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I got a different agent who tweaked my profile and the rate dropped to $1004 for full coverage with all the bells and whistles.
This is a great point.

When I insured the Speed the second time, I tweaked my profile a bit so the number dropped dramatically. 1 question in particular made a huge difference: How many years have you been riding?

First time I answered that in 2019 it was 3 years. When I changed insurance this year I answered 22 years instead.

I rode my dads (and now my) bike on and off for a couple summers when I was 18 then picked riding back up at age 36. Nobody is going to add up their actual time in the saddle for that answer, they‘ll just go from the first year they started riding, so thats what I did.
 

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This is a great point.

When I insured the Speed the second time, I tweaked my profile a bit so the number dropped dramatically. 1 question in particular made a huge difference: How many years have you been riding?

First time I answered that in 2019 it was 3 years. When I changed insurance this year I answered 22 years instead.

I rode my dads (and now my) bike on and off for a couple summers when I was 18 then picked riding back up at age 36. Nobody is going to add up their actual time in the saddle for that answer, they‘ll just go from the first year they started riding, so thats what I did.
That was the tweak that worked for me. The first agent insisted that I be listed as a new rider. The second simply asked when I first got my M and did the math. Bless her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
That was the tweak that worked for me. The first agent insisted that I be listed as a new rider. The second simply asked when I first got my M and did the math. Bless her.
I see, I just don’t know that I can have that luxury though. I had my M2 prolly 10-15 years ago (for those that don’t know: a license that expires in 5 years, you have this before full M license), I rode my buddy’s bike a bit but didn’t get a bike back then (I needed a car to well, carry stuff haha, so bike wasn’t practical for me back then).

Anyway, my point being, not sure I could say I’ve been riding for 15 years. Don’t they ask for 15 years of insurance?

R
 

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I'm a bit late to answer but given your age, size and some experience - I would go speed twin. Rain mode is great for the break in time but then move over to road mode and I bet you will still be fine.

Not sure if I missed it but have you sat on both bikes?
 

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2020 Triumph Speed Twin
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My first bike was a CB500F, which everyone would agree is a good starter bike. I replaced that after a year or so with a Monster 821, and now have a Speed Twin. I also started riding when I was 40 and in retrospect I could have started with either the Monster or the Speed. You can kill yourself almost as easily on a 50hp bike as a 100hp one if you try hard enough. I don't have experience with the Street Twin, but my issue with smaller engined bikes is they can get buzzy and winded at highway speeds. If riding on the highway is not a big deal for you, wringing all the power out of a Street Twin might be more fun than using 75% of the power on a bigger engine. The engine on the Speed Twin is very tractable, though the throttle is a bit snatchy on/off. The seat height and center of gravity is relatively low and the handling is pretty benign. I'm 5'10" and the riding position on the Speed Twin is a happy spot between sporty and comfortable for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
My first bike was a CB500F, which everyone would agree is a good starter bike. I replaced that after a year or so with a Monster 821, and now have a Speed Twin. I also started riding when I was 40 and in retrospect I could have started with either the Monster or the Speed. You can kill yourself almost as easily on a 50hp bike as a 100hp one if you try hard enough. I don't have experience with the Street Twin, but my issue with smaller engined bikes is they can get buzzy and winded at highway speeds. If riding on the highway is not a big deal for you, wringing all the power out of a Street Twin might be more fun than using 75% of the power on a bigger engine. The engine on the Speed Twin is very tractable, though the throttle is a bit snatchy on/off. The seat height and center of gravity is relatively low and the handling is pretty benign. I'm 5'10" and the riding position on the Speed Twin is a happy spot between sporty and comfortable for me.
these are great things to hear. I actually haven’t listed my proposed use of the bike. I live in Toronto (big city) I did work downtown, but now, well, lol, haven’t been to the office since March 2020, so who knows when I’ll be back — if ever. Anyway, as much as I’d like to ride a bike to work, I really have no desire to ride in the city or in the traffic hell around the city.

Cottage up north, so my use would mostly be highway, nice, scenic backroads, few “Canadian” twisties (read: not like California or Mountain roads).

part of the street T that bothers me is everyone is always saying it’s a “city” bike but does well on the highway but not as good as the street twin lol. Obviously. I’m not sure if this is coming from pre 2019 street twin owners.

I’m in a place where I know I’d like either bike and both would be great fun but if I find I want more than the street, do I wanna take the hit on trade in to get a speed. Who knows I may even feel the street is enough, right?


I'm a bit late to answer but given your age, size and some experience - I would go speed twin. Rain mode is great for the break in time but then move over to road mode and I bet you will still be fine.

Not sure if I missed it but have you sat on both bikes?
which brings this excellent question, haha. I’d love to go and actually sit on both and hopefully that would make my decision easier, however, no Triumph dealers within 500km of me have any street twins (maaaybe stock by the end of May) and I’m not sure If there’s any speed twins in stock ...I’m gonna go look right now, but I don’t believe there is.

Thanks again for all the input, most appreciated.
 

