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I recently picked up a '68 t100r and it's mostly been riding on back roads and around city streets. I make around a 100 mile round trip drive a few times a month and was wondering if the bike could handle the 60 to 75 mph highway speeds?
 

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Welcome to this forum. Back when these bikes were new, they were used on those sort of rides. Bikes back then were not usually ridden for sustained highish cruising speeds. I would think a 65mph would be the best for this type of bike. The 100 mile journey would not be a major problem though, but these old bikes need more attention than modern bikes. Try doing the journies a few times and a suitable speed might come naturally after a while, the constant buzz might irritate or even the wind noise. I rarely keep at high speed for long distance on old bikes that have no wind deflectors.
In your profile, it would be useful if you show your location in the World so others might advise.
Cheers, enjoy the ride.
 

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A number of factors combine to make my standard T100R a pretty poor highway bike if I’m perfectly honest. With the US wide handlebars and forward footpeg position I’m just a parachute and even at 60mph (approx 4500rpm) this becomes tiring quickly. The loud exhaust which is absolute music to my ears around town becomes an annoying drone at that speed…and I wear earplugs. I have confidence in the reliability of the bike but it’s just not in its nature to be ridden at sustained higher speed.

Having said that whilst our overall gearbox ratios are the same mine has 18/46 gearbox/rear wheel sprockets, a 1968 T100R should have a 19/46 combination according to my parts book and that’ll help on highways. It’s the first mod I’ll be doing if/when I need to take the primary drive apart.

As Rambo says try it out and have fun doing it.
 

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Along with Rambo's and Rusty's good points keep in mind all "highways" are not equal. The highway that cuts through our city is the busiest stretch of road in North America. All our bikes, from 500 to 750's, quickly become undersized and ill equipped mopeds/scooters on that stretch. I avoid riding on it as much as possible despite having ridden along it daily with my bike in the 70's. For me, no amount of wistful sentimental nostalgia will ever override the fact that it is simply not suitable to ride a vintage Triumph motorcycle on that stretch of highway today. So...what kind of highway are you thinking about?
 

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Hi there!
As Rusty says, normally 60mph can be a tiring buzz at 4500 rpm. I have changed the gearing on my T100T to be 19/43 gearbox/rear sprocket (QD wheel on mine) so changed the factory 46T rear for a 43T new sprocket/brake drum. This gives a much more pleasant 3900 rpm at 60 mph highway cruising but is still responsive and will pull well in top gear from about 30mph. 70mph is then about 4600 rpm, not particularly buzzy, on mine at least, but the wind buffeting gets very annoying with the standard UK bars and footrest positions.
Enjoy your machine! They are a great lightweight model - that's factor is especially useful when you get a bit older like me!
 

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Triumph triple - disc-brake T150V or T160 - and, as the late Jack Wilson said, "Ride it like you stole it." :D

Regards,
Adam on this forum has a nice triple too. I would be surprised if he didn't agree with me about this particular stretch of highway (401 through Toronto). Too busy. Too many kooks on the road at one time in one place. Most other highways though, letting out the horses of a nicely kept T150V, I must admit, is a beautiful and necessary thing. :cool:
 

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Yes, but the main problem with 401 ( and Gardiner ) during a day is amount of traffic which clogs it completely so everybody moves at the snail pace which is not suitable for our old, air cooled bikes.
I don't have a problem with 427 ( being much wider now ) or 407 ( other than paying for it ):).
My friend Steve on his very able 69 TR6 keeps with me no problem at 120 kph (75 mph ) and many times we rode quite briskly together ( 120 - 140 kph ) for 100 - 150 miles trips using north/west of Toronto back roads or 401 around Hamilton.
Unfortunately I don't have any experience with T100 Triumphs.
 

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Keep in mind that the T100R is really not a very large bike and it's quite light. Times I've ridden mine on the "super slab" I found the buffeting from passing traffic to be a little unnerving. Also keep in mind that with the crummy fuels available today you need to be on the lookout for any sign of detonation since running at 70 mph plus would be considered high speed and high load operation for that engine. It wouldn't take too long to trash your engine if there's any detonation going on and you might not hear it at those speeds with the wind and traffic noise. Personally I wouldn't do it.
 

