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I bought a cable for my 59. It fit perfectly. They said my bike uses the cable for slickshift. Wasn't the idea of slickshift was to go clutch cableless? I tried shifting from second to third without using the clutch and it just made a lot of racket and banging sounds. Iv'e read where us "Yanks" didn't like the slickshift and converted them. Anyone have one that still works? Is it involved to rebuild the 'slickshift mechanism'.
Still suffering from 'cabin fever'
 

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slickshift wasn't a cable less thing I will look up the details and post them unless someone beats me to it.
riding without using a clutch is very easy once you get the hang of it. match the increase/decrease of engine RPM to the shift point (upshift/downshift) change usually about 500rpm. I have ridden bikes home with failing and/or broken cables. the biggest problem is starting off from a
stoplite.
manual trans cars & trucks can be driven in the same manner
 

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Slickshift was the implementation of a lever on the shifter mechanism inside the outer tranny cover which would actuate the clutch when you depressed the shifter, then release the clutch when you released the lever.

The inner lever pushed on the same bit that the cable pulls on, so it was a slick way of actuating the clutch hands-free.

I need to do a bit of memory jogging to see if it was used for anything but take-off from first gear, and downshifting...


[ This message was edited by: GrandPaulZ on 2007-02-12 20:32 ]
 

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Check the book "Triumph, A Century of Power and Passion", there is a section on the slickshift. In there, it talks about how the racing authorities banned it's use after my friend Howard "Shotgun" Winchester won a bunch of races by getting the holeshot every time because the rule back then was a clean start procedure governed by the flagman needing to see all riders' left hands off the handlebar before he would wave the Green flag. It wasn't cheating because the rulebook didn't address the new mechanism's use.
 

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that's interesting.

so, no lever at all on the handlebar? and just a little goose with the foot actuated the clutch?

would that work if you were in top gear and wanted to coast a few seconds in "clutch-neutral" to figure out what the fool in front of you was doing, or were you committed to a shift?

would also be interesting stopped on a hill.
 

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Hi GPZ, Was the cable hooked to the gear changing mechanism in some manner? Did you forget about the clutch lever altogether and just shift through the gears with the shifter lever? Very interesting I see where some new brands are trying new ways to do away with clutch levers in some manner or another, (auto transmissions, auto shifters, etc.). Maybe this system could go hi-tech and be something. I don't know what the deal is on doing away with clutch levers anyway. I know I wouldn't like it. Might be good for ladies and older, weak gripped men. I can see 4-5 years down the road I might fall in the last category. I probably didn't need to put that last sentence in, but now days if you want to be a women and got the bucks, you can. I agree older Triumph's and Harleys are a stiff pull for some of the ladies, but my V-max had a hydraulic actuated clutch and was easy. And it was trasmitting alot of hp to the rear wheel on a somewhat heavy bike. I don't know about the new Triumph's. Have they addressed this issue?. It seems I remember reading an article on classic machines where they mentioned a certain bike having two clutches. Maybe they were talking about the Slick- Shift in a broad sense. One last question could you modulate the speed in which the clutch engaged? What an interesting subject. I know this is a long post, but this really peaked my interest with no idea how it works mechanically. Thanks Red for the posting and I remember sliding the trannys to the rear for primary chain adj. and pulling the wheel to the rear for drive chain adj.. Remember the tin primarys with the hole in the bottom, for the pri. chain oil to drip through to the street and the chain oilers on the Shovelheads. And the motorcyclists claiming Harley's leaked oil. DUHHHHHH :cool:
 

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i had a slickshift on my 125 CZ when i was a lad and it was a very nice feature working like the triumph one.i never understood why it had so few success with triumph user at the time,it was deleted rather quickly!!
ben
 

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McQueen - Don't put Shotgun in the grave yet! He's still kicking, just not racing. I saw him last year at the Irv Thomas Honda Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation fundraiser in Corpus Christi, where he lives.

He brought out a 50's Harley flathead flat tracker and a 60's Triumph street tracker.

He's a cool old dude.
 

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okie - re-read the post where I explained it. If you modulated the shifter you got grinding gears and burned clutch.

Pretty much what the little Honda mini-trail 70 used before they went to a "real" clutch. You held the shifter down and guned it, then popped the shifter and it would do tremendous wheelies.
 

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The slick-shift gearbox is a wonderfull bit of basic engineering
The gear selector (shifter) will disengage the clutch when moved up or down I once rode all the way home from Waybridge to Farnborough (Hants) with a broken clutch cable using only the gear selector to engage and disengage the clutch. By slowly lifting my foot off of the gear selector I managed to slip the clutch enough to pull away.
After about 1/2 hour of riding this way it became quite easy and I managed to ride about for a few days without the clutch cable.
Just as well really for as a second year apprentice clutch cables were very expensive.
 

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TG: I guess the interface mechanism has the ability to move the ball-ramp in either direction of the shifter's travel? Now that I think about it, it makes sense as long as the ball ramp is right at the base of it's travel when "at rest", and not partially actuated by a stretched cable being nipped up.

I vaguely recall seeing the illustration in that book I mentioned, Shotgun was showing it to everyone when he first got his copy. I believe the author sent it to him, signed.
 

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I have read about the "slickshift" but I have never seen or used one. I do remember the old auto-clutch CT-70 Trail 70s. (And by the way, has anyone seen what nice old CT-70s and Z50s are worth? Whwew!)

On the other hand, back when my '66 Bonnie was a daily rider (before it got crunched in a parking lot hit and run, and I parked it) I only used the clutch for starting from a dead stop. It was easy to shift up and down, and into neutral, by just backing off the throttle slightly (easier that the heavy pull required on the clutch lever.) In fact I use this techniques on most bikes. Saves wear and tear on the clutch. On stick shift cars and trucks, I rarely use the clutch to drop out of gear into neutral. Coming to a stop, just back off the throttle and pop her out of gear.
 
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