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I see, I just don’t know that I can have that luxury though. I had my M2 prolly 10-15 years ago (for those that don’t know: a license that expires in 5 years, you have this before full M license), I rode my buddy’s bike a bit but didn’t get a bike back then (I needed a car to well, carry stuff haha, so bike wasn’t practical for me back then).

Anyway, my point being, not sure I could say I’ve been riding for 15 years. Don’t they ask for 15 years of insurance?

R
They don’t ask for proof of prior insurance (in order to GET insurance) in the US so I guess for us it depends on how the question is asked. If they’d asked “how many miles have you ridden” I’d have been forced to answer a certain way. (40,000+ since 2016 so I think I’d still be ok). They’d still be getting a guess unless its a new rider with a new bike or someone who literally logs all of their miles.

If they asked “how many years have you ridden a motorcycle”, well, thats a bit tougher to fudge, because you’d need to subtract out any year that you didn’t ride a motorcycle.

If the question is “how long have you been riding for” I’d say there’s room. I could say ”I’ve been riding since 1999”.

The more granular the question gets, the harder it is to answer. The harder it is the answer, the better the chance of losing a potential customer, and that just wont fly in the US.
You get more power on the Speed Twin; the Street Twin will do the ton just fine; you will not notice that much difference at legal speeds.
This just isn’t true at all. I can’t imagine how someone who’s ridden both bikes can draw that conclusion. Its basically the same as saying there’s no difference between a Street Twin and a Thruxton at legal speeds. I’m sure plenty of people would disagree on that as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
They don’t ask for proof of prior insurance (in order to GET insurance) in the US so I guess for us it depends on how the question is asked. If they’d asked “how many miles have you ridden” I’d have been forced to answer a certain way. (40,000+ since 2016 so I think I’d still be ok). They’d still be getting a guess unless its a new rider with a new bike or .....
...This just isn’t true at all. I can’t imagine how someone who’s ridden both bikes can draw that conclusion. Its basically the same as saying there’s no difference between a Street Twin and a Thruxton at legal speeds. I’m sure plenty of people would disagree on that as well.
Yes, once I have the bike definitely be careful what I say and hear when I'm talking to the insurance companies.

And, yes, I know they're both great bikes, but I also wondered how there's not much difference riding at legal speeds...but I can't say as I've driven neither one. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·

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There isn't much difference riding at legal speeds because neither bike is anywhere near its limits at legal speeds. It's like riding a 650 hp V8 Camaro, or a 275 hp V6. If you're just riding around getting groceries, the difference is negligible. If you're road racing like an idiot, yea there is a big difference. If you're on a race track, racing where you should be, again there is a big difference. If you're riding reasonably, even a little on the "sporty" side, the difference is incredibly small. You'll notice things like weight and seat height and general ergos every time you get on the bike though. Those are the things that make a big difference in normal riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
There isn't much difference riding at legal speeds because neither bike is anywhere near its limits at legal speeds. It's like riding a 650 hp V8 Camaro, or a 275 hp V6. If you're just riding around getting groceries, the difference is negligible. If you're road racing like an idiot, yea there is a big difference. If you're on a race track, racing where you should be, again there is a big difference. If you're riding reasonably, even a little on the "sporty" side, the difference is incredibly small. You'll notice things like weight and seat height and general ergos every time you get on the bike though. Those are the things that make a big difference in normal riding.
Yup I totally get what you're saying. I have a GT350 and I had a Golf R (I sold it after a year as there was something I just didn't like about it, I can't explain)...anyway, it's more a feeling you get when driving a GT350 or a Golf R, even though the Golf R was still almost as fast as the GT350 and on the street I'd say more manuverable (due to it's size), it just wasn't what I was looking for.

Anyway, none of you guys can help me with that, it's just personal preference between the two bikes. Which I'd like more, which is the best choice for me. And yes, both go passed legal limits anyway.

I've taken Ford Performance Racing school track course and I can confirm, the way we all drive reasonably, the GT350 on the street is prolly about 10% of it's capabilities...and me even on the track was maaaaybe 30-40%, you have to be driving for years on the track before you can push it.

I'm really 50/50 with this decision and I really think it's going to stem down to ergonomics of the two bikes and which one I feel more comfortable on. If I like both positions, well, that'll just make things harder haha!!
 

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There isn't much difference riding at legal speeds because neither bike is anywhere near its limits at legal speeds. It's like riding a 650 hp V8 Camaro, or a 275 hp V6. If you're just riding around getting groceries, the difference is negligible. If you're road racing like an idiot, yea there is a big difference. If you're on a race track, racing where you should be, again there is a big difference. If you're riding reasonably, even a little on the "sporty" side, the difference is incredibly small. You'll notice things like weight and seat height and general ergos every time you get on the bike though. Those are the things that make a big difference in normal riding.
“Legal speeds” vary from place to place. I’m surrounded by 50mph+ roads and use I95 (65mph+) everyday. Those are my “riding around getting groceries” speed limits. It‘s easy to tell the difference between the 2 bikes when accelerating to 50mph+ and you don’t need to redline to do it.

