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I have a "new" 1968 T100R Daytona. It is exceptionally nice and all original/unmolested with the exception of Boyer ignition. I am in the process of changing all the fluids and I also bought a shop manual. In one section of the manual it says to use 20 wt oil in the gear box, and in another it says to use 80-90 wt Hypo gear lube. I'm confused! I know I'm to fill until it comes out the overflow, but, does anyone know:

1 About how much lube will the transmission hold?, and
2. Is 20 wt oil or 80-90 wt gear lube the right stuff?

Thanks
 

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I have the blue binder factory manual for 4 models the t100 tiger being one of them. In one spot it says SAE30 but in the charts with recommended oils for both UK and Overseas they call for SAE50 motor oil. I am running SAE50 in my 70 Bonneville and quite like it. Early Brit machines(bikes and cars) called for engine oil in the trans. You will find others that say run a hypoid gear oil 70-90 wt. I say try both and see which you prefer. My experience with the cars was they shift better with a lighter lubricant.
 

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hi!

i have a 69 T100R myself. Daytonas were beauts.

basic gearbox lube is 50 weight. Usually the bottom plug on the tranny is a two in one deal. the little easy to break one on the bottom is a level plug. the bigger one IT screws onto is the drain plug. take the big plug with the little one off at the same time, drain all the old goop, check for shrapnel and broken bits and if you're OK there put the big plug back in after GENTLY taking the level plug out and checking your washer/oil gaskets. with the level plug off AND a drain pan under,block the bike fairly level so it won't tip overand fill through the filler hole which is by where the clutch cable goes into the gearbox on the top till it starts to come out the level tube hole, cap it GENTLY but firmly and bob's yer uncle! 2/3 pint 375 cc's

the Primary case Lube is 300 cc's of 20 weight oil. the drain plug is also where you adjust the primary chain (don't adjust it too tight, they like a little play ). theres an oil level plug forward of the drain plug and you can fill till it comes out there if you want to instead of measuring 300 cc's out.

but rather than getting into details, I'll turn you on to where to get an online free workshop manual with ALL the specs in it.

(theres pix of all the above in the PDF maual download)

http://www.classicbike.biz/Triumph/Repair/Repair.htm

might as well download your year and model eh?



Post some pix of you and yer ride for the fun of it

happy trails!
 

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In my T100, I run 80/90 gear oil. They don't seem to be too picky. If I hadn't literally replaced the gear oil 2 days ago, I would consider running straight 50 in it for a bit just to try it out. However, it seems to like the gear oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had already bought a jug of gear lube and that's what I'll use. Thanks for all the input.
 

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I think the problem we have here is in translation. Using the term 'Transmission' is really from Autos. The gearbox needs Gearbox oil, back when it was made this would be straight 50 grade EP oils. The primary chaincase is just that, it needs alight oil, to lubricate the clutch hub bearing and chain. originally they would recommend straight 20 grade.
It may be possible to use a multigrade oil up to nn/90 for teh gearbox, and 20/50 or even 15/40 for the chaincase if you need to use multigrades due to availability
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That makes sense.

The gear box now has 80-90 wt and the primary and engine have 15-40 Shell Rotella. I've used Rotella for years in any situation where I don't think Mobil 1 is appropriate. I've had good service from it.

I think the improvements in lubricants over the last 40 years makes any modern stuff better than whatever they were using back in 1968.
 

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That makes sense.

The gear box now has 80-90 wt and the primary and engine have 15-40 Shell Rotella. I've used Rotella for years in any situation where I don't think Mobil 1 is appropriate. I've had good service from it.

I think the improvements in lubricants over the last 40 years makes any modern stuff better than whatever they were using back in 1968.
For your engine unless it is cold where you are you are better off using an SG only rated 20/50 ( SH/SL at a push) Try Harley V twin oil, probably the easiest for you to get. certainly dont use the 40 grade above 75/80F
 

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I run 80w-90 (I think?? maybe 75w90??) can't remember, but I run Lucas brand with 20% lucas oil stabilizer. Good mix indeed, very smooth operation. I usually only have to change this once a year.
 

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I got chatted up by a well oiled tranny in the pub last Saturday night!:D
I don't even want to know how you determined it was well oiled.:surprise:

Sorry, I realize this is an old post, was researching something else and came upon this post and just had to comment.
 

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I too hope that by "well oiled" - he is refering to the Brit expression for being relaxed due to large amounts of alcohol - if not - i dont wish to know how he knows either
 

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I too hope that by "well oiled" - he is refering to the Brit expression for being relaxed due to large amounts of alcohol - if not - i dont wish to know how he knows either
Lost in translation applies here. You Brits have some strange colloquialisms.
 

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Hi,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum. :)

1967 T100 Daytona 500
(y)

50 SAE by Rock Oil, Warrington UK. For both primary drive and gearbox.
Ummm ... why?

Over half-a-century ago, your bike's maker (defunct nearly forty years ago) recommended "50 SAE" engine oil in the gearbox only.

Triumph recommended much lighter 20 "SAE" in the primary, because it's for lubricating the primary chain when its bottom run dips in the oil; "50 SAE" is too thick to do this (which is why Triumph didn't recommend it).

Nevertheless, as I say, we're talking recommendations over half-a-century old. Some years earlier, Triumph stopped recommending acetylene for the lights because reliable electric lamps were available. A bit before that, Triumph stopped using hot-tube ignition because HT coils and spark plugs were more reliable. ;)

Similarly, only a few years after they made your bike, without any major design or mechanical changes to the gearbox, Triumph recommended SAE EP90 proper gearbox oil in the gearbox - "EP" indicates Extreme Pressure additives, that engine oil doesn't have but specifically gearbox oil does.

Aside, at the same time, also without any major design or mechanical changes to the engine, Triumph changed to recommending SAE 20W50 multigrade engine oil. Even at the time, multigrades had been around for over twenty years and in common usage world-wide for over ten years, so Triumph was hardly at the technical bleeding edge.

One reason you had to buy "50 SAE" from half-a-planet away might be no-one in NZ is daft enough to waste money on it? But you can buy EP90 and 20W50 easily? ;)

Finally here, I sincerely hope you aren't also using the tyre pressures Triumph recommended 53 years ago? You'll find the handling on any modern tyres very weird, to the point of being dangerous. :(

Hth.

Regards,
 

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I would expect the clutch to slip and drag (worse than usual), in “straight 50” oil.

I have seen Castrol GP50 apparently fail to travel from the tank to the oil pump on a cold, not freezing, morning. The oil pressure fell to nothing as revs increased.
 
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