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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a new 2018 T120 a couple weeks ago. Yesterday I took off the right side cover, being careful as I know it is plastic, and as I pulled I heard a snap and when it came off the rear pin was still in the gromet, having broken off the cover.

I took it to the dealer complaining that a brand new bike should not have a part this fragile. They said they would photograph it and ask Triumph to replace it under warranty.

I examined the part and it is the cheapest and most fragile part I have ever seen on a motorcycle.

This is the the third Triumph I have owned. I have a 2013 Trophy SE and traded a 2015 Explorer XC for this T120. Both of those bikes are very well made, I hope this T120 is not a mistake.

Any thoughts on this. Are there any aftermarket covers made of metal or a stronger plastic?

Ride Safe,
ZShyster
 

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Maybe it was already weakened from the previous owner, if you pull them straight out of the grommet there's no way they should snap.
I'm very careful with mine on the Thruxton especially after seeing the price of new ones, over £200 each:frown2:
I hope they do replace it but I wouldn't bank on it, might just have to reattach it with araldite or something similar.
It's a good idea to just put a light smear of Grease around the grommets to make the panel fitting easier.
 

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I too, picked up the side covers from Omega Racer. Took about eight weeks to arrive but fit correctly and look pretty good, I'd say. They are heavier than the stock covers. The inside of the covers are a bit rough in finishing (unseen otherwise) and the metal mesh attachment seems a little "lightweight", but easily repairable should the adhesive fail.
 

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In Cafracer's post #2 he correctly suggests a bit of grease to ease the grommet's grip on those plastic protrusions.
I would take this a bit further and suggest a silicone type grease for rubber products. Try it, works very well.

And still further, carefully pulling each corner a little bit and working around to each one ensures that it doesn't pop off at an extreme angle stressing the plastic knob.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Speaking of the Omega Racer side covers, are the pins that go into the grommets stronger than the originals? Are they plastic or metal?

Do you get both sides for the $169 or just one?

Thanks
ZShyster
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good news, the service manager at the dealer I bought the T120 argued with Triumph explaining that this is my third Triumph. Triumph said they would send out a new side cover.

Good news that I will not have to buy a new one but I am still dismayed that this part is so fragile. Again, my Trophy and my Explorer were much more robust in their construction.

ZShyster
 

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A little lube is always a good idea when trying to fit something big into something small.... No s******ing in the back row there.... Particularly where rubber is involved I recommend the use of a little bit of Vaseline. It helps to preserve the rubber too, and has many other uses....... like avoiding corrosive bloom on battery terminals.
 

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While some vehicles may still use lead-acid type batteries, and thus preventing "blooming" terminals might be necessary, most M/C's now use AGM, or sealed, non-spillable type batteries, and thus no acid fumes venting.
So as far as their terminals go, just keeping the contact surfaces clean, and tight with the application of a a little dielectric grease is likely all that's needed.
And speaking of dielectric grease, it's a good idea to coat the conductive surfaces of your electrical connectors with a little bit of the stuff to help keep them weather / moisture proof, and prevent corrosion.

Further, don't forget the application of a little anti-seize compound/lube on (cleaned) steel threads that will go into aluminum alloy. (Those spark plugs....)

And that aforementioned silicone grease is not only good for rubber products, it also works well on those "slider pins" that your disc brake calipers move on when replacing pads.

Dielectric, and silicone grease, as well as anti-seize lube are three effective products with wide application for cars and motorcycles.
 

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A little lube is always a good idea when trying to fit something big into something small.... No s******ing in the back row there.... Particularly where rubber is involved I recommend the use of a little bit of Vaseline. It helps to preserve the rubber too, and has many other uses....... like avoiding corrosive bloom on battery terminals.
Rubber grease is the only thing to use on rubber, Vaseline is not read what's in Vaseline its petroluim base and not good for rubber that is not design for it like fuel hoses and if you get corrosion on battery terminals could be a sign your battery is on the way out.

Ashley
 
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