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Discussion Starter #22
Ah yes...of course...may be a while before I give that a go but definitely something to keep in mind!
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
That makes a lot of sense. Oddly, Washington state doesn't allow splitting or filtering. They considered allow us to pass to left of the leftmost lane where we can take our chances with gravel and all manner of road detritus but cooler heads prevailed.
 

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That makes a lot of sense. Oddly, Washington state doesn't allow splitting or filtering. They considered allow us to pass to left of the leftmost lane where we can take our chances with gravel and all manner of road detritus but cooler heads prevailed.
+1 for using detritus. That may be a first in internet forum history. :thumbsup
 

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Congratulations MunkyC. I can't say you made the RIGHT decision, that's for you, but you made the decision I would have made, after completing a 5700km tour of France, Switzerland and Italy in September on a rented 2018 765 Street Triple R. The Kayaba suspension was perfect on smooth Swiss Alpine passes, a couple of very rough Corsican roads, and as good as you could hope for on cobbled streets in Pompeii and central Milan. I wouldn't change anything, it's perfect for my 82kg weight. Very comfortable, absorbed bumps, but allowed enthusiastic riding, all with about 10kg of gear in the panniers. The other big comfort factor is my Air Hawk cushion. I'd never ride without it. I took 3 weeks to discover that the engine make even more power above 10000rpm!

At home in Australia I ride a 2016 1050 Speed Triple R. The Ohlins suspension works great, and on the "comfort" setting in the owners manual (23 clicks out on the rear compression damping) is reasonably plush, until a sharp bump reminds you that the adjustment is only the low-speed compression damping, and the high-speed (controlled by non-adjustable, but replaceable shim stacks) is still very firm.
IMO, for most riding other on the track, the 765 Street Triple R is the better choice.
IanB
 

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Congrats. You'll certainly love it.
I just traded in my 2014 STR for a 2019 Speed Twin last week. I loved my STR, which I did install the QS. It does beg to be ridden fast. It's one of the reasons that I felt it was time to move on.
Would love to hear your comparison of the two - I'm thinking of making the same trade. Love the looks of the Speed Twin, but I have a hard time not feeling like it's a downgrade from my 18 STR RS - not an insult of the bike - I guess it's just the "retro theme"
 

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It was a little tough deciding to trade my '12 Bonneville SE or '14 Street Triple R for the '19 Speed Twin. It was my preference to not add to the collection and to trade one of them. My Bonneville inched ahead, since it was the more comfortable riding of the two bikes for me and I could ride it almost all day without issues. In case I found the Speed Twin uncomfortable long term, then I at least I still had something that works.

The Speed Twin is surprisingly nimble. It weighs in between my Bonneville and STR. The weight seems to be distributed well, as the bike can be easily moved around the garage like my STR. It turns in easily while riding and feels planted in turns. It's still being broken in, but the additional torque in the Speed Twin compared to the STR is noticeable and enjoyable. Overall I am very happy with the Speed Twin and I am not missing the STR as much as thought I would. No slight on the STR at all - it is great bike. It just no longer was a good fit for type of riding I was doing and planning to do. Even though the Speed Twin looks my Bonneville, it seems to handle closer to the STR (at least the way I was riding it).
 

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Discussion Starter #31
blacki999, glad you liked the R! I've had a blast the past few days and, have to admit, I might have busted over the 5000rpm break-in limit once or twice...or a few more times. Nothing over 7000 but still enough to get up to speed PDQ.

Just put on the arrow clones and couldn't be happier. It's amazing how much of a difference there is and, though small, I swear I actually have better visibility behind me. Now to figure out some way to cover up those bar ends again - the darn weights inside the bars prevented adding the ends that came with the mirrors.
 

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blacki999, glad you liked the R! I've had a blast the past few days and, have to admit, I might have busted over the 5000rpm break-in limit once or twice...or a few more times. Nothing over 7000 but still enough to get up to speed PDQ.

Just put on the arrow clones and couldn't be happier. It's amazing how much of a difference there is and, though small, I swear I actually have better visibility behind me. Now to figure out some way to cover up those bar ends again - the darn weights inside the bars prevented adding the ends that came with the mirrors.
Plenty of generic bar ends that will work. I got some at my local Cycle Gear
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Plenty of generic bar ends that will work. I got some at my local Cycle Gear
At least, on my '19 R, I can screw on new bar ends if they have a M5-0.8 screw but the weights stick out by 1mm or so, thus creating an unsightly gap.

As for removing the weights, I pulled the clutch-side handle and it looks as though there's a transverse pin holding the weights in. I've been hesitant to punch the pin out to free the weights, mostly because I haven't wanted to muck with the throttle handle without having firm clarity of purpose (or confidence that it can actually be punched out, for that matter :) )
 
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