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2004 Bonneville Black
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'04 Bonnie: Cleaning my stock carbs (and any carbs) for the first time. Haynes manual says to submerge the carb bodies in carb cleaner for 20 mins. However, it doesn't say anything about removing the hoses and I certainly don't want to remove the TPS and disturb those settings or attempt to separate the carbs. Assuming I pull the hoses off - that seems straightforward enough - and I only disassemble one carb at a time (for fear of losing or swapping parts), how do I submerge the carb bodies, one at a time, without damaging the TPS? I've got a 1 gallon can of GUNK carb cleaner with parts basket.

I know there are a ton of carb cleaning threads here and have been scouring, but I don't see the solution. There's got to be a better way. Many thanks in advance.
 

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2004 Daytona 955i, 2018 Indian Roadmaster, 1980 CB650C in resto
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I know there are a ton of carb cleaning threads here and have been scouring, but I don't see the solution.
HA!

Okay, now that that’s been said...

I wouldn’t dunk electrical components or rubber comments. I’ll risk a dumb question; why are you cleaning the carbs? Are you responding to some symptoms, or just taking routine maintenance to a whole new level? I can see a 16 year old bike running fine without needed a full tear down. But if it sat for a couple of years, it might be necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
HA!

Okay, now that that’s been said...

I wouldn’t dunk electrical components or rubber comments. I’ll risk a dumb question; why are you cleaning the carbs? Are you responding to some symptoms, or just taking routine maintenance to a whole new level? I can see a 16 year old bike running fine without needed a full tear down. But if it sat for a couple of years, it might be necessary.
Totally fair question! I’m trying very hard not be THAT guy: Bike sputtered once? Must be the carbs bro. Anyhow, the bike sat for 2-3 years and I’m noticing poor throttle response and acceleration, particularly on the low end. I’ve tried everything else I can think of: carb sync, compression test, valve clearances, chain adjustment, fuel tap filter, air filter, spark plugs, throttle cables all look good.

I did find after I took the carbs off that the SAIS hose rubber coupling that connects to the left intake port (opposite where the right side blanking cap is), is totally deteriorated and needs to be replaced (and will be replaced). Could that loss of vacuum be the culprit?

I haven’t disassembled them yet and am wondering if it’s worth it now having discovered the SAIS hose problem. They look relatively clean so far...

742192

742193
742194
 

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Yes, the deteriorated rubber vacuum hose certainly can cause issues with a vacuum leak.
No I would not do a full disassembly and dunk. If they need cleaning it can be done with a basic Q-tip and cleaner while removing and cleaning the jets. If a crab is really bad from sitting with fuel in it and dried deposits then a full dunk might be required. More harm than good can come from total disassembly and putting in cleaner unless you are very familiar with carb assembly.
Replace the AIS rubber & the caps between the carbs & the cylinders on the intake manifold. Also inspect the rubber boots from the air box to the carbs and carbs to the manifold - Triumph rubber is not the most resilient to deterioration.
 

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Just did similar. Disclaimer, I’m a shoddy mechanic. Inherited a 2003 America. Only ran on choke. Wouldn’t rev. Pulled the carbs. Looked pretty clean but removed jets. Soaked them and cleaned them with gas torch cleaner. Sprayed and wiped out the carb. Put it back together and had a fuel leak. Ugh. Yep misrouted the fuel hose. Thank goodness it wasn’t the carb. Fixed that. Now it runs great. The big job was getting them off/on the bike.
 

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Its in 99.9% of the cases just a gummed up pilot jet. OP, just remove the sais system entirely. One less thing that can go wrong
 

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As indicated, replacing the hoses as necessary is a good start.
Have you considered running any type of carb cleaner in the fuel tank as a possible solution before diving deep into submersive carb cleaning. Based on your pix the carbs look pretty clean, and perhaps a minimal amount of carb cleaning with an additive may help enough to overcome the existing issues.
Good luck, you may need a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As indicated, replacing the hoses as necessary is a good start.
Have you considered running any type of carb cleaner in the fuel tank as a possible solution before diving deep into submersive carb cleaning. Based on your pix the carbs look pretty clean, and perhaps a minimal amount of carb cleaning with an additive may help enough to overcome the existing issues.
Good luck, you may need a little.
Yes, every year I run a sea foam treatment through. You’re right, overall they are in pretty good shape.

Partial update: Thanks to everyone who has chimed in so far! For anyone interested, I had a little crud in the left float bowl (pic below), and decided to soak the bowls and jets for good measure since I was this far down the road anyway. As an aside, yikes, those pilot jets were a little tricky to get out. Glad I didn’t bother soaking the body itself. A little carb cleaner and a q-tip was an excellent suggestion. Waiting on some new air intake rubbers - I figure I might as well replace all the rubber I can while I’m working on the area. Then I’ll put it all back together and with removal of the crud and stopping the AIS leak, plus some of that luck, I’ll be back in business.

OP, just remove the sais system entirely. One less thing that can go wrong
I agree that makes sense. Seems some have differing opinions on the board about AIS removal. Fewer hoses and easier access to the spark plugs with no mechanical downside is enough of a selling point for me. Only negative byproduct is an ever so slightly less clean emission?

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When you have the pilot jets out to clean - The side emulsion holes are larger and not the problem, it.s the very, very small .015" hole it the end that gets clogged or partial blockage. Make certain that little guy is clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When you have the pilot jets out to clean - The side emulsion holes are larger and not the problem, it.s the very, very small .015" hole it the end that gets clogged or partial blockage. Make certain that little guy is clean.
Yup, I saw that little guy. I swear it got bigger after I dunked it, but probably just wishful thinking.
 

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Many people mistake the side holes in the tubes for the actual jet orifices.
Make sure its 100% clear and no particles in the tube. It takes just a touch of something to cause some issues.

I have the rubber boots for my bike waiting to replace them one of these times. Mine are still the originals and I should get to that. On that note - take care to get the boot from the carb to the manifold in the correct orientation. One end/ side is angled a bit and needs to go on right.

I not a big miracle in a bottle guy but that Seafaom seems to be dang good stuff. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Many people mistake the side holes in the tubes for the actual jet orifices.
Make sure its 100% clear and no particles in the tube. It takes just a touch of something to cause some issues.

I have the rubber boots for my bike waiting to replace them one of these times. Mine are still the originals and I should get to that. On that note - take care to get the boot from the carb to the manifold in the correct orientation. One end/ side is angled a bit and needs to go on right.
I noticed that after I removed them. There’s a small notch on them, I assume that indicates top (higher in the middle, lower on the sides)?
 

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Not sure without looking - But it sounds like you got it under control.
I know people have installed them backwards & they still seemed to work so it has to be a fairly slight angle and direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Final update: Success! For anyone still listening, I replaced the intake rubbers, blanking caps, intake adapter gaskets - one of them was totally fried - and removed the AIS entirely. Getting the carbs back on was one heck of a tight squeeze; I don’t want to ever do that again!

Finally got out of the garage today. After removal of the gunk in carb bowls, general carb cleaning and closing all the small vacuum leaks, throttle response is so much better than before. It even cold starts better than I can remember. Thanks again to everyone who offered suggestions along the way.
 

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Good job. If you have to remove the carbs ever again - pull the air box back as far as it will go. It really is pretty easy to pull the set after that.
Thanks for updating your work and results for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Good job. If you have to remove the carbs ever again - pull the air box back as far as it will go. It really is pretty easy to pull the set after that.
Thanks for updating your work and results for everyone.
Thanks. I did do that. Getting out wasn’t too bad, but getting them back in was a pain.
 
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