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We don't have "no lane splitting" laws in the uk.
If cars aren't moving, just pass them.
We have them in Ontario, other than that you don't have any space for passing.
6 lines of cars and trucks going slowly bumper to bumper as far as you can see.
 

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1967 Daytona T100R on the Highway

:smile2: In my younger days I routinely rode my new 1967 Daytona between NAS North Island and NAS Lemoore, 324 Miles or 522 Km in a little over five hours. California Interstate I-5 ana I-15 were primarily traveled at 70 mph speeds. Vibration and wind were issues in the mountains, plus foot pegs, nuts and bolts were left along the route. An engine overhaul at 11,000 miles showed overheated pistons, however, no damage was done to the 500cc. engine.

Middle years brought a 1970 BMW R75/5 "boxer" (vibration) and a 1988 K100RS ABS "brick" (no-vibration) motorad. The R75 would cruise all day at 80 mph on the Autobahn. The K100RS would cruise 600 miles a day at high speeds, especially when a "chip" removed the 155 mph speed limit set by the factory. Cruising Ontario Highway 402, at triple figure speeds, was accomplished with no effort riding on the K-bike.

:motorbike2Later years brought a 2000 Ducati 996S "Superbike." A great track and short trip ride. Lighter than the T100R, it is much faster, more agile and hugs the road with the full Öhlins, non-electronic, suspension. There are no limits on the 197+mph advertised top speed. "Life begins at 140," the wind is quiet, like flying a jet aircraft.

Currently, I will still take the original "Daytona" on longer trips. Modern electronic ignition, 12v electrical system and adhesives have improved the Triumph's reliability. The 500cc engine has proven it can do 500 miles a day at the Daytona International Speedway! 0:)
 

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I have to admit I am surprised by some of these responses. No disrespect intended in what i am about to say. There is nothing wrong with riding your T100R the way you describe at all. I have a 1967 T100R, and I routinely ride as described. It is more than capable. All this talk about vibration and wind buffeting is non sense. I own 54 motorcycles and only one of them has a windshield. I hate windshields, might as well be in a car. Vibration - part of the fun and experience of owning a vintage motorcycle. Just goes to show that everyone has an opinion. Original poster didn't ask about comfort as much as he asked about can the bike do it. YES, the bike can do it. Whether or not he can is up to him.

Rob
 

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Triumph triple - disc-brake T150V or T160 - and, as the late Jack Wilson said, "Ride it like you stole it." :D

Regards,
Right on, Stuart - on a triple, 70mph is just idling.......and she's begging for more........

But on a 500, as everyone has said, without higher gearing, she's not comfy at 65 except for short periods, and even then seems wound about as tight as she wants to go. I've had mine above 75, but it was not a comfortable speed at all. But I'm leaving my '71 T100C as she is since I have the Trident and Bonnie for all day at highway speeds.......she's so peppy and light for riding 55 and below.....a special joy.........

GN
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Vibration - part of the fun and experience of owning a vintage motorcycle.
My old bike was a harley XLCH so I'm more than used to the vibrations and random quarks. I'm supposed to pick it up this weekend I might take it out on the I 5 if it's nice.
 

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If it has been used a lot at lower speeds recently, i would check all fixings before setting of on a 75mph ride. It might come back a little lighter if not checked.
 

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Have to agree with Mach1970 and Stuart. Used to ride my '70 Daytona across three states and back on the weekend (long trip, but a nice girlfriend on the far end...oh, to be young and dumb again). I scabbed on higher bars and footpegs with a sleeping bag to lean on. Fourteen hours over and 12 back, depending on weather. That bike would run 60-70 all day, all two lane, and across the Rockies. Most cars I ever passed in one shot was on Lolo pass, heading west, 13 cars, one shot in the twisties...no intersecting roads and from the top you could see at least a mile. In answer to the question, the bike will handle it fine if it is kept up. And for those that consider old equipment unreliable, my normal ride is a 1974 shovel that I don't hesitate to take as far as I want (it is good for 900 mile days...I'm the one that's wearing down). Same with my '73 850 Norton, it will run as long as I want to ride...those bikes will still be running long after I'm gone as long as they are kept up. So get on the bike, crank it up and enjoy life.
 
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