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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to move from the cruiser world into the "adventure touring" arena.

I am quite fascinated by Triumph's lineup.

My question is seat height. I am 5' 10" with a 30 inch inseam. Coming from the cruiser world I have always been able to put both feet flat on the ground. I sat on a 800 xc the other day (low seat) and was only able to put my toes down. The bike felt light and balanced enough that I could lean it and get one foot completely down.

I am sure that there are some riders on here with similar inseams. Do you lower your suspensions? Do you just lean the bike at stoplights, etc?

Thanks

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As someone with a 29 inch inseam, I've found that a combination of things work best. 1) boots with a thicker insole - I use the Daytona M-Star boots; 2) low seat option (Tiger 800 with the low seat is 31.1 inches); and (if necessary) 3) suspension links to lower bike (which reduces ground clearance and you may have to modify the side and center stands or install an adjustable side stand).

Here are some links:

http://www.soupysperformance.com/tiger800.html

http://www.fc-moto.de/epages/fcm.sf/en_gb/?ObjectPath=/Shops/10207048/Products/Daytona-M-Star-GORE-TEX®/SubProducts/34311-3063139-1

Many people will tell you that all you need is one foot down. That is true in most cases, but when you are on uneven terrain, two up and the road (or gravel surface) is slippery, having at least the balls of both feet down can make the difference between staying upright and a drop. I've found that toes are not enough, but you don't need to flat foot both of your feet.

Hope this helps. Bill
 

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I'm 5'8" with a 30" inseam and can almost flat foot but I have the Tiger 800 (Roadie). I have the standard seat in the low position. I know I could easily touch flat foot with the optional low seat. Was the XC seat the low option in the lowest setting?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I incorrectly posted about the bike I sat on..

The XC was the "regular" seat in the low position....

I have not had a chance to sit on a Tiger roadie yet.....The dealer is expecting delivery of one soon......luckily the dealer is less than 5 minutes from my house.

I didnt think that the one foot technique was the best. It would inspire much more confidence to have both feet atleast touching.

Bill929--> did you lower your suspension? If so any handling differences?

Thanks

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes... I am dealing with second wind.....

How do you like the roadie? Ever had it on dirt roads?


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I absolutely LOVE the Roadie! And yes, it has been on many dirt roads. It handles them very well as long as you know there are limitations. For me, the tires limit it more than anything else. If you could flip a switch and have knobby tires, the limitations would be much less.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am completely understand the tiger in either flavor is not an enduro bike....just looking to ride on some well maintained dirt roads...

Cant wait until the dealer gets the roadie....hopefully, its before the salt hits the roads so I can get a test ride in

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Hi Vector,

Have you heard of the "safety position" ??

It's when you come to a stop, you put your left foot down, right foot on the rear brake and therefore holding the bike stationary with the brake light showing for safety. This enables you to have your hand on the throttle in anticipation of pulling away. This is the only technique I've used for the last 25 years and works a treat :) It's taught by Police riders and advanced riders the world over.

If you're from one of those countries that ride on the "wrong" side of the road, it's even better as you have the camber of the road working for you as well.

So I suppose what I'm saying is you don't need to put both feet down :)
 

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Hi Vector,

Have you heard of the "safety position" ??

It's when you come to a stop, you put your left foot down, right foot on the rear brake and therefore holding the bike stationary with the brake light showing for safety. This enables you to have your hand on the throttle in anticipation of pulling away. This is the only technique I've used for the last 25 years and works a treat :) It's taught by Police riders and advanced riders the world over.

If you're from one of those countries that ride on the "wrong" side of the road, it's even better as you have the camber of the road working for you as well.

So I suppose what I'm saying is you don't need to put both feet down :)
That is how I ride most of the time as well. But..., when it comes to slow speed or reversing/positioning your bike with a passenger, fully loaded luggage on uneven loose ground the ability to touch both feet becomes much more reassuring. Even in some slight off camber slow speed stuff in the woods with no luggage can get tricky with a 500+ pound bike under you. One slip of footing with all the bike weight on one foot and you could be down on the ground.
 

