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Discussion Starter #1
Folks, I could use some help. I've been trying to figure out what I need to do to improve the cornering on my 2013 T100 and I'm at a loss. I'll readily admit that I'm a noob when it comes to this, so if I'm missing the obvious, please let me know. Here's the situation:

When I attempt moderately hard cornering (almost peg scraping, speeds 35+), the rear end of the bike feels like it's trying to stand up. It's not sliding out from under me, at least I don't think that's what's happening. It will just feel like it suddenly catches and want to go upright. It's a rhythmic feel to it as well, so the longer the curve, the more times it will happen. Normal cornering is no problem, it's only when I'm trying to push it a bit.

I have TEC adjustable shocks. I originally set them up by measuring the sag, but have since increased the preload because I thought they might be too soft. I've also adjusted the rebound. I have room to adjust both preload and rebound more, but the adjustments so far have not really resulted in any improvement. It may have SLIGHTLY improved with additional preload, but not much.

The tires are the Kenda Cruisers that I got with the bike when I bought it last spring. I've put nearly 7000 miles on them. They still have life left in them, though I am looking at replacements. I've checked inflation and I've tested it using spot on pressure levels, slightly underinflated, and slightly overinflated. BTW, I'm 5'9" and 240 lbs fully geared up. I've not notice much in the way of difference at any inflation levels. Currently, the tires are at the recommended pressures.

Where should I look next? Is there anything I can do with what I currently have to improve the cornering? It's not that the bike is unrideable, but there are times where I'd like to get a little more spirited with it, but that wallow is unsettling.
 

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Usually it's the suspension. Tire pressure comes into play as well. Are the springs rated for your riding weight? What is the rear sag set at(rider sag)? Did it always do this with the shocks and tires when new? Maybe the tires have squared off and need replacing. Rebound can be too light and cause wallowing. At your weight maybe a higher tire pressure although you stated you tried that. To be honest, you might need to change one aspect at a time to narrow the issue down or find the solution. The front end also has to be sorted out as well especially being in balance with the rear. Ride height also needs to be looked at, possibly. Too low in the rear can cause issues. Slower steering and a tendency not to want to lean over as well.
 

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My Dad has a 2007 T-100. A few years ago he and I met up at Watkins Glen for some camping and riding, on my 2008. Now I have scrambler-length shocks and oversized tires, the handling is quite a bit different that stock. But when took his bike for a ride, I was shocked at how hard the thing was to turn. Just like you describe, damn thing just wanted to stand up, wouldn't stay in a lean. I guess not exactly what you describe, because this was at all speeds.

His tires were original, so like 10 years old. We realized he had a significant split starting on the front tire. They were trash.

He put fresh rubber on the bike, and problem solved! Still turns different from mine, but turns just fine for what it is.

So, just one story. Still doesn't make sense to me how tires could have such a big effect. But ... might be worth swapping yours out early and seeing how that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Felony,
I think I set the sag properly originally; measured the unsprung sag, then the sag with just the bike, and then sag with my weight and adjusted to around 40mm. At least that's where I started initially. There was actually very little preload adjustment needed. Since, I've added preload and made the rear end much stiffer.

The front end has progressive springs in it. I did lower the rear end some when I went to the new TEC shocks. They come with removeable spacers. I took those out which dropped the rear end about an inch/25mm. I adjusted the spacers in the front end accordingly to try to match. I suppose I could put the spacers back into the rear.
 

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Start at the bottom and work your way up . Tyres are they fitted correctly , seated properly on the rim , rotation direction right . Wheels straight , in line . All bearings tip top no play where there shouldn't be any ( wheel , swing arm , steering ) .
 

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You said that you have Tec shocks, well I've read some bad things about them. So do a search in this forum and you'll see where they break and all kinds of nasty stuff. But a lot of people like them !!!!!
 

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Folks, I could use some help.
Am like you... You might face the same issue like me, mine 2012 model, sag, tire pressure, change back to ori shock, does not work.

If yours is spokes, try put it up center stand, than start engine and let the tire run, check if your tire is woobble or perfect. Mine look from left or right side of bike can see it goes up and down, culprit is to adjust the spokes tension(truing). Am also a noob learning, no harm to check this simple test.
 

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With 7000 miles on those tires, I wouldn't be surprised if they've begun to square off (profile of the tire becoming flat in the middle). Bikes can feel like they suddenly want to rise or drop as they lean over that squared off edge. Time for new tires?
 

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As your tyres are old and need to be replaced start there first, new tyres will change the feel of your ride by a large degree, especially if you go for a decent brand of road tyre. If you buy a good sticky road tyre by a popular brand they may not last 7,000 miles, but tyres are the most important part on any motorcycle and for your own safety should be the stickiest you can get for your bike.

In my mind, I don't want a tyre that lasts for over 7,000 miles as by definition it's too hard and doesn't give the adhesion required for modern riding. A hard long lasting tyre is good for the wallet, but in certain possible situations, bad for your health.
 

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Pieman is right about addressing the tires first.
Since you are about ready for tires anyway, start there first.
Do some extensive research on what the best tires may be for your specific application.
There's LOTS of tires available and there can be significant differences on how they affect the bikes handling. If the new tires help but don't completely solve the problem then do the other mods as being suggested. Good luck, you may need a little.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Pieman is right about addressing the tires first.
Since you are about ready for tires anyway, start there first.
Do some extensive research on what the best tires may be for your specific application.
There's LOTS of tires available and there can be significant differences on how they affect the bikes handling. If the new tires help but don't completely solve the problem then do the other mods as being suggested. Good luck, you may need a little.
Tires were on the agenda this spring, once riding season come back around. I'm planning on going with Avon Roadriders.

