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Discussion Starter #1
Going to get back in to motorcycle riding (after 20+ years) and found a decently priced 2001 Sprint ST not too far away from me. I rode dirt bikes as a kid and teenager for fun, but now am looking to get back into it to "commute" from where I live to my job in North Dakota during summer. Of course I'll be riding it here at home too.
Are there any things I need to look out for? Things I need to check carefully?
You may ask why I'm looking at a Sprint ST.... Price for one and looks for the other. The bike just looks great. I know looks shouldn't really matter a whole lol. My biggest concern is reliability. The nearest Triumph dealer is a little over 100 miles south of me.

Any advice would be most appreciated! Thanks in advance....
 

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Well you have good taste in bikes, no question there. :)
If you can bring the bike to the dealership and see what they have to say, as for me I have a Striple and a Sprint ST 1050 and haven't had any issues, I bought both bikes used and had the local dealer go through the bikes front to back, they checked for any updates, recalls....etc. I bring them in when they need service and couldn't be happier with them.
I don't know if the Sprint is the ideal first bike, but that is a Pandora's Box so...........
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Allworld! Luckily, there is a Triumph dealer in the same town as where the motorcycle is, so that won't be a problem.
I guess one persons ideal first bike isn't another's lol, so we'll just leave it at that....
 

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Great bike choice! Just be sure to ride like everyone is out to kill you and you'll be fine! :D

Hopefully the dealer is a decent one and will help you determine this bikes worthiness. That said, I always check the mfg date code on tires, over 5yrs old and they get replaced no matter how they look. That might not fly with some here but I find hard tires to be a poor choice in rain or when maneuvering, braking,etc. Handling and stopping are the first things in my book on a bike I'm going to put my butt on, getting it faster or farkled out is secondary.

As for a first bike candidate... that would depend on how long you rode and what you rode back in the day. Some of what you learned riding off road is invaluable in my opinion to riding street, some dirt techniques though won't work on the street. It's a larger cc bike than what I would recommend maybe but then I don't know you or your skill level. The street is more unforgiving but you have the advantage of being in ND so maybe the traffic won't be as bad or stupid as it can be here where I live.

Best of luck to you!
 

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Also remember things have moved on a touch in 20 years viz engine/braking/tyres performance......depending on what/how hard you last rode.........although a Sprint ( certainly a pre '05 one) can't be called 'cutting edge' relative to say a Kawasaki 1000 ( Traction control/ABS/Wheelie control etc etc) though I still think it's a crackin Bike to ride!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the great advice!
My previous riding experience was probably about 70/30 (street/dirt), but like was mentioned, things have changed quite a bit since then. Before I buy anything, I'm going to take a basic rider course up here in Kalispell as a refresher...
As far as traffic goes in ND, it's the worst I've ever driven in. At one point, I've been through just about every major city in the USA (I was a truck driver for 19 years). I'm not too concerned about that, though. It's about a 2 mile commute from our camp to our yard....
 

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Sprint's not a great first bike, but it's not a really horrible one either. With experience in the past and the attitude you have, I think you'll be fine.

Keep the battery charged up; these bikes have a sprag clutch in the starter and those can break if the battery is strong enough to start turning it, but not strong enough to get it over TDC. Couldn't hurt to ask the seller to be sure the battery is charged, though that may be over the top.

The only reliability problem I've seen with Triumph's that I don't hear about with other bikes is the low quality rubber Triumph seems to get. Expect a broken battery strap.

As for the rest, whatever used bike checklist you like to use applies.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Matt you sound like you have your head screwed on the right way so I am sure you will not have a problem.

As far as bikes go the Sprint is very easy to ride, a bit top heavy with a tank of gas when low speed maneuvering, compared to some bikes.
But they have very good handling manners and reasonably good brakes.

If you havent ridden for say 20 years the biggies will be .......... a lot more power, a lot more brakes...........a lot better handling..............and modern tyres are quite amazing.

cheers
Dave:)
 

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I bought my Sprint for pretty much the same reason. Wanted a commuter with style, reliability and comfort with the ability to do longer rides. Sprint ticked all the boxes for me.

As a first bike, I'd say there are better ones out there. I bought my Sprint this year after a 6 year hiatus from riding. This season I already went down...grabbed a bit too much front break in the rain. Without the finesse that you gain from experience you'd be more likely to hit the panic button; IMO there are bikes that would be more forgiving.

Also at 5'7 I'm it's a bit too high, but what modest experience I did have with riding did save me from a few embarrassing tips.

But if you're like me and way to attracted to the Sprint's styling and triple exhaust, then you're going to get it anyways. Just ride in your comfort level.

Enjoy!
 

