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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I'm new to this great forum and a little overwhelmed with all the info. I'm looking into buying a T100 Daytona (late 60s or early 70s) and was wondering whether you could pinpoint me to info on which model to get / or whether there're big differences btw them. More generally, I'd be most grateful for advice on weak spots / things to look out for when buying this bike, and also info on engine/frame numbers in order to verify the year of construction.

Many thanks and regards from down under (Sydney)
Chris
 

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Welcome!

There's a lot of personal preference that will appear in replies to as open-ened a question as yours.

It's all down to which specific examples you have to choose from. One may be a numbers-matching original but scruffy one, and anothr might be a freshly overhauled and painted but un-original and/or non-matching bike.

General condition, completeness, paperwork and test ride are probably the most important points to consider. If the bike isn't running or can't be test ridden, you are at a distinct disadvantage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for that first reply. Ok, let me a bit more specific:

- are there major differences btw the early models (67-69) and the later models 70-73?

- I have found a 67 model which sounds interesting. Does anyone know the series numbers for this year?

- Colour is a kind of light green, what were the original colours / colour codes?

- and finally, and more generally, how is the spare parts situation worldwide for the t100daytona?

as you can see, my preferece is the original / unmolested model...this is going to be my first vintage bike, but from my experience with vintage cars, the originals were always the better choice.

thanks a lot,
cheers
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
great, thanks for the VIN number reference, Mikey, I was just writing the other post when you sent it.
 

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Tons of parts available.
The later models have the larger front brake...and it works REALLY well.
 

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67 - 74 are very similar bikes. (the frame that continued until the end of the 500 in 74 was introduced in 67) Of that year range, if I had to be forced to say which I think is the 'best' (which is purely a matter of opinion) I would say 1969.

The '69 engine has all of the advantages of the '70 and later being mainly the bearing on both ends of the crank (plus individually adjustable points and several other minor things) but does not yet share oil between primary and crankcase.

The brakes had already been upgraded to the stout 8" (if you get a true Daytona / T100R) twin leading shoe which outperforms early disc brakes. They hadn't yet stuck the ugly turn signals on the bike. and in '71, they shortened the rear fender, which I think looks odd on the bike.
 

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also in 69 they went to a ball bearing main on the timing side . previously it was a bronze bush . however i wouldn't let that keep me from buying a 68 or earlier . the tls brake on the later models is a big improvement though . i'm fitting one to my 67 .
 

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Chrismic,

I am building a 69 T100R and have not had any problems finding parts. I've bought some on ebay and I have had Bob of B & R cycles supply some machine work and parts as well.

I had a 71 Bonneville before and it was a fun fast bike but I really like the size and weight of the T100.

"Original" is nice but there are many improvements that can make these old Brit bikes better in some ways, just like Woody is doing with his 67 brakes.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
one more question: none (not even the last models) of the t100 daytonas have indicators, right?

have people considered fitting them? or how do you guys deal with that? Thing is, there are a lots of round-abouts and reckless car drivers in Australia, and while design-wise indicators may be a bad option, I think they's enhance safety considerably...

thanks
Chris
 

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I don't know with any degree of certainty how they were shipped elsewhere, but as of 1971 the US DOT mandated that all motorcycles sold new must be fitted with turn signal indicators. All motorcycles sold on this continent had them. It was the only major difference between the 70 and 71 model 500s. Front ones were stalk mounted through holes in the fork ears and the rears were stalk mounted through holes in a 'gusset' plate on the rear fender stay / grab rail.
 

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...and in terms of bringing pleasure, I just love cruising around the city on my '67, despite having to use both front and rear brakes to stop somewhat effectively. I did find that riding this bike on a freeway is not the most satisfying experience; but taking it around town or on a not-too-aggressive ride in the mountain twisties is a lot of fun. As previously mentioned, the size and weight of the T100R is a big plus. I would recommend the bike highly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
many thanks for the feedback, I think I might just get the 67 Daytona then....alternatively there's a Dec 71 T120V Bonneville for sale for the same price, but somehow I prefer the Daytona.
will keep you posted
chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
hi guys, ok, some more info on the bike. Seller's claiming it's a 1967 model, and I checked engine/frame win, T100RH59166 which suggests an early 1968 bike if I'm not mistaken, but I guess this counts as the 1967 model.

Bike seems to be in ok condition, however, I'm a bit concerned about the colour:as you can see it's a turquoise green(one clour). Seller says he bought it like that...but my research suggests that the 1967 was pacific blue / white. Do you know whether the 1967 model came in any other colour?

Finally, one thing I'm really concerned about, the bike has only one carb....the T100Daytona should have two, right? Seems to be running fine with one...any views on that?

cheers
C.
 

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That's a '68. Serial number comes back to '68 AND the '67 model had its key in the side cover. '68 T100 should be Aquamarine (turquoise).

It's pretty common to find Triumphs that were originally dual carb that have been converted to single. The performance loss is negligible and you don't have to tune the dual carbs. Converting back is simple, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
T120rv

Hi guys,

thanks again for the advice on the T100Daytona....I ended up not getting it, but got the T120RV Bonnie instead - it somehow all felt right with the Bonnie. As you can imagine I'm super excited. This is my first bike project, and so I probably have thousands of questions but dont want to spam you straight away.

One thing that I'm certainly trying to find out is the bike's history. Its (matching) VIN is XG42820 which appears to be Dec 71 if I'm not mistaken. I bought the bike off an old gentleman who bought it from a Sydney dealer 13 or so years ago when it received a (powder-coated) paint job in apparentl original colours . The dealer allegedly imported it from the US....this is where the story ends. I'd be grateful for any hints on how to trace the history further.

As to condition, as far as I can tell (from my experience with vintage cars), the bike is in ok condition (then again I'm probably not able to give a proper judgment). 13k miles in the clock (no idea whether genuine), a little surface rust on the exhausts and indicators. Some work seems to have been done (new rear shocks - not genuine). The bike is certainly not a shiner - but I prefer kind of honest vehicles....One thing that seems to need urgent attention is the front brake, which is really weak. Is this model known for front break problems?

Also, my 70s manual states that the gas tap on the left is the reserve. On my bike it's the right tap which has the R stamped on it. Does this mechanism work generally and what happens when I keep both taps open?

And finally, and sorry for a perhaps v dumb question, what kind of petrol does it need? ie do I have to add lead additives or is it sufficient to use high-octan (98) fuel?

Cheers
Chris
 

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Built December 71, makes it a '72 model Bonneville. Also, the "V" in the model name means it's a 5 speed. As far as the front brake goes, the conical hub drum front brake is a known weak brake. However, it should be able to stop the bike safely. To get the most out of that brake, use the services of Vintage Brake. You should be just fine running quality high octane fuel.
 
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