But if people want to believe the difference is negligible, to each their own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
“Legal speeds” vary from place to place. I’m surrounded by 50mph+ roads and use I95 (65mph+) everyday. Those are my “riding around getting groceries” speed limits. It‘s easy to tell the difference between the 2 bikes when accelerating to 50mph+ and you don’t need to redline to do it.

But if people want to believe the difference is negligible, to each their own.
I haven't even ridden either but I to find it hard to believe the Speed Twin wouldn't be a huge difference. But really, my topic is not which is better (we all know the answer), it's which would be most beneficial to me (or any new rider or someone who's coming back to riding).

Which bike would develop my skills, techniques and abilities the best. As much as I don't wanna admit it, I still think the Street Twin is that bike. I feel there's something to be said that it's better to drive a slow bike hard than a fast bike slow...

Am I just being too cautious? Not that there's anything wrong with that...

To note...I spoke with GP Bikes (in Whitby) and as I'm sure all are aware there's a 2020 Speed Twin, no 2021 model. He said they did in fact get 2 2020 Speed Twins this year but still in the warehouse and not together yet. He also said there's rumours of 2022 Speed Twin. Soooo, in all getting a Street Twin now and then waiting for a new Speed Twin wouldn't be a terrible idea...hopefully they don't mess with it too much! lol



R
 

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The first big bike I brought was a Ducati 600 Monster. I rode it 60 miles home from the dealer, and as soon as I got in I called them and arranged to swap it for a 900.
Power and speed seem intimidating but they will only go as fast as you let them.
Whatever you buy you will get used to in 48 hours, so get the bike your heart really wants.
 

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“Legal speeds” vary from place to place. I’m surrounded by 50mph+ roads and use I95 (65mph+) everyday. Those are my “riding around getting groceries” speed limits. It‘s easy to tell the difference between the 2 bikes when accelerating to 50mph+ and you don’t need to redline to do it.

But if people want to believe the difference is negligible, to each their own.
I don't see how that addresses anything I said. One can certainly tell the difference between the two bikes. Heck, you can tell the difference between a twin and I-4 even if both engines put out the same power. If you're a decent rider, you can feel the difference in adding another 25 pounds of luggage to a bike. I'm not saying you won't be able to tell the difference between the two.

I'm saying that the differences don't amount to a hill of beans when taking it easy and riding within normal traffic. I used to have a CB650. It's a mild mannered 80ish hp bike. When riding around town, or on I-95 at a blistering 65 mph+, it easily keeps pace with traffic and has plenty of power to overtake Grandma. The same can be said for the Speed or Street twins, or triples, or the supercharged H2 or a little Ninja 400. The differences between those bikes at speeds the local sheriff wouldn't object to, are all in ergonomics. None of those bikes are faster around town than any other. Even on those insane 50 mph+ roads you've got up there.
 

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I don't see how that addresses anything I said. One can certainly tell the difference between the two bikes. Heck, you can tell the difference between a twin and I-4 even if both engines put out the same power. If you're a decent rider, you can feel the difference in adding another 25 pounds of luggage to a bike. I'm not saying you won't be able to tell the difference between the two.

I'm saying that the differences don't amount to a hill of beans when taking it easy and riding within normal traffic. I used to have a CB650. It's a mild mannered 80ish hp bike. When riding around town, or on I-95 at a blistering 65 mph+, it easily keeps pace with traffic and has plenty of power to overtake Grandma. The same can be said for the Speed or Street twins, or triples, or the supercharged H2 or a little Ninja 400. The differences between those bikes at speeds the local sheriff wouldn't object to, are all in ergonomics. None of those bikes are faster around town than any other. Even on those insane 50 mph+ roads you've got up there.
No need to be snarky about it, bud. I’ve owned both and logged plenty of miles on each. There’s a clear cut difference. Agree to disagree.
 

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I haven't even ridden either but I to find it hard to believe the Speed Twin wouldn't be a huge difference. But really, my topic is not which is better (we all know the answer), it's which would be most beneficial to me (or any new rider or someone who's coming back to riding).

Which bike would develop my skills, techniques and abilities the best. As much as I don't wanna admit it, I still think the Street Twin is that bike. I feel there's something to be said that it's better to drive a slow bike hard than a fast bike slow...

Am I just being too cautious? Not that there's anything wrong with that...

To note...I spoke with GP Bikes (in Whitby) and as I'm sure all are aware there's a 2020 Speed Twin, no 2021 model. He said they did in fact get 2 2020 Speed Twins this year but still in the warehouse and not together yet. He also said there's rumours of 2022 Speed Twin. Soooo, in all getting a Street Twin now and then waiting for a new Speed Twin wouldn't be a terrible idea...hopefully they don't mess with it too much! lol



R
Certainly nothing wrong with caution. Go with your gut. They’re both great bikes that seem to hold resale value well. I’d be a bit surprised if we didn’t see some changes to the 22’ Speed. There’s certainly areas for improvement.
 

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40-60 mph roads is where the difference between a Speed and Street Twin is most marked IMHO, this is where you'll be feeling the lovely grunt of the 1200cc motor even if you're not opening the throttle very much.
 
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