Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
2014 Scrambler
Joined
·
501 Posts
That makes perfect sense. Easier to just buy a pre-wired harness, I guess. Any suggestions for a good quality harness?
Sorry, but I cannot think of one. I'm not sure anything out there would fit the two connectors for the OEM horn wires. However, since the horn tabs are approximately the same as the spade connectors on the relay, those two connectors are done. Some relays come with a harness connection that provide you about 4" of wire for you to do with as you will, for example these here. Is this what you were thinking about? It is a full-sized relay, so about 40% bigger than a micro relay. It could still fit somewhere on the bike. You could attach the leads to 85 and 86 to spade connectors and attach them to the OEM horn wires, and then just wire splice the leads to pins 30 and 87 to your power and ground lines, respectively.
All in all, it could be a good two-three hours of work if you aren't used to pulling the tank, running electrical, crimping/soldering, etc., but none of it is difficult, just a series of simple steps.
 

·
Registered
2017 Triumph T120
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Sorry, but I cannot think of one. I'm not sure anything out there would fit the two connectors for the OEM horn wires. However, since the horn tabs are approximately the same as the spade connectors on the relay, those two connectors are done. Some relays come with a harness connection that provide you about 4" of wire for you to do with as you will, for example these here. Is this what you were thinking about? It is a full-sized relay, so about 40% bigger than a micro relay. It could still fit somewhere on the bike. You could attach the leads to 85 and 86 to spade connectors and attach them to the OEM horn wires, and then just wire splice the leads to pins 30 and 87 to your power and ground lines, respectively.
All in all, it could be a good two-three hours of work if you aren't used to pulling the tank, running electrical, crimping/soldering, etc., but none of it is difficult, just a series of simple steps.
I was more thinking of something like this: wiring harness
 

·
Registered
2014 Scrambler
Joined
·
501 Posts
I was more thinking of something like this: wiring harness
That looks good. I don’t have any experience with that brand, but that’s all the components you’ll need to make it work. I would recommend first deciding where you want to install the horn before you determine if you need the three or four foot long harness. Nice find. If that’s what you choose please post your thoughts on the harness quality and install for others.
 

·
Registered
2017 Triumph T120
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
That looks good. I don’t have any experience with that brand, but that’s all the components you’ll need to make it work. I would recommend first deciding where you want to install the horn before you determine if you need the three or four foot long harness. Nice find. If that’s what you choose please post your thoughts on the harness quality and install for others.
Yes, I'll have to wait until I get the bike back from winter storage. Will probably get their splitter as well, in case I ever want to install a second horn. Found eaternbeaver just searching but they have a lot of positive reviews on many forums, so that's good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
Recommended - yes, absolutely. Required - maybe yes, maybe no. It is plug and play, the two wire connectors from the bike slip right over the two tabs on the horn. When I first installed the horn that's what I did. Those wires are small, like 18 gauge or something, and the SB Mini pulls 5 amps vs the 1.2A from the stock horn. Granted, it's for a short period of time, so I'm sure there won't be a catastrophic melt down. The difference came in function/performance. While running off the stock wires, I noticed that the horn wouldn't sound when the bike was not running unless my battery was perfectly topped up on the charger. It's part of my pre-ride checks before I start engine.
I was going to install lights and heated grips, with had me doing some moderate electrical work so I just included the horn relay as part of the overall accessory update. The horn now sounds during my pre-ride check, and state safety inspection without the engine running, AND its sounds a lot louder. I guess the higher resistance of the thinner wires chewed up some loudness.
So, "yes" to both parts of your question: It is recommended, and the unit is plug and play.