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I am completely understand the tiger in either flavor is not an enduro bike....just looking to ride on some well maintained dirt roads...

Cant wait until the dealer gets the roadie....hopefully, its before the salt hits the roads so I can get a test ride in
You will have no problems riding well maintained dirt roads on the 800.


On another note, how are you liking that Droid 4? I'm on my 3rd one now due to a blown ear piece speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Tiger-G,

I have not called it the "safety position" but I do use a similar position/technique at stoplights.

Loading a passenger onto the pillion I imagine could be quite tricky without both feet down.


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That is how I ride most of the time as well. But..., when it comes to slow speed or reversing/positioning your bike with a passenger, fully loaded luggage on uneven loose ground the ability to touch both feet becomes much more reassuring. Even in some slight off camber slow speed stuff in the woods with no luggage can get tricky with a 500+ pound bike under you. One slip of footing with all the bike weight on one foot and you could be down on the ground.
Like when your passenger leans the wrong way when you are stopped...

I have not lowered a Tiger, I just sold my Bonnie and I am shopping for an adventure bike. I have ridden the Tiger Roadie with the low seat (and my M-Star boots) and found it low enough for me to be comfortable. However, if I was riding an Explorer, I'd probably have to lower it an inch or so. I have lowered other bikes and found that if you lower the front end (by raising the fork tubes in the triple tree the same amount), you keep the geometry the same, so the effect on handling is little to none (other than loss of ground clearance). That's why I recommend the use of boots and a low seat to minimize the amount you have to lower the suspension.
 

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Tiger-G,

I have not called it the "safety position" but I do use a similar position/technique at stoplights.

Loading a passenger onto the pillion I imagine could be quite tricky without both feet down.


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Point taken, didn't think of that :)
 

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Graeme,

Re your "safety position" - when I first learnt to ride with the RAC/ACU training course in the 60s that would have been anathema as the clutches of the day would have fried in a couple of minutes. And I still find holding the clutch in ("out" to the purists) for any length of time feels odd as well as leading to cramped hand and wrist so I always knock it into neutral for anything more than a few seconds stop.

WRT one or both feet down, again the training then was for just one (and you were shouted at by ex-RSM types if you dared to put both down). But with a top-heavy bike like my 955i I do like the added stability of being able at least to get both feet on the deck.
 

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Works fine on pavement

Hi Vector,

Have you heard of the "safety position" ??

l.

So I suppose what I'm saying is you don't need to put both feet down :)

I agree with you and do the same, even with my big 800lb touring bike but only when I am on pavement. When I am off road, it is a whole different ballgame. In the dirt or on gravel it is important to put both feet down (at least for me). I ride a TEX 1200 aand once the bike starts to go over it is extremely hard to stop it. I don't need a foot sliding out on some loose dirt.
 

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Graeme,

Re your "safety position" - when I first learnt to ride with the RAC/ACU training course in the 60s that would have been anathema as the clutches of the day would have fried in a couple of minutes. And I still find holding the clutch in ("out" to the purists) for any length of time feels odd as well as leading to cramped hand and wrist so I always knock it into neutral for anything more than a few seconds stop.

WRT one or both feet down, again the training then was for just one (and you were shouted at by ex-RSM types if you dared to put both down). But with a top-heavy bike like my 955i I do like the added stability of being able at least to get both feet on the deck.
Don't want to veer off topic, but we had three motorcyclists killed (separate incidents) in Jacksonville while they were sitting at stoplights. I always position myself with an escape route, in gear and watch my mirrors until one (or often two) cars are safely stopped behind me. If you're in neutral, you don't have enough time to get out of the way (which I've had to do twice in my 35 years of riding). Just a thought.
 

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Vector,
5'8", 30 inch inseam. Roadie, Low seat - No problem - both feet on floor (at least on pavement that is)..

Tom
 
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