The other area that I think I need to look at is the geometry changes that I made by lowering the rear end. It's something that I had frankly forgotten about as to how it could affect the handling. I may need to either put the spacers back into the rear or shorten the front spacers a bit more.
 

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My guess is it is your tires, and if you don't take this very seriously and get rid of them - they will get rid of you! I never wait for tire replacement. There have been years I put tires on my credit card. I buy them as my rear tire starts to wear down. Usually I will feel a couple of skips and uneven corners on the old tires. That's your warning - replace the tires. Don't wait.
 

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Tires were on the agenda this spring, once riding season come back around. I'm planning on going with Avon Roadriders.

The other area that I think I need to look at is the geometry changes that I made by lowering the rear end. It's something that I had frankly forgotten about as to how it could affect the handling. I may need to either put the spacers back into the rear or shorten the front spacers a bit more.
Try the roadriders, they do last a long time (I have about 10k on my current set), but I have pushed them to the limits of the bike and they handle quite well and are sticky for what you are buying. I actually have to replace the feelers on the pegs (triumph calls them a peg, "bank angle"), I have no warning anymore before the silencers scrape. Evidently Triumphs version aren't warning me of the maximum angle. :) The roadriders are much better than the OEM metzler that came with the bike.

When the bike wants to stand through a corner, are you feeling anything in the chassis (bumps in the road, vibrations or the like)? And this may be a stupid question, but what is your body position when you feel the rear end want to stand up -- could you be unconsciously changing the line in the corner? To me, something rhythmic only through a corner would be a drive line issue, not a suspension or tire one. Unless it only happens in one direction?
 

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The other area that I think I need to look at is the geometry changes that I made by lowering the rear end. It's something that I had frankly forgotten about as to how it could affect the handling. I may need to either put the spacers back into the rear or shorten the front spacers a bit more.
From what I understand the TEC shocks with the spacers are Thruxton length, without spacers they are original T100 length. So you haven't made a change from original removing the spacers. Do not lower the front by shortening the spring spacer, that will affect rider sag. If you want to lower the front , loosen the triple tree clamps and slide the fork tubes up as much as 16mm ( 5/8'').
Try tightening up the rebound on the shocks, if adjustable, lean forward and in, in a turn. Do you have a rack or extra weight on the rear? Having said all that, my two bikes with stock suspension do that, weaving, but only when going too fast on longer sweepers but not at lo speeds as you describe. Only at 70 to 80 MPH. I try not to do that so much.

good luck
 

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I have had the same thing and i am pretty sure it is not tire related. To me it feels like too much play in the Swing Arm so i bought a pair of these. I have not been bothered to pull the Swing Arm out yet to see if they have made a difference so i am not much help there i am afraid. Maybe someone else on this forum has.?
th.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Try the roadriders, they do last a long time (I have about 10k on my current set), but I have pushed them to the limits of the bike and they handle quite well and are sticky for what you are buying. I actually have to replace the feelers on the pegs (triumph calls them a peg, "bank angle"), I have no warning anymore before the silencers scrape. Evidently Triumphs version aren't warning me of the maximum angle. :) The roadriders are much better than the OEM metzler that came with the bike.

When the bike wants to stand through a corner, are you feeling anything in the chassis (bumps in the road, vibrations or the like)? And this may be a stupid question, but what is your body position when you feel the rear end want to stand up -- could you be unconsciously changing the line in the corner? To me, something rhythmic only through a corner would be a drive line issue, not a suspension or tire one. Unless it only happens in one direction?
RoadRiders are coming soon.

I definitely feel the road. I'm not disconnected as in the suspension is too soft. If anything now that I've adjusted the preload, it's a bit stiff.

Good question about body position. The first time I really noticed this, I was on a reducing radius corner on an off ramp, just riding normally, not really hanging off the bike. However, due the reducing radius, I was pushing the lean angle. Since, whenever I've been testing the bike, I've been using a couple of local streets that have some fun tight 'S' curves. On these test rides, I do push it and hang a bit off the bike and scrape the pegs. I ride those curves in both directions, out and back, and it happens regardless of the direction of the curve.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
From what I understand the TEC shocks with the spacers are Thruxton length, without spacers they are original T100 length. So you haven't made a change from original removing the spacers. Do not lower the front by shortening the spring spacer, that will affect rider sag. If you want to lower the front , loosen the triple tree clamps and slide the fork tubes up as much as 16mm ( 5/8'').
Try tightening up the rebound on the shocks, if adjustable, lean forward and in, in a turn. Do you have a rack or extra weight on the rear? Having said all that, my two bikes with stock suspension do that, weaving, but only when going too fast on longer sweepers but not at lo speeds as you describe. Only at 70 to 80 MPH. I try not to do that so much.

good luck
No, the TEC's that I bought were T100 length shocks. I think that's a 340mm eye to eye. There is a spacer though that is removable to reduce the length of the shock by 25mm. If you go to their website, you can see it on their adjustable alloy shocks. I was actually given advice here on shortening the front spacers. I ended up making new spacers out of 1" PVC. I may try putting those spacers back in on the rears and see how that performs.
 
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