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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I currently ride a Suzuki TU250 (which I got as a starter bike) and even though it probably wouldn't be for another year or so until I upgrade, I have started research now.

The Triumph Street Triple is definitely on my short list for possible upgrades. I have yet to sit on one (which I know is a must) and a test ride would be ideal.

Did anyone else here upgrade to the Street Triple as a second bike? Do you all recommend this as a good second bike?

Any and all comments/tips/suggestions are appreciated
 

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I dunno about as a second bike. I picked up a '12 street triple r new, as my first bike in march. Now getting ready to put it up for the winter with about 6300 miles on it. I love it. Dont test ride one unless youre sure youre going to get one. Because you will think of nothing else until you can ride it again.

Sent from my DROIDX using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Hello all,

I currently ride a Suzuki TU250 (which I got as a starter bike) and even though it probably wouldn't be for another year or so until I upgrade, I have started research now.

The Triumph Street Triple is definitely on my short list for possible upgrades. I have yet to sit on one (which I know is a must) and a test ride would be ideal.

Did anyone else here upgrade to the Street Triple as a second bike? Do you all recommend this as a good second bike?

Any and all comments/tips/suggestions are appreciated
IMO: Once you get the basic riding skills down, handling the Striple, is not over the top. Most riders get into trouble when the unexpected happens, it's important to know what to do, how to do it and when. Keep in mind that we never graduate. It's a fun bike........ go have some fun.
 

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Once you ride an R your Suzuki will become your second bike.
I have a three prong attack when it comes to bikes, A single, a twin and a triple.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Once you ride an R your Suzuki will become your second bike.
I have a three prong attack when it comes to bikes, A single, a twin and a triple.
Well to get the Street Triple I would sell the Suzuki. I meant second as in sequentially, not in amount of use.
 

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With about 10K miles on the 250 you'll be fine. Just be prepaired to take it easy while you get used to it, as you would with any new bike.

It's a lousy first bike though. There's so much that you don't learn about anticipation, reading the traffic, getting the best out of the bike. It's all too easy with the power that the Street has - and if you try to use all the power, as a newby you'll probably die. It gets you into a very bad habit of riding under restraint.

Rob
 

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I actually just got my Striple last weekend after riding a xt250 for about 3 months. about 2 weeks after I got my XT i was told my commute was going to change (but about 140 miles a day 2 times a week) hence the need for a quick upgrade. But on to your question, YES its a great upgrade. you just need to be careful of the power, as long as you realize its there and respect it you should be fine. just make sure you have the basics down on your 250, handling and situational awareness. good luck!!
 

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A Street Triple as a SECOND bike .. A Street Triple is Second to NONE.. :bighand
 

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Would you mind expanding on what you meant by that?
As a beginner, snapping open the throttle or snatching the brakes for hard braking could very well kill you on a bike like the Street. It will certainly frighten you, so you learn to be careful with throttle and brakes. That isn't a bad thing, but you don't go on to learn how to extract the maximum power from the bike. Restraint becomes a habit.

In fact learning to extract the maximum power from the bike is never a good idea unless you learn it on a bike with limited power to extract. Then you can transfer the skill.

Back to the question - you end up always riding with an element of caution and full throttle and hard braking become something that you only ever do in a straight line on a good dry road - if you ever do them at all. This somewhat defeats the point of the bike, I think. Obviously you're not going to ride flat out all the time (although you can come close to that while you're learning on a smaller bike), but you should be completely comfortable with what the bike can do when it's unleashed for the times when you need (or just want) to do that.

If you were to start on a 50cc 'ped, you'd learn a completely different style of riding where you have to ride with throttle pinned against the stop 100% of the time. Learning to ride like that isn't a particularly good idea either.

Rob
 

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If you were to start on a 50cc 'ped, you'd learn a completely different style of riding where you have to ride with throttle pinned against the stop 100% of the time. Learning to ride like that isn't a particularly good idea either.

Rob
I ran into that same problem when switching from my 250 duel sport to the Triple. I was used to riding wide open on the fwy all the time. I have noticed its hard to adjust to just lightly opening the throttle in 6th to keep me at 70-80mph. and on city streets, even harder, i feel like i am barly giving it gas at all. granted, i am still breaking it in, so i really am barely giving it any gas. but still the modulation is a weird adjustment.
 

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When I upgraded from my Ninja 250r two years ago, I was a bit unsure as to how I would go with a much more powerful bike. Shouldn't have worried. Half way home from the dealership I was more relaxed and confident than I ever thought I would be. With that torqey engine and comfortable riding position I found it to be very easy to ride.
 

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If you're buying from new by the time it's run you'll be totally used to the extra power. Go for it, you'll not regret it.
Rob
 

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My streety was/is my first street bike. Three words of caution, RESPECT THE THROTTLE. Respect the machine and she will purr like a kitty. Dont respect her, and she'll buck like a bull.
 

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My streety was/is my first street bike. Three words of caution, RESPECT THE THROTTLE. Respect the machine and she will purr like a kitty. Dont respect her, and she'll buck like a bull.
And that is with a tamer ECU .. But I've learned to make mine buck .. And love her more for it . :D
 

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If you have no experience on a sportbike I don't think it's a wise choice. I think the best choice is to have some experience sport riding. Even though the Street is the "smaller" of two bikes, it is still very powerful, and the power comes on fast. It will wheelie over hills, on quick shifts, and on flat ground. Brakes and suspension are finely tuned and it's got a light and agile turn-in.


It's certainly not a bad choice, but I would start on something more forgiving first. I'm not a fan of the "just take it easy" argument. What's the point of having the bike if your going to ride around and baby it?
 

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I've owned a lot of motorcycles and there is no one bike that does it all. For in-town light shopping or going to Subway for lunch and bringing back a refill on my soda, I take my Vespa. I couldn't do that even with a backpack on my Streetie. A scooter with all that room under the seat, maneuverability, high mileage, is the best 2-wheeled vehicle for city riding, IMO. The Street Triple is for almost everything else and I prefer it on the highway and of course it is way cooler than a scooter. If I could only have one bike ever, it would be the Ninja 650r. It will do it all. Since I can have 2 or more bikes, the 650r would not be one of them. I think I've got all my bases covered with the Vespa GTS 300 Super and the Streetie.
 

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I've owned a lot of motorcycles and there is no one bike that does it all. For in-town light shopping or going to Subway for lunch and bringing back a refill on my soda, I take my Vespa. I couldn't do that even with a backpack on my Streetie. A scooter with all that room under the seat, maneuverability, high mileage, is the best 2-wheeled vehicle for city riding, IMO. The Street Triple is for almost everything else and I prefer it on the highway and of course it is way cooler than a scooter. If I could only have one bike ever, it would be the Ninja 650r. It will do it all. Since I can have 2 or more bikes, the 650r would not be one of them. I think I've got all my bases covered with the Vespa GTS 300 Super and the Streetie.
I had a Yamaha, Tmax for a few years and I agree, the maxi-scooters are ideal for the city/suburbs. I used mine for commuting and did a lot of weekend day trips.
Today my Striple is the work horse, and my Sprint is the weekender, however I like them both so much I use them both, for both. Now all I need is a Daytona. :)
 
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