Same here. I had a younger driver turn left across my path of travel and I panic stopped and went down on a front tire loss of traction. So his fault and my fault. I read a few books after a self-imposed hiatus and now am adjusting speed all the time - normal pace, drop 5-10 when I see something off or am in a danger zone, just to get more reaction time and less stopping distance - and practicing breaking. I also started using the horn a lot more though before there's an issue. Honk to help the other driver's awareness, hope they take a second, longer look at the approaching bike. I really do think that inattentive blindness - not expecting to see a motorcycle or only looking out for other cars, which are the threats to other cars - affects a lot of people, but also some people may see the motorcycle but be unable to judge speed or distance. Let's face it, driver's do not get a lot of practice observing motorcycles, so I think there is a general lack of the ability to judge distance and closing speed. We don't have much of a horizontal visual queue - the same between two headlights, two seat headrests, a bumper/grill - that get's wider at a certain rate as we approach at a certain rate. The kid who cut in front of me said I was going too fast; I was using ESR's app and I was at 28mph. So he saw me, but wasn't able to determine my speed correctly to judge how much time he had to make his turn. That's what got me thinking about how we determine how much time we have to make a turn in front of another automobile.


Hope you never go down. How do you like riding with the vest? Is it noticeable wearing it, feel restricting at all, does the weight wear out your neck and shoulders quicker?
I was out yesterday, New England rare warm day--a number of ex bikers came up--many Triumph Riders. One guy has given up riding simply due to the number of distracted drivers on the road. He said his freak out was a woman texting and almost hitting him while he sat at a traffic light. He had seen her distance closing in through his mirror, turned around and yelled. She locked up, tapped the rear of his bike. He lives to tell but after 40 years of riding he's hanging up his helmet. I am not hanging up mine but every intersection (driveways inclusive), business district where people might left or right in front of me across lanes, is monitored beyond what I used to be vigilant about. On the upside, puttering slower feels age appropriate for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
When I was a junk snot nosed kid starting out on bikes in the 60's an old timer told me that riding a motorcycle and not dying requires 100% your concentration 100% of the time and that the one car you don't see is the one that will kill you.

I'm still here 66 years later and still riding. Glad I was paying attention.
I started riding (minibike) in the early 1970s. You hit the nail on the head--100% concentration.
 

·
Registered
2014 Scrambler
Joined
·
501 Posts
I started riding (minibike) in the early 1970s. You hit the nail on the head--100% concentration.
Agreed. I've often thought about going for rides to "clear my head" but always opted out of it. I don't ride angry, frustrated, or tired. A lot of drivers are crazy or inattentive, and if too many instances happen too quickly, I just pull over and drink some water for how ever long it takes. I mess up, too. I try (and sometimes fail) not to get angry but rather find contentment in the fact that I paid attention, made some adjustments, and/or was prepared enough to avoid an accident - so congratulate myself and get back at it rather than get angry at the other driver. Still, some times things are egregious enough that you lose it. Pull over and take a moment.
 

·
Registered
2017 Triumph T120
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
QUESTION: Looking at the Haynes manual for the >2016 T120, the horn already has a relay. Would I then, need to install a second relay for an aftermarket horn that draws more amps? Does relay on relay cause issues?

Automotive tire Font Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system
 

·
Registered
2014 Scrambler
Joined
·
501 Posts
QUESTION: Looking at the Haynes manual for the >2016 T120, the horn already has a relay. Would I then, need to install a second relay for an aftermarket horn that draws more amps? Does relay on relay cause issues?

View attachment 777012
I would then say no. The Wiring diagram available on-line doesn't show a relay, but I'm not up on my T120s. Pull the relay and see if the horn still works. If not, then I'd say there's a good chance you are good to plug and play.
 

·
Registered
2014 Thruxton
Joined
·
458 Posts
I was out yesterday, New England rare warm day--a number of ex bikers came up--many Triumph Riders. One guy has given up riding simply due to the number of distracted drivers on the road. He said his freak out was a woman texting and almost hitting him while he sat at a traffic light. He had seen her distance closing in through his mirror, turned around and yelled. She locked up, tapped the rear of his bike. He lives to tell but after 40 years of riding he's hanging up his helmet. I am not hanging up mine but every intersection (driveways inclusive), business district where people might left or right in front of me across lanes, is monitored beyond what I used to be vigilant about. On the upside, puttering slower feels age appropriate for me.
I pretty much avoid riding anywhere except less traveled highways, no cities or superslab. To many damned cars.
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top