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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This thread is an over view of brake pad replacement on the Hinckley twins. It is merely meant as a reference – mainly for the benefit of people who have not done much hands on motorcycle maintenance, who want to see what is involved. It is assumed that you have mechanical aptitude, ie know how to use hand tools and so on. Also, this is not meant to be a replacement for the OEM or Haynes manuals – it’s just to show you what things look like. That’s why there’s a ton of pictures!

So, first off the rear brake. I did this job with the wheel and silencers in place – no problem. There is plenty of clearance. You do not need to undo the brake bleed nipple or the banjo bolts holding the brake line in place.

The first thing is to slacken off the brake pad sliding pins. These are a long pin with an allen head on them. Crack the tension with the brake still mounted on the bike. This picture is intended to show you what pins I am talking about. It is easiest to crack the tension first, then remove the caliper from the bike for further work.



With the two pins out, you can work the brake pads out – they come out very easily.



When they are out you are left with this:



The hanger bracket that mounts the brake to the bike is also on sliding pins, protected by rubber covers. Inspect those, and make sure they are not split. They have to be replaced if they are damaged and torn. Also check the hanger bracket slides easily.

Clean the caliper. Now – this will cause consternation among some of you, but too bad, this is how I do it. You must assume all responsibility for how you clean your calipers, but I have done it this way on bikes since 1992, and have never seen a brake seizure, seal failure or any other problem.

So, I take a shop towel and lightly spray it with WD40. Just a little – it should not be dripping. I then clean all around the caliper, and wipe the outside of the pistons, and clean the spring clips. I then wipe the surfaces dry with another clean shop towel. Space can be limited, so I poke the towel into various gaps with a thin screwdriver – BUY VERY CAREFULLY. You must NOT scratch the pistons, that can cause brake fluid leakage later on. No good. It is very important to clean the pistons so that you do not damage the seals when pushing the pistons back in.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Once the caliper is cleaned satisfactorily, you must push the pistons back into the caliper. I find it best to do both at the same time. I do this by using the old brake pad, and a small C clamp. They should actually push back in easily by hand – if they are really tight then there is a problem, and the caliper must be stripped totally.

Here are the pistons being pushed in:




Although the G clamp has to be over to one side, the pistons are so easy to move that the brake pad is able to apply enough pressure to push both pistons back in.

Here is the caliper with both pistons pushed properly back:



Give the caliper a wipe down, and apply a very thin layer of high temperature brake caliper grease to the metal clip and the ends of the pistons. This kind of high temp caliper grease is available at standard auto parts stores. It is a bit pricey, but a tube like this will last the average home mechanic about 20 years without any problem.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I replaced my brake pads with EBC sintered HH pads which I bought from Triumph performance USA (www.triumphperformanceusa.com), but I know British Customs sell them too. These apparently give much better braking on the stock brake discs than the stock pads do. This picture shows a new EBC pad and the old stock pad. There is still life left on the stock pad, but I fancy having the bike in tip top condition for the coming riding season.



Apply a little smear of grease to the edges of the brake pad backing plate, where it will slide over the clip surfaces in the caliper. You don’t need much. It’s a good idea to smear some on the backside of the pad to prevent corrosion.

ON NO ACCOUNT ALLOW ANY GREASE ON THE FRONT SIDE OF THE PAD THAT TOUCHES THE BRAKE DISC.



Slide the brake pads into place in the caliper



Apply a little grease to the hanger pins, including the threads (this is too much grease in the picture, once smeared around you wipe off the excess):

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
And reinstall them into the caliper assembly. Check around the caliper to make sure that there is no excess grease anywhere – you do not want it finding its way onto the brake disc or onto the friction surfaces of the brake pads. Now mount the caliper onto the bike. Smear a little grease on the mounting bolts:




Once you have reassembled the caliper onto the bike, and made sure all the bolts and pins are correctly tightened, check the wheel for free rotation, and then pump the brake pedal to check brake operation. Then check wheel rotation again. The wheel should be free, but a very slight drag from the brake pads is normal. Check your brake fluid reservoir level is OK.



The front brake is similar, I will have less chat here, because the procedure is largely the same, but I have these pics to show the fundamental differences.

Brake caliper on the bike:



This little cap comes off before you remove the caliper

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It protects a slider pin similar to those on the rear brake. The front caliper has only one pin. Crack the tension on this pin before removing the caliper:



Now you can remove the caliper, and remove the slider pin. Once that is done, the old brake pads come out very easily, and you can clean the caliper as before. Again check the hanger plate slides freely on its slider pins in the brake caliper housing.

Here is the cleaned caliper:



Use an old brake pad and small C clamp to compress the pistons back into the housing:



Caliper assembly with brake pistons pushed back:

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Clean the spring clips and apply a thin coat of high temperature brake caliper grease:



Reinstall the spring clips (one at each end on the front brake caliper)



Now install the brake pads. Again, a very light smear of grease on the sliding edges of the pads and in the holes the slide pin goes through is a good idea, as well as a light smear on the slide pin itself. Hold one brake pad in place, and slide the pin part way through:



Now insert the second brake pad, and finish installing the slide pin. These are the EBC sintered HH pads again:



Now you can check around for excess grease (you can see in my pictures that there was some that built up after sliding pins in place). Clean this off, and install the brake caliper on the bike. Don’t forget to put a little smear of grease on the brake mounting bolt threads, but be sure there is not so much on them that it pokes through the bolt holes and onto the brake disc.

