she has Bitubo gas cartridges and YSS shocks for that purpose.
 

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The T120 is no Thruxton S or R and cannot be pushed to its limits as the ground clearance is not great when trying to push on twisty roads. I can understand heavier blokes wanting a bit more comfort on snotty roads. I still stand by my statement that at legal speeds the stock set up on the Bonnie 1200 is better than some other bikes I have ridden. Personal choice to spend $$$ on after market suspension, If I want to go for a good thrash I'll take the old 904 Thruxton to a track day to get my fix. By the way she has Bitubo gas cartridges and YSS shocks for that purpose.
Completely agree. My stock T120 is totally adequate for the around town use I put it to.

However, that didn’t stop me from putting Progressive suspensions on two Rockets and a T-Bird. Not for this bike.

I saw a video on Hagon Nitros for the T120. You have to custom order them. They have preload and 10 dampening settings. They have fork springs also.

https://youtu.be/jmg91Rbph7M
 

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I have upgraded the front forks of my T120 to TEC progressive springs and the rears to a set of Bitubo “dark edition” shocks for the rear.
The ride is more refined and more resilient to bumps and holes in the road. Worth while upgrades all round - especially the front forks for the cost!
 

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I have also made changes to the suspension of my T120:

Shocks and cartridge kit from Bitubo (shocks WMTA2V2, cartridge JBH12WO)
Tires Continental Road Attack 3
Brake discs from the Thruxton R

Result: With the floating discs from the Thruxton R, the squeaking of the brakes is completely gone. The weight save at the front wheel is 1500 g. The handling is improved.

The new Bitubo WMTA2V2 has hydraulic spring preload. They are 10 mm longer than the origin shocks. The bike feels more agile, turn in the curve feels lighter, the pumping back has disappeared and also the dip in when breaking.

The tires are great, give a lot of confidence.

It's like a new bike now. I can not say what exactly is due to the changes in the suspension, the new tires or the break discs, because I changed everything at once.

Note: With the longer shocks the wheel clearance on the central stand is not sufficiant for lubing the chain.
The Bitubo shock has a piston of only 30 mm (compared to 36 mm with Öhlins e.g.), which may be too weak for heavier riders.

Kind regards Zbude
 
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