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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at setting up the rider sag on my ST. I have only had this bike for a very short time so I am still finding things out about it.

The front has only preload adjustment and I will set this up accordingly.

The manual states the rear shock has both preload & rebound damping adjustment. The preload adjuster is at the top of the shock on the LH side.

But buggered if I can find the rebound adjuster. The manual shows this on the RH side near the rear brake but I cannot locate the screw.

It is a standard stock but I am blind or have some models differ with only preload adjustment on the rear shock.

Assistance is appreciated :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Bazza, you're a champion :ClapHappy:

Found it on the LH side. Cannot believe the manual states that it is located on the RH side.

Cheers
 

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Bazza, you're a champion :ClapHappy:

Found it on the LH side. Cannot believe the manual states that it is located on the RH side.

Cheers
Interesting, I have a 955 2004 and it is on the RHS.

It has obviously changed. But the manual hasn't been updated.

DaveM:cool:
 

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Does anyone know of a link on the web that explains a little bit about suspension.

I feel stupid saying it as most people seem to talk about rebound and preload like wheels and tyres but what do they actually mean and how is it best to adjust them??

On my old bandit I think it had only one adjustable "thing" on the rear shock (certainly only one I could find:confused:) I'm quite heavy and usually ride with a bit of weight in the top box so I tightened whatever it was up and it made a real difference but it was luck more than judgement.

I want to do something with my sprint but would rather have some idea what I'm doing before twisting this and that!?

By the way I'm 6'3'' and 16 stone - without all my gear and I ride with top box most of the time sometimes take a pillion but she's only 9 stone - is it fairly easy to keep changing settings or should I go for a compromise and choose a setting and stick with it?

I read this thread before christmas:
http://www.triumphrat.net/sprint-forum/89909-1050-sprint-fork-oils-springs-and-valving-my-observations.html
but it was way beyond my understanding or ability and kind've put me off fiddling. I haven't been able to find anything else that answers my questions in easy speak!

Sorry for the rambling post:eek: any advice / tips would be gratefully received.

Jon
 

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Does anyone know of a link on the web that explains a little bit about suspension.
Try here (yep, It's my own post but it's Sprint specific) and doesn't go into a lot of the detail that Chris' (brilliant) post does.

Also for some good undertanding go here and here for a start...

Go for it - suspension and tyres are the best way to make REAL improvements your bike..... unlike noisy pipes and bling which are sometimes a substitute for another problem that's best dealt with by Viagra :eek:.

Oops, here come the fun police...:policeman: :policeman: :policeman:

Muz
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Go for it - suspension and tyres are the best way to make REAL improvements your bike..... Muz

+1

Everyone should initially set up the sag on their bike to suit their weight. The stock suspension on the ST seems to be ok but it would be interesting to see if anyone has upgraded the suspension to see what the results were.
 

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+1

Everyone should initially set up the sag on their bike to suit their weight. The stock suspension on the ST seems to be ok but it would be interesting to see if anyone has upgraded the suspension to see what the results were.
This is on my 2004 955i Sprint ST;

I have a rebuilt rear stock Showa unit revalved etc to suit my weight and riding style, I have a stock spring with a 5mm spacer.

This makes the rear of my bike about 15mm higher than stock, the rebuilt unit I have set firm but it is also very compliant and soaks up all the bumps on our bumpy back roads.

The front I run set with the caps screwed in and above the triple clamp by 3mm (The manual states 5mm out for firm), I also have the fork tubes flush in the clamp and run 15wt fork oil with stock .75 springs.

This with Pilot Powers or Pilot race mediums provides very fast steering whilst maintaining higher speed stability and less fork dive than the standard 7.5wt fork oil.

The handling is very predictable very stable and corners like a Rhino on heat.

DaveM:cool:
 

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By the way I'm 6'3'' and 16 stone - without all my gear and I ride with top box most of the time sometimes take a pillion but she's only 9 stone - is it fairly easy to keep changing settings or should I go for a compromise and choose a setting and stick with it?Jon
The owner's manual gives suggested settings for one up, two up & two up with luggage. I reckon you could set the suspenders mid way between the one up & two up settings and use this as your base reference point. Then make incremental adjustments from there until you get to settings that you're happy with (I use a particularly bumpy road that I know well to test out the new settings). It's quite easy to change the preloads but the rear damper adjustment is awkward because it's difficult to get at and because the chain is there your clothes & hands can get dirty very easily.

