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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all-
I ride a 2022 T120, and love it. I put about 6K on the clock last season, and plan to do the same or more this year. In addition to it being my usual daily driver, I use it for multi day touring. I do my best to stay off of highways and interstates, and mostly stick to 2 lane blacktop, i.e. no cruising, but generally more 'spirited' riding.
I've begun to get some pretty consistent tension/pain on the lower right side of my neck, just above the shoulder blade, sometimes after riding for less than an hour. So, I'm curious if others have experienced this with this bike, and if so, what have you done about it?
I have tweaked bar position a little bit (most recently rolling it forward and up), but have not been able to push it as far as I'd like to try, mostly due to interference from the ferrule of the master cylinder brake line hitting the right fork cap. The right control seems to have very little rotational movement available. I have worked on bikes in the past that have had an internal pin on the control housing that rides in a short 'limiter' slot in the handlebars, and so wonder if this is the case with the T120 controls. Let me know if you know before I take it apart to check.....
I looked at some past threads and the parts mentioned in those discussions, and it seems that some of those parts are no longer available, such as the short spacers, which seemed like the first option I would try, as opposed to 'real' risers or new bars.
As for me, I'm 6' 1" 180lbs, and have already replaced the stock seat with a British Customs model, which probably gave me a lift of maybe 3/4", which alleviated some minor right knee pain I was experiencing on longer rides with the original stock seat.
Any ideas or insights welcome!
Thanks,
ECJ
 

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2019 T100 Black
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I've installed 30mm Super Corse Riser Spacers plus I have a Burton seat. The combination has made the ride comfortable.
 
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2018 Street Triple R 765
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Two things as to your neck pain:
Is it possible to reduce the weight of your helmet and any attachments on it?
Second, try to train yourself to adopt a posture of "chin up" by 5 or 10 degrees.
 
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2020 Speed Twin
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Along with adjusting the handlebars, are you riding with a backpack on? I haven’t done much commuting on my Speed Twin yet, but I think the REI daypack I use has contributed to some of my neck and back pain on my R3. Whenever I would ride without the backpack, my neck and back felt significantly better.
 

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I have a bad neck and try to get my riding position as upright as possible with my neck in a neutral position. Check this out:

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have 1" risers I bought from a forum member. I don't think he makes them anymore unfortunately. If I didn't have these risers I'd look at Motone up and over risers.
Yes, it was the forum member risers I was thinking of, but I guess those are no more.
I always forget about Motone....will definitely take a look at those!
ECJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've installed 30mm Super Corse Riser Spacers plus I have a Burton seat. The combination has made the ride comfortable.
The Super Corse risers look a lot like the ones the forum member was making (or maybe it's vice versa). Thanks for suggesting! This was the direction I had first wanted to try.
ECJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Along with adjusting the handlebars, are you riding with a backpack on? I haven’t done much commuting on my Speed Twin yet, but I think the REI daypack I use has contributed to some of my neck and back pain on my R3. Whenever I would ride without the backpack, my neck and back felt significantly better.
No backpack for me, as I hate the sensation of riding with one, and can imagine how they could definitely add stress elsewhere...
ECJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Two things as to your neck pain:
Is it possible to reduce the weight of your helmet and any attachments on it?
Second, try to train yourself to adopt a posture of "chin up" by 5 or 10 degrees.
I typically ride with a Shoei RF1200 (soon to be replaced with a 1400). No GoPro/camera, nothing.
I'm sure I could some posture improvements though!
What is interesting, is that I don't really get this neck pain (or certainly no where near as intense) on any of my other bikes, so do feel it is something pretty specific to the T120 set up.
ECJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Check this out:

These are looking good! 1" up and 1" back and with stock cables, and fairly reasonable at sub $200 bucks.
I had the idea today to take some photos of my riding position on different bikes I ride (and that don't cause the same neck pain of course!) and then do a quick comparison to see if I can spot any similarities/differences before investing too much time and money in anything, as the riser/spacer/bar change can get complex, time consuming and expensive quickly. Might speed up the experiment process at least, and maybe save some time and money in the end.
Thanks for the recommendation!
ECJ
 

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I typically ride with a Shoei RF1200 (soon to be replaced with a 1400). No GoPro/camera, nothing.
I'm sure I could some posture improvements though!
What is interesting, is that I don't really get this neck pain (or certainly no where near as intense) on any of my other bikes, so do feel it is something pretty specific to the T120 set up.
ECJ
I often got the same pain on my Street Twin. After paying attention I discovered it was caused to some degree by throttle movement and fit. Changed from the OEM "skinny" grips to the factory "barrel" grips and most of the pain went away.

Was a loyal Shoei RF user for decades and recently bought a new Arai. Equivalent safety and felt a lot lighter with less buffeting than the RF-1200 or RF-1400.

Pretty much right shoulder blade pain free now. If I could solve my other ailments as easily I'd be a happy guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I often got the same pain on my Street Twin. After paying attention I discovered it was caused to some degree by throttle movement and fit. Changed from the OEM "skinny" grips to the factory "barrel" grips and most of the pain went away.

Was a loyal Shoei RF user for decades and recently bought a new Arai. Equivalent safety and felt a lot lighter with less buffeting than the RF-1200 or RF-1400.

