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Discussion Starter #1
Seems that the best things have stories, whether a gun, car, motorcycle, maybe some tools. They'd been around, used, and sometimes put in a corner and forgotten. Please bear with me, as this is a tribute to several people.



This Daytona 955i has a story, it is bittersweet though. A fatality, a crisis of conscience, honor of a friend, the flow of life moving on. Also the moving apart of friends over time, and the remembrance of an old request.


So the story goes like this; A young man in the early years of marriage and family life buys a new 2001 Triumph, he finds a internet group of like minded folk to ride with. He has fun, both on the road and in the evening around the campfire. Friends are made amongst a unlikely and motley group of expats, international and local folk.


We all meet a few times a year as a large group in Vermont and split into smaller ~6 person groups for the day portion of the ride. It's a lot of fun and we did this for several years. As will be, smaller groups click and they meet all season to do local rides.



In 2005 on a beautiful August day my friend is riding with his local group, a driver from a side street pulls out and center punches one of the guys on a Tiger, it is fatal. Our wonderful friend passes on the spot, and the group is left to ponder their own mortality.


In early 2006 we all rode to a favorite spot in Vermont, held a ceremony and scattered our friends ashes in the river. In a somber conversation with the Daytona rider, he mentions he will be hanging up his leathers and not riding anymore. I fully understand and respect his reasoning. In 2007 I offer to purchase his bike , but he is not ready to part with it.


We've been friends and acquaintances a long time by my calendar, never mentioned it again and years literally go by. One day last December I get a Pm on facebook, would I like the Daytona? The conversation covers the condition of the bike, mileage, how it was stored and what it immediately needed.


So, it's been in dry storage 13 years,needs tires, fuel lines, vacuum hoses, motor oil, battery. Put away with only 14,000 miles, not even broken in by Triumph standards. I love a good project, and had been shopping actively for one; so I said yes.


We chat a bit longer, no mention of coin comes up. I offer to send a check, he politely declines. He wants the bike to go to a experienced rider, not some kid. He'd like to see it up and running again in it's former glory. We verbally shake hands, done deal



Another good friend will haul bike the bike from Massachusetts to Connecticut , so I call him and set up a pickup for the Daytona. The bike arrives six weeks later by van, gets rolled into the garage, covered and left alone as the garage is unheated and it's middle February.


After getting my daily ride sorted for the new year I've started looking over the Daytona, she will need some love. Tupperware wise a wash and wax is all the plastic needs to be almost showroom new. As for the mechanical; I am very, very curious how hard or easy a modern FI bike will come up after being put away for 13 years with no storage preparation.



Which brings us here;
 

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Wish you well with the restoration. My '98 T595 Daytona has been in deep sleep for almost 4 years now. You have encouraged me to get the Daytona back into the sunshine.
 

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Keep us posted, and let me know if you’re ever riding through NH, I’m always up for a tour. I’ve done the resurrection thing, with the same sentimental feelings, it’s a good day when you get the first miles under you.


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Discussion Starter #4
I most heartily commend Mr. Bloor for resurrecting Triumph, not only that but creating such a bulletproof reentry to the market. As always there are hiccups in product reliability, any product really. With over 175,000 Triumph miles in the past 15 years, mostly on Trophy, Daytona (T300) and Sprint ST (FI), I've had a few issues. Mainly it's been vacuum hose failure, igniter pick ups, and one ECU. The ECU was my fault.

The Daytona is showing the same hose issues as the T300's had. Tomorrow I will remove the airbox so I can inspect the hoses, as the fuel regulator hose literally crumbled in my hands last nite. Will be inspecting all the radiator hoses as well.



I've replaced the plastic fuel fitting with parts from Fresh Water on the pump plate, and original metal fittings from a fuel rail off Ebay. The lovely o-rings from NAPA complete the ensemble along with new hoses from the fuel rail to tank. The original hoses on the ebay rail snapped with little effort, and the hoses stock on the Daytona weren't far behind.
 

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Really looking forward to seeing this progress as I’m in the process of resurrecting my own.
A very heart warming back story too Andrew, I’m sure you’ll do your friend proud, good luck.
 

