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Discussion Starter #1
Excuse me if this was asked on a previous thread.

So I haven’t had the pleasure of test driving a Street Triple. Looking for some insight from experience owners.

Would you recommend the Street Triple for urban commuting? (NYC riding, with lots of stop and go)

If so, would you say it’s friendly enough?

And if you can, how would you compare it to the Street Twin or Speed Twin?
 

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Yes it’s a fantastic urban bike. It’s just a fantastic bike.

I don’t know what running a bike in nyc is like these days but when I lived in Hell’s Kitchen I had a gpz 900r and it was a total fucking pain in the ass parking ticket generator (even when I would pull the plate). But maybe you somehow have a garage.

In any case I can’t compare it to those other two bikes. I can compare to a thruxton r and I would say the str is better in the city given weight and handling.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes it’s a fantastic urban bike. It’s just a fantastic bike.

I don’t know what running a bike in nyc is like these days but when I lived in Hell’s Kitchen I had a gpz 900r and it was a total fucking pain in the ass parking ticket generator (even when I would pull the plate). But maybe you somehow have a garage.

In any case I can’t compare it to those other two bikes. I can compare to a thruxton r and I would say the str is better in the city given weight and handling.
Appreciate the feedback Qwandree. Yeah, those parking tickets are no joke around here. I do have a place to store it overnight.
 

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If this bike is just going to be for urban commuting with no need or desire to take it outside city limits, or it's a second bike just for commuting, maybe look at an electric? Zero makes some nice ones.
 
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I own a 2019 R and I would say there may be better choices for stop-and-go traffic. I find the bike is a little finicky when pulling away from a dead stop; the clutch action is nice and light but doesn’t have the greatest feel, the engagement point is quite narrow. Triumph touts the bike’s lower first and second gears compared to the previous generation, but it still feels like you have to slip the clutch a fair bit to get the bike moving smoothly. For the kind of riding you’re describing, I wonder if an MT-07 might suit you better.
 

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Adding in my two thoughts here. I live in Brooklyn and have a 2019 765 R. I find the bike to be great for commuting but, like others have said, there are better options. With that in mind, I mostly use my bike for leisure and the occasional grocery trip. The bike is super nimble in the city so I wouldn't be too concerned about weaving around stuff. Def put it in sport mode for the fuel map and road for everything else; like many others have commented in the forum, its much smoother than road for some reason. Best of luck with your decision!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If this bike is just going to be for urban commuting with no need or desire to take it outside city limits, or it's a second bike just for commuting, maybe look at an electric? Zero makes some nice ones.
Well most of my riding 80% will be commuting to and from work, urban driving. 10% rides to NJ to ride out with family. 10% here for some long stretches on the weekends. It would be the only bike I would hold for now. Not a second one so, no EV yet. I want something I can grow old with really. To do maintenance on it and hear the engine when riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I own a 2019 R and I would say there may be better choices for stop-and-go traffic. I find the bike is a little finicky when pulling away from a dead stop; the clutch action is nice and light but doesn’t have the greatest feel, the engagement point is quite narrow. Triumph touts the bike’s lower first and second gears compared to the previous generation, but it still feels like you have to slip the clutch a fair bit to get the bike moving smoothly. For the kind of riding you’re describing, I wonder if an MT-07 might suit you better.
Thanks for the insight on how the clutch feels. Yes I heard very good things about the MT-07 and was considering it. But my choice has been made for a Triumph otherwise I would take my friends offer on his 2015 Yamaha r3 that he’s willing to sell me for $2900.
I was also reading on the upcoming, 2021 Trident, which seems promising for the urban commute.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Adding in my two thoughts here. I live in Brooklyn and have a 2019 765 R. I find the bike to be great for commuting but, like others have said, there are better options. With that in mind, I mostly use my bike for leisure and the occasional grocery trip. The bike is super nimble in the city so I wouldn't be too concerned about weaving around stuff. Def put it in sport mode for the fuel map and road for everything else; like many others have commented in the forum, its much smoother than road for some reason. Best of luck with your decision!
Thank you for your thoughts. Much valued and appreciated since you know the metro area.
 

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Well most of my riding 80% will be commuting to and from work, urban driving. 10% rides to NJ to ride out with family. 10% here for some long stretches on the weekends. It would be the only bike I would hold for now. Not a second one so, no EV yet. I want something I can grow old with really. To do maintenance on it and hear the engine when riding.
Whelp...there goes that idea. My only other advice would be that since this is going to be your only bike, make sure to get the one the speaks to you. I've had my Street Triple since March 2013 and still get a little thrill every time I fire it up, whether that's for a trip to the hills, a multi-day tour, or just going to work.
 
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I commute daily on my 19 765R. I'll agree with the others about clutch engagement. I always feel like I'm slipping the clutch a lot coming from a stop to get the bike moving smoothly, but I guess that's just how it is... In terms of comfort, it's fine. It's not hard like an R6, but honestly, maybe a 765S would be better. We moved out of Park Slope a decade ago & at that time, I was commuting on a CB750 Nighthawk which was like a nice couch over potholes. Now in San Diego where the roads are marginally better, the 765R shines but I wouldn't kick an S out of bed just for being a bit softer for the commute.
 