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From what I remember from geography you live in a very under populated sate, which is a good thing. The Sprint is a bike you must spend time on, get the balance right.
Ride flow is essential on any bike especially an ST with 120+ ponies.
Learn the bike, never think anything but what you're on and where you are at. Distraction or absent mindedness can be the end of a lovely day.
Why not try something like a Bonneville first for a bit, they sell very very well used and a year or so getting the road under you would do wonders.
If you must have the Sprint you won't be sorry with the bike but you may find it a tab more then you want to cope with at the start of a long riding life.
 

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montana.matt; but now am looking to get back into it to "commute" from where I live to my job in North Dakota during summer. Of course I'll be riding it here at home too. [/QUOTE said:
I hope you have a once a season commute. Flathead Lk. to the ND. state line is about 500+ mi.!!!!:) The Sprint would be a great bike for that and canyon carving at the same time.

You have two things happening right now: You have been away for 20 years, you are rusty and Triumph plastic is expensive. Another problem is the riding season is rapidly disappearing in Montana, making you just sit and look at this bike you just bought for 5 or 6 mos.

I would wait until the dead of winter to buy and I would probably make my first bike back to riding a Suzuki SV650 or something along those lines. You could ride the SV for a full season and sell it for more than you paid for it.
 

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Hi, i have a 2004 st 955, its my third triumph had a daytona 955i and a 885 before the and i don't ride slow. but the st is more than enough bike for me even after 17 years none stop riding so i would it could be to much for you and would go for a street triple 675 or sv650 or z750
 

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Im inclined to side with Bruce on this one... I dont think the Sprint is a great re-introduction bike.

Something like an SV650, Versys 650, Suzuki DL650 (Vstrom). All can be had a few years old for under $5k (shouldnt bee to hard to stay under $4k), and resell on all 3 is good as well, once you get to that level. SV if you want sporty, DL650 if you want Adventure, and Versys is in the middle. Good power, great reliability, cheap and plentiful parts and dealers, and great aftermarkets.

Then, after some time back on the road, decide where you want to go - Tiger, Sprint, a cruiser, etc.

Not that the Sprint is a bad bike!
 

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I did the same as the original poster. I returned to motorcycling after a 7-8 year absence. In my case I chose an older dual sport.It was cheap and light and reliable...we don't need no steenking ECUs.I followed that with an older liter bike.Then a few more liter class older sport bikes and finally a 1999 Sprint.So far the Sprint is the most enjoyable. It's also very powerful , enough to get into serious trouble.However, fear can be a powerful detterrent to being stupid.My Sprint can easily pull the front wheel off the ground from a standing start and quite often I can feel that the front wheel is off the ground.

You're an adult and are capable of adult decisions. Your request for our assistance is probably just nerves.The triumph is a nice bike and I've owned a lot of different ones.Only you can decide if it;s right for you.

Good luck on your decision ; keep us up to date.
 

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I'd consider the Sprint a good second bike. Get something cheap and simple for your first couple months of riding. You'll probably have a low speed get-off or just drop the bike over in a parking lot before your get your moto legs back under you again. On a Sprint, a tip-over can damage the plastic and mess up those great looks that caught your eye. Now, the Sprint is built much better in that regard than many modern sportbikes (which can be totaled in a tipover), but a naked standard like a Honda CB or Yamaha KZ, or a dual sport 450 or 650 will be more forgiving.

You may go ahead and buy the Sprint today, but I'd work my way into it with an easier bike for the first couple months. Don't commute on your Sprint until you've got the hang of the traffic and the trucks in your area.

Of course, they do sell frame slider kits for the Sprint, which could save your plastic in case of a slide...
 

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This is becoming a "Chestnut" . The Sprint is a powerful , not particularly light bike. NOT for an inexperienced rider. It would be a tragedy to see one trashed . due to inexperience. I would say at least 12/24 months , via a couple of setups before contemplating a Sprint. Maybe a 675 but with great care a bit sooner but not under 12 months.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the replies/opinions. The Sprint I was thinking about sold before I could go look at it, and with no other options locally, I bought a CBR1000F. I've put close to 1500 miles on it with no mishaps or close calls and took and completed the BRC course near the top of my class.

Rest assured I will own a Sprint one day as it's a bike that still ranks at the top of my list.

Take care....
 

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Hi Matt,

One of my previous bikes was an 88 CBR1000F, and I rate it as a nice bike to ride, it sits on the road well and goes where you want it to go and has an element of forgiveness with plenty of power. I really enjoyed that bike.
I went for another ride on my Sprint today and am loving it more each time I ride it, it is an absolutely beautiful bike.
Anyway enjoy your bike while you have it and you will get a sprint one day.

Cheers,
Dan
 

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How about an older Thunderbird 900? Legend, adventurer, or TBS. Less power than the Sprint, but still plenty of power to have a ball on, and built like a tank. Just a thought ;)
 
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