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I was doing a little research to improve the braking of my T100, other than new pads. I already have the pads. I just need to install them, looks like a good project for this coming weekend. But back to my question.

Has anyone replaced there Bonnie/T100 front brake rotor with the Thruxton front rotor. The Bonnie is 310 mm and the Thrux is 320 mm ? If you did it, other than getting the Thrux rotor what else was needed and where you able to feel any difference in the stopping of your Bonnie ? And was it worth the effort and or money ?
 

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Spend your money on a floater, then you don't need to worry about changing anything else.
 

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Am I the only one who can lock up the front break on his Bonnie with one finger? I guess shoeing horses thirty years ago is still good for something.
 

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Get an EBC floating disc, HH pads to go with it , SS lines and some super Motul 600 brake fluid.
That should put a stop to the bike!

I also put the SS line on the rear, bled the fluid and replaced with 600 , and put a set of EBC HH pads back there. She really stops pretty good!

[ This message was edited by: HiVel on 2007-03-08 07:29 ]
 

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On 2007-03-07 19:28, Jimbonnie wrote:
Am I the only one who can lock up the front break on his Bonnie with one finger? I guess shoeing horses thirty years ago is still good for something.
I bet you are a power nose picker too!!
 

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"I bet you are a power nose picker too!!"

Actually, since my wife got my that electric nose hair trimmer I no longer pick my nose at all. It took about a week of grinding, and I ruined two blades, but after I got through the dense underbrush that was my nose hairs and the dried and compacted***** mass that glued those hairs into something resembling brown and green reinforced concrete, I no longer have to pick my nose.

But thanks for the thought.


ps - the binary censors don't like the word b u g g e r. Probably because it means **** in English English.

[ This message was edited by: Jimbonnie on 2007-03-08 09:38 ]
 

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On 2007-03-07 14:13, wenzel850 wrote:

...Has anyone replaced there Bonnie/T100 front brake rotor with the Thruxton front rotor. The Bonnie is 310 mm and the Thrux is 320 mm ? If you did it, other than getting the Thrux rotor what else was needed and where you able to feel any difference in the stopping of your Bonnie ? And was it worth the effort and or money ?
The January issue of Motorcycle Consumer News has a summary of test results of just about all recent motorcycles. The test results for "Braking 60-0 mph, ft" shows 115.0 feet for the Bonneville and 133.8 feet for the Thruxton. Changing to the Thruxton brakes probably isn't worth it.
 

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I think MCN is like Consumer Reports...so convinced of their own objectivity that they can't give an unbiased review.
 

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"The January issue of Motorcycle Consumer News has a summary of test results of just about all recent motorcycles. The test results for "Braking 60-0 mph, ft" shows 115.0 feet for the Bonneville and 133.8 feet for the Thruxton. Changing to the Thruxton brakes probably isn't worth it."

That's a big difference. I'll bet it's got much more to do with the different weight distribution of the two bikes under maximum braking than anything else.

If you can lock up the brakes with little effort there's no sense in adding the weight of a second caliper and rotor unless you're concerned with heat induced fade, though that's rarely a problem on the street. (pauses here to pick his nose with his ultra-strong braking finger) The advantages of a single brake and rotor are improved handing and a better ride because of the reduced unsprung weight.



[ This message was edited by: Jimbonnie on 2007-03-08 16:37 ]
 

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There was an episode of "That 70s Show "where Fez (?) is with a girl and she says, "Oh Fez, your hand is so STRONG!" then pauses a moment before asking, quizzically, "Why is your right hand so much stronger than your left?"

Silly me, I never noticed that he rode a motorcycle on the show. BTW, Jim, how long have you been wearing glasses?

Now, all kidding aside, I always use both brakes on my Thrux when there is significant braking needed. I upgraded from the stockers to an EBC organic pad of some type--not sure it has more stopping power, but it has muuuuuch better feel because of the softer compound. The brake no longer has the wooden on/off feel. It's one of my favorite upgrades, in fact.

Of course, whatever you do, remember that they mean it when they say to allow extra stopping distance till your new brakes bed in. I had a scare or two right after the pad swap. Finally, if you wanna cross-reference parts, its worthwhile to know that the front brake on a Thruxton takes the same pad as a Honda Pacific Coast so you can find it in a parts list that is weak on Triumph listings.
 

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One thing I don't like about the stock pads is that they seem very hard on the rotors. I don't ride in the rain, and so I don't need metal in my pads, so can anyone recommend a set of pads that is easier on the rotors? I'd rather they become polished than scored and worn out after a few tens of thousands of miles. Suggestions?

I've been wearing glasses ever since Mr. J....remainder deleted to protect the innocent young minds riding our beloved Triumphs....but that quaint British phrase, "He pulls like a school boy" does come to mind.



[ This message was edited by: Jimbonnie on 2007-03-09 10:42 ]
 

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On 2007-03-08 20:03, Jimbonnie wrote:
so can anyone recommend a set of pads that is easier on the rotors? I'd rather they become polished than scored and worn out after a few tens of thousands of miles. Suggestions?
I think the organic EBCs are just what you are looking for.
 

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I use the EBC floating rotor with HH pads. In addition, I carefully bled my brakes to eliminate all possible air in the lines. The combination yielded better feel and greatly reduced lever travel. It seems to stop better, but I think it is due to better control rather than total stopping potential...
 

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When I pick up the 904 soon, it will have new EBC pads, stainless lines and stock everything else. The shorty levers help alot too. Great feel on the front brake.
 

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I use both brakes quite often to stop or slow quickly on my T100-these bikes seem to behave better with a touch of rear brake. I can lock up my rear brake with one toe while wearing my flip flops and this is because I spent many years
picking apples with my feet. While doing this I can also pick my nose with my left index finger which has become very strong from many years of picking my nose.

I find the brakes set up the way I have them very good for my riding style (old and slow).
 
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