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Hey guys,

I've seen lot's of great videos on body positioning and getting knee down and the other day was attempting to put it to practice in an empty big parking lot. Well i guess i did something wrong because i low-sided it at aboue 30mph. The bikes completely undamaged due to all the crash protectors i put on doing their job really well.

Right before i slid out i honestly felt like there was no way the bike could lean over more. i was at least trying to get my head down to the level of the mirrors and about half my butt off the seat, but knee down just wasn't happeneing. Does anyone have any good pictures or whatnot that could be a good demonstration of proper body positioning on a naked bike such as my 01 speedy?

thanks guys
 

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Putting your knee down on these bikes is pretty easy to do, but kinda dangerous on public streets littered with crap on the road. The photo below is pretty close to the form I take--chest on tank, elbows tucked in, butt is almost entire off the seat, pivot point is outer foot and knee, no weight on handlebars. It's not something I do regularly on the street unless I'm feeling kinda dumb.



I also found this group of Speed Triples doing their thing.
 

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From a safety point of view I spose being close to the ground in the event of an off has its advantages, but not so good if hanging of throws you off.
 

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Here's two of me...not on my speedie though... but you get the point




Look where you want to be, drop your inside elbow....relax on the grips....butt off the seat and be smoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooth.
 

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Now I can see where I'm going wrong when it comes to cornering. I'm leaning way too far over and grinding my pegs and the sides of my boots instead of keeping the pegs well away from the tarmac and sticking my knee out.:(
 

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The purpose is to keep the bike as upright as possible and using your body to lever the bike. If you are leaning the bike over to try to get your knee down then you are defeating the purpose of the lean. Thus the reason you low sided(although there could be many reasons)
 

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i thought "gettin a knee down" was the result of the required lean angle and weight positioning to take a corner at speeds too high to remain centered in the saddle during turn-in and accel... partialy using the puck as a guage for distance to draggin hard parts, and partially to unload weight to the inside.

once in the middle of a corner, you shouldn't need to drag anything if the suspension is settled and your weight is in the right position.

i sure don't think draggin a knee is a parking lot goal, mate. i'm definately not the authority on racing tho. maybe look into some track instruction?
 

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Now I can see where I'm going wrong when it comes to cornering. I'm leaning way too far over and grinding my pegs and the sides of my boots instead of keeping the pegs well away from the tarmac and sticking my knee out.:(
Maybe/ maybe not...our pegs are not really ideal for the track. If u are really serious, u should get new adjustable rearsets. U may be doing everything right and scrape the pegs or you could be horrendously awful and scrape the pegs.
W
 

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Maybe/ maybe not...our pegs are not really ideal for the track. If u are really serious, u should get new adjustable rearsets. U may be doing everything right and scrape the pegs or you could be horrendously awful and scrape the pegs.
W
That post was sarcasm. I already have racing pegs fitted and am getting heartily sick of being held up on corners by people bouncing around all over their bikes trying to get their knees down instead of just concentrating on going round the corner smoothly.:mad:
I can get my knee down if I want but being realistic on the roads there is no need.
 

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Once you get the technique, it's pretty easy to knee down any bike with a reasonable amount of ground clearance. You don't need to hang off like a gibbon. Enter the corner with ne arse cheek off the seat, point your inside shoulder at the direction you're going (this will turn your upper body into the proper position), point your knee at the ground and wait for that SKKRRSSHHHHH!! If it ain't happening, go faster round the bend. Whatever you do, DON'T look down at your knee whilst cornering.
 

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for me the real issue is to keep my butt lose on the seat to allow some rotation of my hips towards the turn... just leaning and laying my leg/knee out there is only part of it... but also some rotation allows me to shift some of my weight to continue to bear down on bike ... also found out too rigid of a grip by my wrist and hands seems to restrict the bikes feel and flow... grip should be good enough to keep the revs up and let the bike carry you through the turn.

after replacing the factory handlebars... pretty much the same length but lower curve and rotating the bars down to a point of near the tank ... had to rotate the controls upward as to not hit the tank... gave me a much better feel and weight distribution both at speed and much more free body movement... ie .. my weight was not mostly on my butt
 

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also have to say after watching a video taken by someone behind this babe with a full set of leathers and high end sport bike showing off how she worked the turns.. laying the bike really low etc... but by just looking at the trees etc in the background was really not going that fast... the end result was that she high sided the bike when it dug in while 'over cutting and leaning way to much' for the speed... she was alright but the bike rotated a few times in mid air into the woods...

there is a big diff between 'style points' and keeping the power and grip to the pavement

having a little background in flat track racing in my younger days... understood this... for performance type handling... keep your eyes off the speedo and on the tac.... half of handling is using the torque and power curve as indicated by your revs/gear....
 

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do you know? i,m sure that ithe best times i have had on a bike are leant over as far as i personally dare throgh the bendy bits(KEEPING IT UPRIGHT, YOU,R HAVING A LAUGH Mr dBex) and i would love to see how you get a solo motorbike through a bend without leaning it over!! or do the laws of physics work differently in texas??!)
 

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yes bucko there is a reason that tires tread surface of performance bikes are shaped the way they are... my mich pilot power tires I believe are designed to hold a 42 degree lean... which I used much of by viewing surface wear up to the tire sidewall ridge... and due to the soft makeup of the tire... even the ct type... one needs to wear the tires evenly if possible or the tire will become somewhat flattened on the top causing a potential problem when one does lean the bike and the tire surface potential loses grip when changing from a flatter surface to a rounded one..
 

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I'm really not a kneedragger myself, but I've been through some pretty sharp corners at 40mph+ with little chance of getting my knee all the way down. So, it seems to me that 30mph was just a little too slow or the corner you were attempting was too sharp. In a parking lot, you don't have track or road lines to guide you through the apex. Seems to me that in that situation, you were tempted to keep leaning/turning when it wasn't appropriate.
 

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Not an expert here and only been riding the triple for couple months now.
I have had a slightly more forward riding position order to keep more grip on the front (I think I'm carrying that over from riding motards for the past 4 years).
Since I have changed the exhaust and loaded the map, the front has been a little lighter, so that 1 or 2 more inches of body placed towards the front is helping keep the front more positive.
As far as the back goes...well, easy on the gas as much as possible, but that new Pirelli Diablo back there is doing wonders.
I call it my "safe riding attire" as with the kind of job I do (pro athlete), if I fall and get hurt, I'm ****ed for good...
 

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if one follows gp racing you will see the riders moving all over the place... before entering a curve from a high speed straight... you will see them straighten their bodies a bit upward to assist in braking by their bodies catching more air to slow down... drivers look back under their armpits not over their shoulder... shoot for the apex of the curve and let the bikes torque, tire bite, suspension power you out ... sort of like a gyroscope .. after one hits the apex of the curve... basically the bike pretty much takes over... if under good power... usually we cause bad situations by wrong gear, braking or letting off the power while into the turn or over compensating and trying to muscle the bike... honestly when I am hard into a turn under power... my point of feel is my grip and rotation on the throttle... hardly even feel the grip of my other hand... and the rest takes over

at least from my experience once one commits to the turn and begins to lean and steer... they both do a little of each... the degree of lean etc begins to dictate itself by feel... putting the leg/knee out/down does two things in my opinion... shifts some weight... but not much... but more so it free ups the rotation of your body

also a side bar to the bikes handling was to replace the factory weight oil in the front tubes with a weight that was 150% heavier... did make a difference in keeping the front end more stable... before my bike did have the tendency to want to 'walk' towards the outside of the curve... but this also may be due to ones weight and position.
 
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