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Thanks for sharing

Hi Andrew

I really appreciate you taking the rime to post this as a record of the Daytona Resurrection I suppose you can call it.

I also like Stevie appreciate the history with the bike, it makes getting back on the road very special for you and your friend I am sure.

I have to admit I love my '04 Daytona 955i which has recently turned over a bit more than 50,000kms or around 31,000 miles to the 'mericans :)
It runs like a top.

Looking forward to your pictorial and verbal blow by blow account, I have no doubt I will learn stuff as you go.

Thank you mate.
cheers
DaveM:smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Woke this morning and the sky is crying, should have seen the signs. Out to the garage, today's order of business; pull airbox, check plugs, check vacuum lines, reinstall the previous and install the new battery, fresh oil in the sight glass. Done, done and done.


Sometimes we see the goal, and overlook the obstacles in between, today would be that day. I very much want this bike up and running, due to Triumphs poorly held resale value I have a firm set number in mind. That includes new tires, which will be the last purchase before registering and insurance. Realistically, the dmv fees and insurance are not included in my ''firm numbers".


Today's work to date brought me to just shy of $100. The moisture running down my cheeks was not rain, but the realization that I now needed another week of waiting for parts. I'll get back to that in a minute.


Key in and on, lights on, sidestand down and clutch pulled in, some clicks and Humm, gingerly press the starter, vrr rr rr, engine spins freely, oil light goes off, MIL stays lit and no fire. Not even a hint of fire. Just the sound of compression release in the headers. Also noticed the overflow tank was dry, just figured it was low.


Almost by divine providence my cell rings. A good friend, a brother calling to share about his new brit bike conquests. We chat a bit, I update him on my quest. He suggests a good troubleshooting trail to follow, as he is more up to date than I on FI Triumphs I follow his lead. All the fuses meter out, I pull and reseat the relays; more habit than necessity. Then just put the test leads to the FI pump power connector. Here we are, power at the header but no FI pump spool up.


Also will need to service the cooling system, I think they should be stored dry judging by what I'm finding. Look at the sludge pic and judge for yourself.



Off to order parts, there seem to be some good kits on ebay, $50 VS $400+ for oem. Still need a $20 gasket and a $50 fuel filter. Add it to the bottom line, we're going in, weapons hot...


Unlike my Daytona friend who I believe started riding in 2000, I've been afore the mast since 1984. That first bike gave me good service, a 76 cb750 something like 60,000 miles in two years, bug bit deep, deeper than the self destruction I was courting since before HS. Moving deeper into riding and machinery, I met a gent named Indian Bill, due to his generosity I got turned onto shovelheads.


You might wonder what kind of generosity a old biker might show a youngin' ? Well you might say we shared a drink, or a smoke, the more cynical might point out he let me live. Well that would all be correct about him, but what that man did was hand me the keys to his one sole prized possession and say, ''take her for a spin, you might change your mind''. I did, he did, and I found a new religion. Within a year I had my own shovelhead, and nothing left for self destruction.



This may seem a divergence, but it comes back together in Vermont.


Pics below:

These 3 holes belong in the airbox bottom, I could see one for drainage. The slime....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The two immediate take aways about long term storage are that the fuel must be stabilized and run to the injectors, then either topped off or drained from the tank and injector rail. DRY.


The coolant is troubling, I've seen cars sit much longer and still have useable coolant in them, you could run it, but would want to do a flush and fill. There's no sloshing when hoses are sqoozes, so I am thinking gummed up system.



Tuesday I'll pull a lower hose and see what is in there, at the pump probably to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Felony, I'll jot that down in the manual. Hopefully, I'll not need another one. Used up Bike Bandit points so I'll not cry too much.
 

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A pleasant surprise yesterday, beat the weather home while picking up supplies. The radiator and cooling system are fine, the sludge at the filler neck did not permeate the system. Spoke to a friend at NAPA, he confirms that the little there will reabsorb into the system once it is running.


I pulled the lower radiator hose and was rewarded with blue coolant, put it together and noted to refill and flush the system once running.


New fuel pump and filter will be here tomorrow, so there is a distinct possibility again of having a running bike this weekend. Though I'll not hold my breath.


Action photo of coolant, and a clothes off pic of the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Yep, I have to stake the master link too!



