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Well, if it's got genitals or handlebars... you probably get what I'm driving at... I got sick of the diabolical clutch action on my 1980 T140E, so put a 7 plate clutch kit in it. Took lots of care, scrupulously clean workshop practice etc etc, and it feels great now, and seems to work without grinding and horrible action. Only thing is - she will no longer start reliably. Sooo...the old story: "I fixed my Triumph (and now it doesn't go anymore)" Anyone been there...?
Well, did all the usual (as well as searching this forum and noting lots of good stuff by such as Stuart Mac, Rancid Peg, Tiger TR7RV and Kadutz), and finally thought I'd try new coils, leads and plugs. How hard can it be, there's only so much can go wrong (and I've owned a few T140s before)? Still no go yesterday despite a faint chuff initially, plenty of spark, fuel, no kill switch or obvious nastiness in wiring, and I didn't even bother kicking it 73 times 'just in case', cos when it won't go it just won't.

Well, today tried it and thought I'd just try a different routine - taps and ignition on, free clutch, and NO CHOKE. She fired right up and burbled away quite happily at about 900RPM.
So my question/observation: why would a bit just change its starting routine preference after a clutch rebuild? Before it was always the usual free clutch, ign and petrol on, choke lever depressed and bang! Now it seems to hate the choke... Weird bike...nearly ended up being chucked off the wharf at the bottom of the street into the harbour... cheers (I think) - Pat
Those 7 plate clutches are great, aren't they? It seems like when one fixes (updates) something on these bikes, it really affects another area, (starting usually). Mine starts with no choke. But then, I I have to depress the lever right away. Go figure.
 

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Hi DrPat,, If... all you did was clutch & starting changed you may be experiencing minor clutch slip during kicking. I've had experience with this. Clutch may not slip on road, but kicking puts a lot of force on clutch.

You don't say what brand 7 plate kit you used. I have lots of experience with Hyde, only a little with Aerco. Hyde's I've been involved with had same stack height of all plates as stock Triumph. However my new Aerco is thinner. So to compensate I've found I have to go deeper with spring nuts. Especially with 650 springs in T140 motor. Nominal of all 14 plates stacked is 1.400". If yours is thinner, go deeper with nuts by that amount.

Id double check rod adjustment also as new plates bed quickly using up rod play, which will lead to slip. After about 3 adjustments over a few hundred miles I find it settles down & holds adjustment well.

Not saying this is cause, but keep it in mind. If nothing else changed, it very well could be cause.
Don
That is a good technical thought since the only change you made was the clutch. It work fine before the new clutch. I agree recheck your adjustments.
 

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Interesting discussion gentlemen, thank you all. I also have a 1979 T140 with such an awful clutch that riding in town was hard work. I replaced it last summer with a seven plate and now its as good as any modern bike. Its quite an easy changeout so I highly recommend it. ( I also did the obvious like replacing cable etc). Funnily enough, I also had starting problems that turned out to be nothing to do with the clutch. At the same time as the clutch work I took the opportunity to strip the mark 2 carbs and clean them out. The startup and running issues came immediately afterwards. It turned out that I had one of the choke cables under the tank sticking slightly. All of these cables need to be free, and obviously, the throttle valves have to lift/bottom out together and the throttle stop and pilot air screws set up correctly. Any bike that starts from cold without the choke is probably running way to rich.
 
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