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Funny you guys bring up the clutch engagement. I had the same experience with mine until I changed the rear sprocket to +2, made a huge difference with that.

I commute on mine and have no complaints although I toy with the idea of getting a VFR or similar for the wet season and 2 up riding.
 

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FWIW, back in the Nineties I commuted on my 1991 Honda Hawk GT (47,000 miles in four years), and never gave the clutch a thought—pulling away from a dead stop was as easy and natural as walking. On the Street Triple R I always feel like I have to pay attention, even if it’s just a little bit, when pulling away from a stop. Virtually all of my riding now is pleasure riding out on country roads, but if I was commuting every day the clutch/takeoff issue would get old real quick.
 

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You mentioned the Street Twin, and that is what I would buy in your place or maybe the new Trident 660 due to the lower cost.
Both bikes would seen adequate and still be great fun when you escape from the city.
 

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FWIW, back in the Nineties I commuted on my 1991 Honda Hawk GT (47,000 miles in four years), and never gave the clutch a thought—pulling away from a dead stop was as easy and natural as walking. On the Street Triple R I always feel like I have to pay attention, even if it’s just a little bit, when pulling away from a stop. Virtually all of my riding now is pleasure riding out on country roads, but if I was commuting every day the clutch/takeoff issue would get old real quick.
All this talk about the clutch has me puzzled. I wonder if it has something to do with whatever changes were made to make it "slip and assist", because even with the taller first gear by comparison to the 765's (and the previous generation 675's) getting my 13 675R rolling is easy as pie.
 

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All this talk about the clutch has me puzzled. I wonder if it has something to do with whatever changes were made to make it "slip and assist", because even with the taller first gear by comparison to the 765's (and the previous generation 675's) getting my 13 675R rolling is easy as pie.
Interesting thought, you may be on to something...
 

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I don’t understand the problem mentioned about the clutch. We’re on our 4th Street Triple from a 675 R to a 2020 765RS and none have needed excessive slipping to get the bike moving. May be more a case of technique than an issue with the bike. Anyway, I totally agree with the comments about what a creat city bike they are. Light with more than enough power to anything you want and great handling. Suspension is on the sporty side so keep that in mind. The Street Twin (we’ve had one of those too) is a little bit heavier but and unbelievable capable ride and in many ways better suited to city riding. Search for some of the early reviews from India and you’ll get some great feedback on riding in traffic. Speed Twin is equally good at that and mostly a better bike. Weight is about the same but hugely more powerful. Overkill perhaps.

You say you want a bike to grow old with. Street Twin wins hands down in that department. Ride them and find out which suits you best.
 

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I really don't think the clutch is as bad as this thread might make it sound.

Yes, it requires a little bit more slipping (finesse, if you will) than say a Yamaha MT-09 (a bike I'm familiar with). I noticed it on my 2018 RS. I think it's a bit better on my 2020 (or I'm just so used to how the clutch engages). I liken it to how my S2000 was and my MX-5 is. They aren't the most powerful down low and require a little more finesse (slipping) to get started. But I can make both of them (and my Street Triple) take off if I need to. So, ya, you have to adjust what you're used to, but it's not bad.

With regards to the original question, I love my Street Triple and commute on it, but my commuting is probably MUCH different than the OP's in NYC. I think it would be a bit frustrating having a bike that wants to go (and makes me want to go) and being stuck in what I assume is congested, sometimes(?) grid locked, traffic. It's definitely nimble enough and, I think, narrow enough, but it wants to go, not crawl around.

With that said, definitely ride both!
 
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Discussion Starter #19
You mentioned the Street Twin, and that is what I would buy in your place or maybe the new Trident 660 due to the lower cost.
Both bikes would seen adequate and still be great fun when you escape from the city.
I’m starting to come to the same conclusion myself. I guess I needed to hear it from someone for the reassurance. Even the speed twin might me a bit to much for the city. If I find a great deal on a street twin I think I’ll go for it. I also don’t mind waiting to see what the trident will be about. Kind of excited for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I don’t understand the problem mentioned about the clutch. We’re on our 4th Street Triple from a 675 R to a 2020 765RS and none have needed excessive slipping to get the bike moving. May be more a case of technique than an issue with the bike. Anyway, I totally agree with the comments about what a creat city bike they are. Light with more than enough power to anything you want and great handling. Suspension is on the sporty side so keep that in mind. The Street Twin (we’ve had one of those too) is a little bit heavier but and unbelievable capable ride and in many ways better suited to city riding. Search for some of the early reviews from India and you’ll get some great feedback on riding in traffic. Speed Twin is equally good at that and mostly a better bike. Weight is about the same but hugely more powerful. Overkill perhaps.

You say you want a bike to grow old with. Street Twin wins hands down in that department. Ride them and find out which suits you best.
Loved the feedback, thank you.
 
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