Check all the bolts and pins for tightness, and replace the little pin cover.

Now check the will spins freely, then pump the brake a few times and check brake operation, spin the wheel again to check all is well, and hey presto, you have replaced the brake pads on your bike, in readiness for a blast around the twisties (or whatever is your choice).
 

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Nicely done, Prop! :thumbsup:

I could add a few things:

Don't apply the brake lever while the caliper is off. If you ever have to take the caliper off but are not working on the brake, put a piece of wood that is the approximate thickness of the brake rotor (1/4 inch is good) between the brake pads. This is easier than trying to pry the pads apart after you've squeezed them together.

If you're changing the pads and you've added brake fluid in the meantime, watch the fluid level as you push the pistons in, it will rise, maybe more than expected. You might have to remove some fluid from the reservoir with a syringe.

When greasing the pins and other surfaces, I like to smear a very thin film over the area with my finger, and remove the excess. Only very small quantities are needed, any blobs mean there is too much. If there's old grease and dirt, clean first with your solvent of choice and wipe off well.

And finally, to repeat: No lubricants on the brake pad surfaces, ever! This includes WD40 and other solvents, except brake cleaner, and your greasy hands.

Torque values, from Haynes:

Caliper pins: 18NM (tighten them after mounting the caliper)
Caliper bolts: 28NM front, 40NM rear
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Balto! Excellent points. I knew I'd miss something in the write up! :D
 

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Excellent stuff Prop!!

Sound advice with great detailed info and pictures!

I think tho that you should point out that it isn't a prerequisite of the changing of pads
that you have to bring your bike into the dining room as you seem to have done!!

Altho I certainly wish I could!!

Well done, and certainly worthy of inclusion in the "Great sources of info" sticky.


V.
 

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Prop how many miles are you getting from a set of pads? I'm warring out the front at 5,000 miles still on the factory rear pads. I don't use the rear brake that often. Do you think the sintered pads might last a little longer? Nice visuals thats better than the manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
The rear pads in the pictures have 12000 miles on them, and I would say only have a couple of thousand left. After 12000 miles my front pads were about 50% worn. I try and ride smoothly, so that I'm not on the brakes a lot - I suspect individual riding style has a lot to do with it. I have heard of other people going through rears in 6000 to 8000 miles.

I don't expect the EBC HH pads to last longer than stock - maybe they'll even wear out quicker. i don't mind that. In my experience it's good to give bike brakes a going over once a year or every 18 months or so anyway. The various mechanisms are not as well protected as on cars, so it's good practice to keep them clean and free.
 

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Hi,

Great post. I wish I had this before doing mine, the Haynes B&W pictures are too small and unclear whereas yours are great.

I recently changed my front rotor and pads with the EBC MD601LS floating version and the HH sintered discs.

After a couple of hundred miles they have bedded in nicely and work well, not quite the big difference I was led to believe, but better all the same.

Question: The rotor is scored slightly, not deep, but is definitely finely scored. Is this normal and just a result if fitting sintered pads. or should I be talking a closer look?

cheers

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Depends what you mean by scoring - every brake rotor I have had on a bike has some concentric texture to it, and I think that's normal - I suspect that's what you mean. As you drag a fingernail (clean and no grease!) over the surface of the rotor from inside to outside you can feel ridges, but not deep. As far as I know that is normal whatever pads you use.
 

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I changed my pads out a couple weeks ago. One thing I discovered that I thought I would mention. I found that if I remove the cover on the brake fluid reservoir, I can use my fingers to push the pistons back into the calipers. No tools required.

Nice pics, Prop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's a good way to do it - in fact, for anyone who has never done this, if you cannot push the pistons in by hand, there is a problem. Do not be tempted to force the pistons in with a clamp, you can damage the bores of the caliper to a point where the whole thing has to be replaced. A word of caution, that's all.
 

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Good Thread with good pics! I will probably forget most of it by the time I replace my pads. I just finished my 24000 mile maintenance and moved the bike out of the front room back to the garage.:D The front (stock) pads still have 75% of the pads left and the rears have 50% left. I try to stay away from the big cities, and I guess riding in the backwoods with few twisties is kinda easy on pads.
 

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I changed my pads out a couple weeks ago. One thing I discovered that I thought I would mention. I found that if I remove the cover on the brake fluid reservoir, I can use my fingers to push the pistons back into the calipers. No tools required.

Nice pics, Prop!
Good idea. I used channel locks with a piece of wood on pistons - real easy 'cause my hands were not quite strong enough.
 

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I changed my pads out a couple weeks ago. One thing I discovered that I thought I would mention. I found that if I remove the cover on the brake fluid reservoir, I can use my fingers to push the pistons back into the calipers. No tools required.
Yes, it's easier to push in the pistons if you vent the reservoir by loosening or removing the cover and the diaphragm. I've had the cover off when I've worked on them, and I could easily push the pistons in with my fingers.
 
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