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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I finally got permission from my better half to get back into riding after a 10 year hiatus. Test-rode a Street Triple R a couple of weeks ago and fell in love.

Looking at the R and RS, I'd naturally lean towards the R as it's going to be used for commuting most of the time with odd weekend trips; I also have no real expectation of taking it out to a track day. That said, I did enjoy riding fast and whipping through the twisties back in the day.

So my question is: given that I plan to swap out the mirrors anyway, probably would add a belly-pan, and certainly wouldn't mind the quick-shifter, does the RS make sense? Once I've added the above, the price difference is going to be fairly marginal so I wonder whether it's worth simply pulling the trigger and spending a little more to get a bike that I might, perhaps, want to take out to the track sometime.

My other question relates to the engine tuning. I've read a number of reviews that refer to the RS as being a little twitchy compared to the R, resulting in the R being more suitable for somebody with my expected use-case. Does anybody know whether the Road mode on the RS is equivalent to that of the R? Or anything else I might not have thought of?

Ultimately, I guess all the above boils down to this: is the RS realistically just overkill that's going to be so eager to race that it compromises the fun of the commute and weekend excursions?
 

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I use my RS for commuting 99% of the time. I've also taken it on one track day and was planning on taking it on a 2 week trip (before it got cancelled). Basically, it's my do it all bike.

From what I've read, the difference in power delivery between the two models is small and, to be honest, I've never felt like my RS was lacking mid-range power or didn't do well on the street. Sure, I do have to feather the clutch more that I had to on my previous Yamahas, but I believe the S and the R models would be the same. For me, when I looked at what came with the RS, it was a no-brainer.

As far as it having a twitchy throttle, I've never noticed it. I run in Road most of the time and have used Sport as well. I actually find I'm more confident transitioning from off throttle to on with this bike than I've felt with any of my previous bikes. It really doesn't feel twitchy at all.

As far as feeling eager to race it or it being overkill, I'm sure if I had an R, I'd feel just as eager to wind it out as I do my RS. And, as far as it being overkill, in both my motorcycles and bicycles, I kinda feel like if I can afford it, and I like it, and I find value in the more costly components, then it's fine. I'm certainly no Valentino Rossi or Mar Marquez, nor am I Chris Froome, Lance Armstrong, or Alberto Contrador, so it's all overkill when it really comes down to it.

Good luck and CONGRATS on the bike... whichever you get!!!
 

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Dude....get the RS.

I got the R, and am happy with it. I use it for everything as well. Got the mirrors and levers I wanted in the deal along with a few other goodies and that was only cause I came in (triumph of seattle) at the right time purely on accident. But if I hadn't, and had to purchase those things in addition I'd be starting to creep up on the RS cost. I'm thinking about getting a quickshifter which the RS has. Doubt I could tell the difference at my skill level with the ohlins but it'd be fun to look at. I've heard nothing but praise over the front brakes and wonder how much better they feel not that mine are bad. I've heard you'd have to be some kind of track star to feel the difference power wise between the 2, Just seems like you get an awful lot for that extra grand.

If I were to do it again I'd go with the RS. We only live once. Treat yourself. Then again, a new bike is treating yourself whatever you get haha...enjoy the new ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!

Thanks guys! I guess my best course of action is to skew towards the RS (which is a beautiful Crystal White) but play the two dealers against one another and see who wants to sell an outgoing model year bike the most! >:)
 

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The suspension will likely be stiffer on the RS. That's the only thing I'd take into consideration. I've seen a lot about the RS engine being a bit softer on the bottom. Put in a one tooth smaller countershaft sprocket and bob's your uncle on that score. If fact, I'd recommend that mod to everybody with one of these engines. Huge difference, no downsides.
 

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I test rode both RS and R, and went with the R. My old Thruxton R had Ohlins suspension, and the bike beat me half to death on regular roads, regardless of how it was adjusted. That's why the Thrux is gone now. The RS suspension felt similarly stiff to me.

For me the R is a lot more street friendly. The suspension is quite good, and fully adjustable. I wouldn't let worries about poor suspension be that much of a factor. Unless your name is Valentino, you will never reach it's limits.
 

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I went with the RS because it seemed like a no brainer for the amount of extra gear you get for the price and it came out first. Kinda wish I had the R suspension though, cause it's so much rougher than my previous two sporty bikes. No regrets otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'll confess that I don't understand fancy suspensions very well - I've only ridden non-adjustable bikes in the past. Is it not possible to much with the settings on an RS to reasonably approximate that on an R?
 

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I finally got permission from my better half to get back into riding after a 10 year hiatus. Test-rode a Street Triple R a couple of weeks ago and fell in love.

Looking at the R and RS, I'd naturally lean towards the R as it's going to be used for commuting most of the time with odd weekend trips; I also have no real expectation of taking it out to a track day. That said, I did enjoy riding fast and whipping through the twisties back in the day.
I'll confess that I don't understand fancy suspensions very well - I've only ridden non-adjustable bikes in the past. Is it not possible to much with the settings on an RS to reasonably approximate that on an R?
Given what you want the bike for, and your 10yr hiatus from riding, I suspect you would be quite happy (happier?) with the R. While it is less track focused than the RS, it's no slouch. The R will rail in the twisty roads and will definitely bring a smile to your face. It's one of the most fun little bikes I've had in a good while, and begs to be ridden fast.
 

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There are at least 3-4 threads on this subject in this forum alone. I've posted in at least 2 of them a rather lengthy comparison of certain features as well as the logic behind the obvious (to me) choice - get the RS...for the component upgrades alone.

