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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

A couple of years ago I had my suspensions tuned up by a track-day specialist in Washington, NJ, USA.

Today I find the front of my S3 a little vague and quite hard.

A friend of mine has recently ridden my bike and told me he thought the compression damping for the front was too firm.

So I checked the bike settings for the front: the compression damping is at 2 turns out from the fully screwed in position. This is the standard factory setting according to the owners handbook.

The rebound damping is at only 1 turn out from the fully screwed in position. This is firmer than the firmer setting (1.50) on the owners handbook.

I guess I should go back to the standard setting for the rebound damping (2.00), and go from there...

But I was wondering if any rider out there weighing about 180lbs and riding quite hard sometimes on the road had a suspension setting to advise me?

Thx

Max_NYC now Max_Paris
 

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Given that suspension settings can be quite personal, I have spent the best part of 6 hours last weekend adjusting. I have found so far dropping preload to 2 lines instead of three helped with small bump harshness then, compression 2 and rebound 2 has so far been the best feel. I am 85kg's and 175cm, and like a stiffer set up. I have also upped compression on the rear by .5 of a turn.

Cheers
Simo
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm, I hadn't thought about adjusting the preload since in the owners handbook it always stays on 3 turns out of the fully screwed in position, no matter the type of feeling wanted (standard, softer, firmer).

Correct me if I'm wrong, but 2 turns preload out of the fully screwed in position means more preload and therefore I don't really understand how it can help with small bump harshness..

?
 

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Max, aim of the preload is to get suspension to work in the right range. If you have too little preload for your weight, the suspension will be working at lower end and will bottom out easier (or hit the tighter wound section of the OEM dual rate springs).

Adding preload will reduce suspension sag and give more usable suspension travel.

You should always set the front & rear race sag first, before fiddling with the damping settings. Many good guides on the net for this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
OK I think I got it thanks.

But in Slicks' case, i.e. "dropping preload to 2 lines instead of three helped with small bump harshness " , I think I got confused between the number of lines showing and the number of turns out of the fully screwed in position as it is described in the owners book.

If he dropped preload it means he reduced it for more suspension travel, right? In that case I understand how it helped with small bump harshness. Otherwise, if he set preload to 2 turns instead of 3 out of the fully screwed in (maximum preload?) position, I understand he increased preload for less suspension travel, and in that case I don't understand how it can help with small bump harshness.

But he reduced preload, right?

(Pardon me I'm French!)
 

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if he set preload to 2 turns instead of 3 out of the fully screwed in (maximum preload?) position, I understand he increased preload for less suspension travel, and in that case I don't understand how it can help with small bump harshness.
2 lines showing instead of 3. Means more preload. Which means front of bike is riding higher. Which means there is more usable suspension travel for a heavy rider as forks are not so close to bottoming out.

Just set your bike to have proper measured race sag for your weight. Ignore any preload settings someone else might have as they are wrong for you (unless that someone is your identical twin).
 
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