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First question... Have you ridden a Thruxton yet? You are spending money on assumption to "upgrade" something you know nothing about personally. I came from sport bikes too, literally got off my 675 right on to the (now mine) Thruxton for a test ride. I was VERY surprised how it felt. Just a ton of fun and plenty fast. Is it a 675? Nope. Can it kick up to 110-115? yep (so I've heard;) ) To try to pull a few more horse power out of it for street use is pointless IMO. Having said that, there are several mods that can be done to improve minor things and tons of things to improve looks, handling etc. Ride one, then go from there.
 

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Hello,



I am interested in purchasing a Thruxton but first I have a few questions.





  • How much horsepower can you get before getting a stroker kit?


  • How much horsepower would a stroker kit yield?


  • Where can you get a reasonably priced 17 inch wheel set for this bike?


  • How is the stock suspension with a passenger?


  • Does the motor generate a lot of heat since it is air cooled? (I usually ride daily so this is a bit of concern in Florida)


  • If you try to reduce the weight of the bike does it ruin it's stability on the highway?


Thank you, just trying to get an idea of what I can and should/should not do to the bike and get an idea of what kind of budget I will need.

#1 - not exactly sure on a number. But I did cams carbs and exhaust. And it was plenty of power and plenty of fun.
#2 - I get 92hp with my striker motor. It's more than enough and I have to say it's a different kind of power than my bmw k1200r. And in my opinion much more fun.
#3 - I paid for carozeria wheels. No place is cheap. I think cognito moto is doing relatively cheaper spoked wheels for a fork swap.
#4 - usable but the stock suspension sucks. It was made to be taken off.
#5 - if you get stuck in hot traffic and wear full gear. The motor does just add to the boiling
#6 - no. I've dumped as much weight as I can possibly think of, have shorter folks, smaller wheels and the bike rides better than it ever did stock, or even lightly modded. My whole bike and everything I've done to it can be seen in the link in my signature.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
First question... Have you ridden a Thruxton yet? You are spending money on assumption to "upgrade" something you know nothing about personally. I came from sport bikes too, literally got off my 675 right on to the (now mine) Thruxton for a test ride. I was VERY surprised how it felt. Just a ton of fun and plenty fast. Is it a 675? Nope. Can it kick up to 110-115? yep (so I've heard;) ) To try to pull a few more horse power out of it for street use is pointless IMO. Having said that, there are several mods that can be done to improve minor things and tons of things to improve looks, handling etc. Ride one, then go from there.
I actually have a test ride scheduled for next weekend! My questions are mostly based off of what I've seen most people change on the bike aside from maybe a stroker kit.
 

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The thing about the Thruxton is that it "feels" fast even when you are only going maybe between 70 and 80mph. It's great fun, especially as a daily commuter and I love mine. The incredible looks are just an added bonus.

If you're interested in burnouts and wheelies, though, you'll have a hard time on a Thruxton. It's not just the lack of power, but the thing is *heavy*. A Street Triple might be more your speed. I've definitely had "impure" thoughts about the new Street Triple R, but I probably won't trade.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
So I'm back from Lakeland where I test road Thruxton at the Fun Bike Center.

I really wanted to like the bike. It looked great and it felt great to sit on. But then when I started moving I quickly realized that parallel twins are definitely not for me. I do think the bike was suffering from low fuel though since the low fuel light was on the whole time causing the motor to not perform as good as it should have. Even taking new tires into consideration I did not like the way the Thruxton turns at all either and it felt very unsettling when changing gears even at speed.

So needless to say I was a little let down and reported my sad news to the sales manager when I got back onto the showroom floor and he asked me if there were any other bikes I wanted to ride while they had me there and in town. So I looked at the Street Triple and figured why not?

They rolled one of the base models out and off I was with the next demo group. Oh my god was that bike every single thing I've been wanting since I've owned my ZX6R. It's got the familiar power i'm used to but it's just as comfortable taking it easy as it is going through the gears. Speaking of gears, that transmission is like butter. The first couple turns I took it easy but I quickly realized that you could throw that thing around just like a super-sport and it was perfectly happy with it and I loved it.

It's funny, I was completely infatuated with the Thruxton but as soon as I rode both now all I can think about is the Street Triple and how badly I want the R model and to gladly give over my ZX6R for it.

So needless to say I'll probably be back at the dealer in a few months with my bike to trade in and snag one of those babies. It's funny, I was skeptical of the bike's looks but now that I know she's a freak I find her way more attractive ;).
 

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Coming from a ZX6R or any other modern sportbike to a Thruxton will indeed feel strange and out of sorts if you haven't ridden a modern "classic" bike, no matter the brand. I have an older 955 Daytona and riding the Thruxton at first was a bit old school, but I've been riding for a long time and the ride was familiar to me. The Street is basically a naked modern sportbike with riser bars. No wonder you liked and how it felt familiar to you. I could easily own both a modern sportbike and a Thruxton or Bonnie and enjoy both for different reasons. But, you need to be confident when riding, so buying based on looks alone is not enough.
 

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you could always buy a thunderbird sport! maybe older but a great inbetween with sportbike power and classic looks, it handles great too as it has fully adjustable suspension off the daytona and 17" rims, its like a thruxton on steroids!
 
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