Pretty much right shoulder blade pain free now. If I could solve my other ailments as easily I'd be a happy guy.
Interesting....which Arai are you running? I have almost purchased an Arai on numerous occasions, but have stayed with Shoei because the fit is so good for me, but maybe now is the time to try since it's time to replace the 6 year old RF1200 anyway.....I have heard the fit/head shape is similar.
Also interesting note on the grips. Even though I have large hands, I tend to prefer minimal and slim grips, but I think I'll give these a shot. I had a buddy who tried the same on a BMW 1200GS, but found by going to a larger grip, he actually gripped harder, rather than in a more relaxed way, but I think what you are saying is that the larger grip changes your general throttle position to some degree, is that correct? I'm running factory heated grips on this bike. Do you know if these are compatible?
Also still hoping someone can weigh in on the allowable rotational movement of the controls in general, and whether or not there is a limiter pin or similar, as when messing with mine there seems to be very little movement available.
Thanks for all of the great input and comments so far. Very much appreciated!
ECJ
 

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I would suggest a change of handlebars.

You don't need them up and back. When you grip the stock bars you are rotating your elbows and shoulders to fit the bars, i.e. almost 90' to the direction you are facing when sitting on the bike. If you stand and let your arms fall to your sides, you will notice that your fists, when lightly clenched, are angled about 30' inward to the front. That is the angle you need for the bars to be at.

So the bars should be a little wider, maybe a little higher, with the grips angled a little more -'V' shaped towards the front of the bike. You know - cruiser bars. Perhaps like the Bobber?

And no, the barrel shaped grips are not compatible with the heated grips. At least they aren't on my '20 T120.

My $.02 FWIW.

Cheers!

G
 

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Interesting....which Arai are you running? I have almost purchased an Arai on numerous occasions, but have stayed with Shoei because the fit is so good for me, but maybe now is the time to try since it's time to replace the 6 year old RF1200 anyway.....I have heard the fit/head shape is similar.
Also interesting note on the grips. Even though I have large hands, I tend to prefer minimal and slim grips, but I think I'll give these a shot. I had a buddy who tried the same on a BMW 1200GS, but found by going to a larger grip, he actually gripped harder, rather than in a more relaxed way, but I think what you are saying is that the larger grip changes your general throttle position to some degree, is that correct? I'm running factory heated grips on this bike. Do you know if these are compatible?
Also still hoping someone can weigh in on the allowable rotational movement of the controls in general, and whether or not there is a limiter pin or similar, as when messing with mine there seems to be very little movement available.
Thanks for all of the great input and comments so far. Very much appreciated!
ECJ
I found that with the larger grips I didn't have to exert as much force to control the throttle.
That helped a lot especially at constant throttle position.

I opted for the Arai Regent-X. Has a larger opening makes it easier on and off.
I always wore a medium Shoei but the small Arai fits me better.
 

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These are very personal matters. Although I have to lean more forward in my new T120 than I did with my Street Scrambler, I've found the position to be even a bit more comfortable for me. No major difference, though.

My personal weak link is a recurring bursitis in my upper leg (/bum), requiring a soft surface seat + taking breaks to strech frequently enough.
 

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These are very personal matters
Aint that the truth?

@ECJJCE The T120 is the first of my 3 Triumphs that I haven't felt the need to "adjust" for comfort, it's been a real pleasure right outta the box, both my previous ones needed shortish bar risers and other mods to make them more comfy so I understand how sapping discomfort on a bike can be. I hope you find something suitable so you can get the maximum enjoyment outta your Bonnie (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would suggest a change of handlebars.

You don't need them up and back. When you grip the stock bars you are rotating your elbows and shoulders to fit the bars, i.e. almost 90' to the direction you are facing when sitting on the bike. If you stand and let your arms fall to your sides, you will notice that your fists, when lightly clenched, are angled about 30' inward to the front. That is the angle you need for the bars to be at.

So the bars should be a little wider, maybe a little higher, with the grips angled a little more -'V' shaped towards the front of the bike. You know - cruiser bars. Perhaps like the Bobber?

And no, the barrel shaped grips are not compatible with the heated grips. At least they aren't on my '20 T120.

My $.02 FWIW.

Cheers!

G
Interesting observation....the stock bars are maybe 15 degrees off from where my hands naturally fall, but they put me in a nice 'ready' riding position, which I like. You might be right that for more comfort what is really needed is a change in bar geometry (which is something I started considering at the end of last season), but the idea of putting 'cruiser' bars on this bike just seems wrong, especially since I don't really cruise! I'm sure there are plenty of options available that are not quite all the way to cruiser.....time for a little more research, I guess.
What is difficult, of course, is that each idea or suggestion requires not only the initial out of pocket cost, but then time to install, and then even more time to get enough significant test riding in to see if it even makes a difference. I realize this is basically what it takes, which is why I asked to hear more about what worked for others in an effort to cut down the experiment time/cost, but as someone else mentions, it is a very personal thing. What works for one 6' 1" individual, may not work for the next 6' 1" individual, and so on. I'm going to look at the bars and general riding positions of some of my other bikes, and compare those to the T120 and see what I find.
I really want to solve this, as I love the bike otherwise.
ECJ
 

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2018 Triumph T120 2020 BMW R1250R
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Hi ECJ,

I have a pair of JBQ risers (he's the member who made them) that I'm not using. They were on my T120 and are 7/8" high. I will send them to you. See if they work for you. If they do, you can send me what you think they're worth to you. If they don't work, send them back. Think I paid around 45 bucks. They are in need of some paint, as they're chipped in a few places.

Sound fair? PM me your address if you want to try them...
 
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