Pulled the fuel pump plate out this afternoon, varnish....so cool. Tested the fuel pump, has continuity, but no rotation. I partially disassembled the plate for service and cleaning. I'll get it finished tomorrow with new parts.



Decided to wait on pulling the injectors for cleaning. My friends garage will do them if I ask.



Despite how cruddy the tank looks the varnish is very thin, not too sure about trying to clean it beyond removing the debris. Hate to melt it.




Note: Stabil may have prevented the varnishing, but only if the bike was stored with a full tank. As it is there was only 3/4 gallon in there and it was 13 years....
 

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I'm currently doing an old car fuel tank 35 years old. This time I'm using apple cider vinegar. I dropped about 1 litre in a few days ago and am back to shiny metal on the test spot.
It's an 80 litre tank!
I bought a 20 litre drum from a horse pet supply company but I guess I'll be rotating it for the next few weeks....
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Life happens quick, you leave for work smiles, hugs and come home to getting served, or after watching the texting dingbat in front of you you break and go to pass, next it's sun, shade, sun, shade why am I on my back..


Other times its a....well I'll stop there.


I hit the lotto today, metaphorically that is, otherwise I'd be moving into my 4000sq foot garage with a bedroom and bath. La vida loca baby. Reality settles in. I pulled the fuel pump and flushed it with carb spray. Hooked it to a power source, while giving it a little rotational encouragement with a dental pick......vrrrrrrr it works. Make and break power, it cycles each time. That's good because ebay failed to deliver my new one.



Reinstall it and the new Mahle K-145 that felony suggested, nice and clean. Cleaned up the plate gasket, and removed the crud from inside the tank. A quick flush with fresh gas, then reassemble. A kindly reminder, just beyond finger tight seals the tank.


I had filled the fuel rail with seafoam a few days ago, cycled power, and filled it again. I think this likely saved me from having to have the injectors 'cleaned' or outright trying to replace them. Not many options for those parts.


Reinstall the tank, and add a gallon of what passes for fresh petrol. Now the fun.



It took about 10 power cycles to get the rail primed, brute force, letting the bike do the work. First press of the starter, got a kind of British harrumph from it, a upper class snort. The second, a pop and fizz. The third, well there's magic in the third! A hearty vroom, and an immediate settle into fast idle. Wow !


Let it run while checking for leaks and anomalies, spiders bail ship, a weasel takes off, the ghost of Thatcher leaves. Getting good heat from the oil cooler, then the radiator, a nice cloudy aroma fills the garage as she slides into regular idle, the coolant gauge reads good. Idle for another ten minutes, shut down and off to grill steak.


MIL is still on, but I think it'll clear after a few more cycles. I am impressed with how well this has gone, there's still work to be done. Now that she's running investing in tires and other small work is definitely well in budget.



Short list is:

Tires
chain
flush&fill radiator
oil change and filter I had used synth oil I had 'laying' around, now to mobil1 15w-50
removing the slider hardware from the front (maybe)
a full cleaning and wax
Get it registered.




A quick video
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)



I am, and was rather surprised at the bikes willingness to fire up after its slumber. Oy, and the sound of a trippple I'd forgot the intoxication of the FI motors. Well not really, as last year a mate and I traded off for a blast; he on my sporty and me on his 1050 Tiger.


The 'modern' 1050 is nice, a bit more refined. He and I will get together later this year and perhaps trade off again. I owe him some work so I know I'll be seeing him sooner.


I can't stress strongly enough, that the fuel must have Stabil in it for storage past a few months, and either topped off or drained dry if she's put away longer than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Master link staked, chain adjusted....
Another full heat cycle, bike fired right up and settled in....
Adjusted handlebars and controls...


Took it up and down my street, uncovered two important points: Hard to shift in work boots, not enough flexibility. More importantly, no rear brake. The shaft barely moves in the master cylinder, off to ebay to research replacements.


Happy to say my old carcass found the position comfortable.




Any suggestions for 10,000 mile tires? Was looking at Pirelli Angels, had them on my Trophy and liked them enough.
 

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I swear by pilots. Can’t speak for durability over time though. Always heard good things about the pirelli stuff.


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