Tip: write down the settings you've selected- it saves trying to remember them after you've gone out for a test ride on the bike!

DaveB.
 

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By the way I'm 6'3'' and 16 stone - without all my gear and I ride with top box most of the time sometimes take a pillion but she's only 9 stone - is it fairly easy to keep changing settings or should I go for a compromise and choose a setting and stick with it?
Jon
It is easy to change settings all you need is a flat blade screwdriver and it can be done in a minute.

Changing settings is optimal for hard riding and riding on goat tracks to avoid bottoming out. If you are doing highway miles on good roads with no corners changing the settings is not really necessary.
 

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shock rebuild

This is on my 2004 955i Sprint ST;

I have a rebuilt rear stock Showa unit revalved etc to suit my weight and riding style, I have a stock spring with a 5mm spacer.

This makes the rear of my bike about 15mm higher than stock, the rebuilt unit I have set firm but it is also very compliant and soaks up all the bumps on our bumpy back roads.

The front I run set with the caps screwed in and above the triple clamp by 3mm (The manual states 5mm out for firm), I also have the fork tubes flush in the clamp and run 15wt fork oil with stock .75 springs.

This with Pilot Powers or Pilot race mediums provides very fast steering whilst maintaining higher speed stability and less fork dive than the standard 7.5wt fork oil.

The handling is very predictable very stable and corners like a Rhino on heat.

DaveM:cool:
Hi Dave,
Am interested in the rear shock rebuild,
as it'll save me buying a new shock.
I'd previously been told that the 1050 shock isn't rebuildable ?
My 1050 Sprint shock is set up firm, i.e. fine for fast A roads, however the preload adjuster appears to be virtually siezed, & I dare not put a 1/2 drive socket on the preload adjuster, for fear of shearing it off.
It needs sorting, as I've a few weekends with luggauge planned soon.

From memory the 955 Sprint shock appears very similar,
does this have the plastic adjuster body also & can it be stripped & greased ?

Cheers, Neil.
 

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Hi Neil,

There is a company here in Brisbane Australia that did mine called RAD Shockie repairs.

They do nothing but specialise in motorcycle shocks and forks and have the gear to do the job of a rebuild on a supposed non re-buildable unit.

The Showa unit on your 1050 I think is pretty much identical o the 955 as are the front forks all made by Showa.
I do not think it was designed as a re-buildable unit but proper people with the right gear can do it..............just don't ask me how it's done!

Cheers,
DaveM:cool:
 

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Almost any suspension specialist worth his salt will rebuild your shock & re-valve / re-spring it to suit your weight / preferences. There's no rocket science in it, but there ARE specialist tools and know-how required.

Don't bother asking your dealer unless he's actually a suspension expert (IMO mine's a bonehead who I'd barely trust to work on my bicycle let alone the Sprint).

Find out who does all of the race bikes in your area and you're home & hosed.

BTW, the preload adjuster is actually a sealed hydraulic unit - you preload the spring with a collar that's displaced by oil that is in turn displaced by the adjuster screw. Apparently parts for those llittle beasties are available off the shelf - the Showa body is common to some Kawasakis as well from what I've been told.

Muz
 

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Cheers guys,
A few peeps here in the UK use K-Tech + a racing pal uses an other (I'll find out soon).

I've rebuilt rear shocks & upgraded front suspension units on previous machines (in earlier days I worked on hydraulic systems), hence I'm happy to have a go, & still have the gear,
but just wondered if the shock adjuster will strip out without breaking.

Long term, (until the 1300-3 Sprint GT is out)
I'd prefer to have a decent suspension unit with remote pre-load, which is more rebuildable,
once my shock is sorted I plan to upgrade the front springs & oil.

Cheers, Neil.
 

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thanks

I just bought a used '07 Sprint ST and badly needed to strengthen the rear rebound dampening (bouncy corning = bad) and could not for the life of me find the adjustment on the bike. Spent 10 minutes staring at the manual and cursing.

Thanks for asking & answering the question guys. :)
 

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and could not for the life of me find the adjustment on the bike.
Spent 10 minutes staring at the manual and cursing.
I had the same problem until I realized that the rear damping adjustment
was on the other side of the bike, contrary to what the instructions tell
you.... DOH :eek:

Tom
 
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