Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, here is the most recent quirk of my now 10 year old America.
Have noticed the needle falls rather low on occasion. Seems to be after I have backed the motorcycle up a few feet, like when positioning or backing into a parking space. Pops back to the correct side of the stop after taking off in the forward direction. Guess there are advantages to the speedo not being driven from the front wheel on the later models.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,853 Posts
There is supposed to be a stop pin on the black dot by the "0".
Your's has apparently broken off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,853 Posts
I didn't realize that any of the EFI models had the mechanical speedometer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
There is supposed to be a stop pin on the black dot by the "0".
Your's has apparently broken off.
The zero MPH stop pin is still in place. The needle falls to zero and stays when stopping. It will just jump past the stop pin on occasion after backing up now.

I didn't realize that any of the EFI models had the mechanical speedometer.
The early transition to EFI (09 & 10 I think) still had the speedo driven by the front wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well, it is not just happening when backing up :laugh2:

Maybe the tip of the zero MPH stop is worn away, the speedo needle is bent/raised or the assembly has gotten sloppy. Was watching when I got home today from an errand. I typically park in a wheel chock at home and was watching the speedo as I slowly rolled in. The front end bounces just a bit as the wheel ramps up and falls over the tipping point and stops in it's secured position. The needle bounced over the zero stop and looked like the first pic again. Here is the front wheel parked.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
191 Posts
WOW!! Does it travel back in time when this happens? How old is 10 in Triumph years? If it works OK when you're riding...……………….(?) Seriously, I'm surprised there's enough force available to make it jump the pin. The last time I had a mechanical speedo apart (1970?), it was driven with a slip connection that was either a rotating magnet or a drag device. Not a hard connection. I think it was an MG Midget (British). What do you plan to do??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hey Bob, at this time I really don't plan to do anything. Other than maybe stop routinely parking in the wheel chock at home. At least for now as long as the speedo works as expected when traveling in the forward direction.
Parking in the chock has been a convenience for a couple of reasons. Can easily check oil level, less left leaning sag of the saddlebags (actually have not had them on for the last year, the top box gets used a lot) and water collection/condensation is on the bottom of things. For example the OEM shocks had more surface rust/corrosion on the left hand side compared to the right side. It also makes changing the oil & filter easier and same for general inspection and maintenance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
191 Posts
I've got the same chock. Made the mistake of pushing the bike into it instead of driving it into it. Spent a week in PT for my lower back. I changed my oil using the center stand, but I'll drive it into the chock for oil checks in the future. Is there an advantage to changing oil with the chock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
While not ideal I have pushed my bike into the chock many times. Pulling my previous Bonneville up onto it's center stand was a very big challenge and from the threads about the America/Speedmaster center stand I would not even attempt that!
With the front in the stand and the rear wheel on the ground there is a small tilt up that would prevent all the oil from draining out. I do have a piece of wood under the rear wheel to help level things out. I cut and screwed down a scrap piece of 2x6 for the rear wheel to rest on. The advantage I see is that I can simply decide to do an oil change and then do it. There is plenty of unrestricted ground/floor area to slide the oil catch pan and tools around.
Didn't have a pic handy so I went out and snapped one that may show it. The wood block and sheet do blend together but the block of wood does have beveled front & rear edges so I can ride or push over it.

edit: Should have also said this solution works well for me but I am not recommending it for others. Things would likely be different if I had a garage to park in!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
191 Posts
I'm sorry, I seem to have highjacked your speedo thread for an oil change one, but you've given me an "ah-ha" moment. For best drainage, is it better to have the rear wheel high than rear wheel low?? It makes sense since the plug is at the front of the crankcase. I do have a Rivco center stand designed by an engineer at the bottom of his class. Impossible for me to pull the bike up on it without even more serious low back injury. I now see that I need to position a 2X10 so that I drive across it into the chock with the rear wheel remaining on the board. I am fortunate to have a garage to do all this in. Must be tough in N. FLA without one. Thanks for the info and the photo.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top