Have the suspension tweaked if needed, but there is no way in he!! you will make up the difference in add-ons in the aftermarket for what you get on the RS over the R at purchasing time.

Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yea, I really considered that but the TFT on the R and RS is just so darn beautiful...plus there's the possibility that they might eventually release the bluetooth module to hook my phone up! (because that's what I need...another distraction on the road ;) )
 

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Yea, I really considered that but the TFT on the R and RS is just so darn beautiful...plus there's the possibility that they might eventually release the bluetooth module to hook my phone up! (because that's what I need...another distraction on the road ;) )
It's actually quite a bit less of a distraction than pulling your phone out of your jacket, then removing a glove so you can hit the fingerprint sensor, then dialing the number and screaming through your full face helmet while splitting lanes at 100 on your rear wheel.

;)
 

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My opinion....
Go with the RS. I had the R Low. The R is an awesome bike, but the lack of rear suspension adjustment in the R became glaringly apparent for me and my short, 27" inseam and my 110 lb frame (with gear) couldn't even compress the suspension by much when I was on the bike. That bike didn't even know I was there lol. I live in a very busy downtown area in Southern California with a lot of stop and go traffic even with lane splitting and it can be uncomfortable when I can only get one foot down with all the stop and go and hills and crap roads. I made all sorts of adjustments to make my stop and go riding more comfortable on the R, but it was a battle. I had dialed it in pretty good with the help of Dave Moss and was likely going to look at getting a softer spring, but unfortunately the bike and I went down in June and the R was totaled before I could get to getting a softer spring. When it was time to pick up another bike, I ended up going with an RS. I lowered it slightly with Soupy's lowering links and put a seat from the R low on it, dropped the forks through the triple tree a bit and overall it feels like a better fit for me than the R Low did.

A few things I've noticed aside from the adjustability of the Ohlin rear suspension...

The R is great in town when you are toodling around at 30 - 35 mph in stop and go traffic. Put it in 2nd and it just goes nice and easy and very smooth. The RS is a bit more on the twitchy side at those speeds. I find myself using the friction zone a bit more when I'm riding through town to help control the twitchy-ness.
EDIT: My comparison is based on street mode in both the R and RS.

Both the R and the RS have adjustable brake and clutch levers. The RS has a ratio adjustment on the brake lever to adjust the pull effort of the lever that the R does not. I wasn't aware of this before getting the RS and trying to figure out why no one had shorty levers available for it. Even having the lever adjusted closest to the bar is a tad too far for my hands, so I had fitted some aftermarket shorty's on the R and wanted to do the same for the RS. Aftermarket shorty's aren't made for the RS due to the ratio adjustment. They will fit, but at the loss of the adjustment. But, I found that I really like the ratio adjustment and I can dial it in specifically to what works for me and my riding/braking style, so I might keep the stock levers on.

QS....nothing much to say about this, except it's AWESOME!!! That is all. :D
Ok...well a little bit about it...you can add it to the R, but between the parts and labor (or time you spend yourself), the cost of the R to the RS can start to get pretty close. If the choice between the R and RS comes down to costs (instead of features and colors) and you pick up an R and add the QS, it ends up being worth considering a used or clear out RS for the same out the door cost...or less.

I picked up my 2018 RS used with only 3777 miles on it for only a couple hundred more than a 2018 clear out R. I also didn't have to pay the destination and transportation fees they charge you on a new bike. It needed a new front tire, which the dealer supplied of the make/model of my request (Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II) at no extra charge.
Since the RS comes with Supercorsas, which are great track tires but wear out pretty fast being a track tire, I probably have only another 1000 - 1500 miles on mine if I'm lucky. At which point I'll be putting a Diablo Rosso Corsa II on the rear to match the front.

With all of this said, the 2020 has some sexy eyes and other new styling, along with some engine enhancements on the RS, so if you're set on getting a new current year model, the 2020 is hopefully right around the corner.
https://www.rideapart.com/articles/374965/2020-triumph-street-triple-rs-unveiled/

Regardless of which model you choose, the Street Triple is an amazing bike and you will be endlessly impressed at it's versatility.

Please let us know what you end up deciding on.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Whelp, I went and did it - picked up the R.

It was close but playing the two dealers against one another I managed to get a deal I was super happy with. Now time to start saving up for some bar end mirrors and replace those monstrosities!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Oh...and thank you, everybody, for your input. I know this was a duplicate of any number of other threads but it's so personal when it's your hard-earned cash!
 

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Congrats from a fellow R owner, you are going to have so much fun, these bikes are just hilariously good!
 

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Congrats. You'll certainly love it.
I just traded in my 2014 STR for a 2019 Speed Twin last week. I loved my STR, which I did install the QS. It does beg to be ridden fast. It's one of the reasons that I felt it was time to move on.
 

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Oh...and thank you, everybody, for your input. I know this was a duplicate of any number of other threads but it's so personal when it's your hard-earned cash!
Congrats from another R owner (although it's a Daytona), so I'm all in favour of the red subframe and pinstripes:smile2:
I never saw the attraction of bar end mirrors until I got the Thruxton, apart from looking cool the view is so much better, just have to be a bit careful when filtering though.
Going to change my round ones for a pair of these, would probably look good on an STR as well.
https://www.squaredeals-ltd.co.uk/triumph-moto-fit-salt-lake-bar-end-mirrors-blue-tint-special-price-17733-p.asp
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm there with you about the bar-ends. All things being equal, I probably wouldn't bother, but the bunny ears that the R comes with are simply useless at freeway speeds - thus the upgrade (knock-off arrows coming in today!).

What do you mean by "filtering"
 
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