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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just installed a set of D&D pipes on my bonnie.

I went to unscrew the float bowls to swap the main jets..but one of the float bowl screws are fairly stripped. I'm guessing the previous owner did it, as this is the first time I'm touching the carbs.

The bike is stock, engine wise, aside from the new pipes and an AI removal kit. Ran the bike around the block a few times and she's running pretty well...and sounds great BTW.

It's an 04 790 bonnie. I know I'll have to get the mains swapped out eventually, but how bad will it be to run the bike a few hundred miles without changing out the mains?

Also, any tips on removing stripped screws? Thanks.
 

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i used a set of needle nose vice grips on a stripped carb screw and got it off pretty easily, then i replaced them all with hex head screws.
 

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Surely, and don't call em Shirley, hah...

I was at Sears the other day, looking for a decent torque wrench, and saw stripped screw removal kits. Now, I am sure they have what you need, size wise, but they are expensive. We are lucky enough to have a local Harbor Freight Tools store in Colorado Springs, so I ran down there and picked up a set for 10 bucks, vs 50 at Sears.

They sort of look like drill bits. The goal, get the tip of the bit really to chew into the bolt head allowing you to then bring the bolt out as it's stuck in there.

That being said, you will now have to hit up the schematics at the triumph dealer and buy a replacement bolt. www.bikebandit.com has the schematics for your bike too, and is usually cheaper than local stores, even with shipping.

Regarding the mains not being swapped... I am in the same boat as you, my speedmaster rides and sounds great. No ticking sounds from the valves, no power loss at all. Same work done to my bike. Depending on your riding habits in NYC, I would think you would be fine for now, but have the re jetting set up as your upcoming mod, vice a mod that has to be done right away.
 

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Those OEM screws are soft, if you get a pair of vise grips on the screw head you should be able to crack the screw tension, then you will easily be able to unscrew it. It may be best to take the carbs off to get decent access.
 

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those type of easy-outs have mixed reviews around here. they look like this:



they very fragile and you can easily snap them off in the screw if you wrench on them too hard, and then your in a real jam. i had this happen to me when trying to remove a stripped screw on a vespa carb, but also used them with sucess when removing the threadded portion of a bolt that sits under the triple tree on my thruxton. it holds the handlebar in position, and the head was sheared off after a wreck. now i use a set similar to these:



both methods mentioned above using the EZ-outs require you to center punch and drill a hole down into the screw. time consuming, plus, the set pictured in the second picture is definately a bit more pricey than the $10 set in the first picture.

honestly, i think you could get the screw off pretty easily with some WD-40 and visegrips. and as propforward mentioned, these scres are very soft, so you could even hit one side of the scre with a file to flatten one of the edges lust a hair to allow the visegrips to bite better. and definately take the carbs off to do it. it's much easier in the long run and will make it way easier. this method worked for me.

and referring to the jetting, you really should rejet, especially if your airbox has been removed as well. you probably wont notice anything right away (other than a lot of popping on decel), but those D&D pipes are way more free-flowing than the stock pipes, and you are running lean now, which means you are running hotter, and with the D&D pipes and the airbox removed you are going to be running even hotter still, and you can really damage your engine if you keep running it without jetting it properly.
 

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yes - you absolutely must rejet if you have pulled your airbox off, as you will be dangerously lean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for the tips all. I'll try and grip it with some vise grips and see how that works.

I'm assuming they're not torqued down too tightly?

My airbox is stock, only the pipes are new. I'll be lean, but will it be really bad to run the bike with the stock jets?
 

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yes, you need to rejet. well, i guess you don't need to if you are fine with running excessively lean and eventually burning up your engine. but that's only a decision that you can make.
 

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+1 Dremel

Latigid - I had the exact same problem just yesterday when I did my rejet. The LAST of the 8 float bowl screws stripped. After some tinkering, I took a dremel with a nice sharp rounded saw edge (not sure of the technical name for the attachment) and just layed it directly perpendicular in the middle of the screw head. I let it sit for a minute until I had a nice groove going across the entire head, and just deep enough to work a nice flat head screwdriver. Worked like a charm. And it didn't even break the screw.
Definitely replace with the allen head screws for future endeavors.
 

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choclo - I was in the process of removing my airbox and installing a carb brace, K&Ns, and new SS clamps for the rubbers between the manifold and carbs. Therefore, my carbs were already dislodged. I just simply pulled them out the left side carefully without removing the throttle sensor and turned them on their side with a towel underneath. (learned that from Dinqua's guide to rejetting) Actually much simpler than I thought. Made getting to the jets much easier. But, I've heard of people just removing the float bowls and leaving the carbs in place. I just didn't have the specific tools for that minimal of clearance
 

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Good luck to both. But coming from someone that had never done it before, it was easier than I thought once I actually had the screws off. Google 'Dinquas' and check out his rejet guide. It's a step by step instruction that helped my mechanically challenged ass a great deal. I highly recommend it.
 

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Why is everyone so quick to tell him to rejet? He's got a new exaust on there, and I really don't think he's running THAT lean because of them.

I can't, for the life of me, remember anyone saying that a new exaust would make your engine run hot and ruin it unless you rejet, until this thread. Like I said, in my opinion, it's not "needed" right away, and on top of that, you are NOT ruining your engine by running it with stock jets...

Starting to equate rejetting with windex. Your tire flat? Put some windex on it. Your seat have a tear in it? Windex. You have new exaust, windex!
 

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Pretty sure it's been mentioned here before but I was unable to locate a thread... You guys should know that those carb screws are technically not Phillips, they are "JIS Cross Head", which is a Japanese standard which is very similar to, but distinct from Phillips. The identifier is that little dot on the screw head. These screws are often found on cameras and photocopy machines.

JIS screws strip very easily when you use a standard Phillips screwdriver, but if you use a JIS screwdriver you can really crank on them. AFAIK the screwdrivers are only made in Japan by Japanese tool companies, like Vessel.
 

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Now that was a pro tip... thanks! Just ordered a set off ebay for future carb work.

Amazed, those JIS cross heads aren't carried by Harbor Freight, first for me!
 

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JIS screwdriver

I was able to find reasonably-priced US-made JIS screwdrivers here in the US. I mail-ordered them, can't remember from whom, though.

Another good tool for working on the carbs, both before and after you swap out the screws, is a mini-ratchet which uses standard screwdriver bits. I use the one from Home Depot. It's a handy tool for tight spots. I also use it with a 2-inch long bit to synch the carbs.
 
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